Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

Kicking has four parts to it: flexibility, technique, focus and ab's. For the flexibility, I have found PNF stretching to be quite beneficial. This is a form of stretching that uses periodic resistence/contraction followed by relaxation to achieve a deeper strectch and excellent long term results (here is a reasonable Youtube example). Of course flexibility ...


11

First off, start small. Any stretch should be done by going to maximum natural (untensed or relaxed) extension, then moving slightly past it until it feels relaxed and natural, breathing through discomfort, but heeding pain. Once you get into position, hold it until it relaxes, then extend the stretch a little further. Repeat as possible. By going further, ...


9

My answer is not exactly on the question "Rising on the ball or staying flat", but rather tries to make clear the reason why exactly you might prefer to stay flat, and not even pivot away. The underlying reasoning can be transferred to your question, since standing up will diminish power and snap according to the views below. Of course, all of the following ...


9

"It depends." Partly on your goals, partly on what you hope to achieve via sparring. First things first: If shin guards are standard in your studio or if your instructor recommends them, then absolutely get them. You might talk to the senior students and see if they agree with the advice before springing for them, but this is one of the situations you ...


9

Icing reduces swelling. That is the only reason to ice as far as I know. Swelling can inhibit the motion of joints and make the injury more painful. It may also take a long time to reduce back to normal levels. Icing is effective up to about 48 hours after the injury occurred. Basically, if it keeps swelling, then icing it will continue to help stop that ...


8

Try pivoting on the heel, before you shift your weight onto the foot, as opposed to pivoting on the ball after the weight is already on it. I had an interesting experience regarding this question when I switched from traditional Tae Kwon Do to Shaolin Kung Fu years ago: In TKD, there was a very intense focus on all the little details of how exactly to ...


8

I am a huge fan of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching. It is what I used to be able to do the splits cold. Ideally you need a partner for it, but most of it can be done by yourself although you will have slower or limited results doing it solo. The premise of the stretch is to relax the target muscles, then force them to tighten and ...


8

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


8

It's supposed to be hard All serious training is supposed to remain difficult and challenging. If, as you say, you have improved your ability to get through warm-ups and training in general, then you're improving. You will keep improving the more you train. Key word: sporadically Regular training gets you more fit more quickly than irregular training. The ...


7

Pain It sounds like the problem isn't strength so much as your shins hurting when you hit the bag. The pain will get better if you keep hitting the bag several times a week to the point of discomfort or mild pain, but stopping before severe soreness or severe pain. You'll get used to the feeling. If you only go to class once or twice a week, an additional ...


7

Given that women are extremely well represented in Gymnastic competitions, I think it's fair to say that women are quite capable of doing aerobatic flips with kicks. Edit to add: Other than maybe standing up and p***ing into a moving shot-glass, there isn't anything that women aren't capable of.


7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


6

"The Stomp / Push / Teep" kick an effective frontkick. Imagine the kind of kick you'd use if you were trying to kick a door in. You make contact with the flat of your foot.


6

It depends on your target area and your intended results. I use two different types of front kicks, which I refer to as a snap and a thrust. The thrusting front kick is much like a side kick, where you lift your leg and fire the kick straight towards your target area. The snap kick, on the other hand, is comparable to a round-house kick, focusing more on ...


6

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


6

Improve your leg Strength. Do this first because it feeds into any activity requiring balance. Try: Hindu squats. These are great because they have you coming up on the ball of your foot while squatting low. Dynamic/Plyometric squats. For example, box-jumping. It's simple, just get a crate or some of those stackable aerobics platforms. Squat and jump ...


5

I can think of two: Heel front kick. As @Sean Patrick Floyd said, it's more of a thrust kick Toe front kick. Basically, you will kick straight in, with your toes into the target. The target, in this instance, is the abdominal waist band muscles. The direction of the strike is in and down. I do not recommend the toe front kick lightly - for most people ...


5

Slugster's great post forgot to mention relaxation. Conditioning to build strength and improve flexibility is very important. However, fast, fluid motion also requires you to be relaxed and it's harder to achieve relaxation of the large leg muscles than it is of the arms. One drill I give people is to get a pile of cushions at a height they can ...


5

Short answer - catch your shin on your opponent's knee or elbow in a roundhouse kick without shin guards and see how you feel. ;) Or, to look at it another way - Do targets defeat the purpose in training? Does a face mask or mouth guard defeat the purpose of training? Does practising with dull/not metal throwing stars or a wooden blade defeat the purpose? ...


5

If you're conditioning your body, shin guards defeat the purpose. If you're sparring, shin guards allow you to walk home afterwards.


5

If there's one thing I've learned over the years of training (Ninjutsu as well): It's better to have the equipment and not need it than to need it and not have it. If the instructor suggests them, buy them; he'll make your life hell if he thinks you're not taking his advice. Any sort of padding will make the training less realistic, but is that necessarily ...


5

Women are under-represented in martial arts generally, not just in tricking. It isn't that they aren't well-suited. I think this is a culture problem more than a physiology one (though physiology does play a part). The culture problem I'm speaking of is mult-faceted, but boils down to the overwhelming masculinity in martial arts culture. Women can feel ...


5

Time it better through endless repetitions. Be lighter on your feet. Also, you could instead step in and deliver a straight right to the face. I prefer that to checking. Train it more. You're aware of it now, you'll improve now.


4

The things that help for me, or maybe I only thought they did, were: stretching and warming up thoroughly in the morning going for walks drinking plenty of water eating lots of quality food In other words, the things we should be doing normally.


4

For me icing is the most effective. On the first two days, I iced bruised area for ten minutes. It keeps my bruised area from going black. And I go jogging once a week. I feel that lots of minor injuries go away after running, since it helps blood flows.


4

You need to shift your thinking slightly. When wearing a boot, stop thinking about striking with the toes back, down, etc. You want to focus more on what part of the shoe will be striking for the most effect. Read flody's answer, it's pretty good. The other thing to think about is striking for maximum damage. When we practice street sparring, I rarely go ...


4

We utilise a drill where the kick is broken down into four stages. The stages are: Raise the knee (keeping the leg bent) Thrust the kick out, and hold it for a couple of seconds Return the kick to the position attained at the end of step #1 Place the foot back on the floor, so you are back in your stance (place the foot, don't just drop it) This is ...


4

Yes, I agree with Alan's answer that women are quite able to perform at a high level in gymnastics, so tricking is not a problem for them physically. And I agree with others that there are generally more men in martial arts than women, so that is a part of the explanation. Then there's the fact that there really aren't many "tricking" classes offered, ...


4

It seems to me that you're right about the fact that both the kicker and the checker should recieve the same amount of force. There are, however, other factors to take into consideration. When I practiced Gung Fu, we ofter perfomed exercises with the intent of strenghening our bones and building up protective cartilage. I would assume this is done in other ...


4

There has been some discussion about the variables at play in this particular leg break, and leg breaks from checked leg kicks in general. It seems that turning the hip over during the kick helps prevent injuring oneself. There is also a difference between a leg kick being checked against the receivers shin or against their knee. The latter is stronger. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible