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8

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


8

It's supposed to be hard All serious training is supposed to remain difficult and challenging. If, as you say, you have improved your ability to get through warm-ups and training in general, then you're improving. You will keep improving the more you train. Key word: sporadically Regular training gets you more fit more quickly than irregular training. The ...


7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


7

Given that women are extremely well represented in Gymnastic competitions, I think it's fair to say that women are quite capable of doing aerobatic flips with kicks. Edit to add: Other than maybe standing up and p***ing into a moving shot-glass, there isn't anything that women aren't capable of.


6

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


6

Improve your leg Strength. Do this first because it feeds into any activity requiring balance. Try: Hindu squats. These are great because they have you coming up on the ball of your foot while squatting low. Dynamic/Plyometric squats. For example, box-jumping. It's simple, just get a crate or some of those stackable aerobics platforms. Squat and jump ...


5

Women are under-represented in martial arts generally, not just in tricking. It isn't that they aren't well-suited. I think this is a culture problem more than a physiology one (though physiology does play a part). The culture problem I'm speaking of is mult-faceted, but boils down to the overwhelming masculinity in martial arts culture. Women can feel ...


5

Time it better through endless repetitions. Be lighter on your feet. Also, you could instead step in and deliver a straight right to the face. I prefer that to checking. Train it more. You're aware of it now, you'll improve now.


4

Yes, I agree with Alan's answer that women are quite able to perform at a high level in gymnastics, so tricking is not a problem for them physically. And I agree with others that there are generally more men in martial arts than women, so that is a part of the explanation. Then there's the fact that there really aren't many "tricking" classes offered, ...


4

Based on the information provided, it sounds like you might benefit from placing more weight on the back leg. When I practice blocking with my lead leg, I find that it works much quicker if the weight distribution is more towards the back leg. It's hard to say without actually watching what you're doing, but it might be helpful to also bend the back leg ...


4

There has been some discussion about the variables at play in this particular leg break, and leg breaks from checked leg kicks in general. It seems that turning the hip over during the kick helps prevent injuring oneself. There is also a difference between a leg kick being checked against the receivers shin or against their knee. The latter is stronger. ...


4

It seems to me that you're right about the fact that both the kicker and the checker should recieve the same amount of force. There are, however, other factors to take into consideration. When I practiced Gung Fu, we ofter perfomed exercises with the intent of strenghening our bones and building up protective cartilage. I would assume this is done in other ...


4

zhan zhuang or stand like a post. (the article is rather terse, but the references at the bottom will probably be helpful. I'm not sure this is a skill I'd want to learn from the internet, but any practitioner of Chinese martial arts should be able to help you with the basics. You need to improve your stabilizers - the muscles that surround your ankles ...


3

This is equivalent to boxers punching their opponents' arms: it increases muscle fatigue in later rounds. There are other uses as well, but this is the most useful effect.


3

It is ideal—in any martial science which delivers blows as heavy as those in Muay Thai—to have some support around the joints most frequently used. This is one reason why the ankle is wrapped—akin to having a knee brace. This provides support and reinforcement The second reason is for protection. That added layer of cloth, or whatever is used to wrap the ...


3

Yes kicking frequently on a target like a bag or a mitts will harden and make your shins harder. Just keep doing it frequent (at least 2 times a week, more would be better). A more extreme training method is to kick on car tires (some muay thai fighters are actually doing it). Yes, and good leg conditioning (running, jumping, weights, etc) in general will ...


3

Mentally, take a step back and think about what your performance of these techniques is like. If "poor balance" were specific to a kick or two I'd be worried about flexibility, but if it's pervasive through kata then it sounds like your mental focus and attitude to the technique is wrong. Think more about clean, minimal, precise movement, with the body ...


3

A simple practical exercise that will improve your kicking balance: Do straight leg kicks without ever setting the kicking leg down. You don't have to do them aggressively or high at first. Even a 30 or 45 degree kick is sufficient to start you off. But when the leg returns, either don't set it down, or do the lightest toe-touch possible. Gentle, ...


2

It may prevent burns from scraping the ankle or the top of the foot on the canvas when slipping and getting back up. But I highly doubt that's the reason fighters wear them. I think it's more psychological. I remember when I was a young Taekwondo-ka, if I had wraps around my knees and ankles, it just felt like I could kick better. There's no science to ...


2

I don't know why kickboxers use ankle wraps, but I just happened to come across Reddit's /r/muaythai FAQ, which says they are for general ankle support: You may see thai fighters wearing what look like ankle braces while training or fighting. These are ankle supports that can help keep prevent a fighter from rolling his or her ankle while training or ...


2

What Is A Bruise A bruise is a rupturing of the capillaries under the skin which causes blood to pool in the adjacent tissues. Swelling and increased pressure from the bleeding causes the firing of nerve endings in the area, which the brain translates as pain. Treating a Bruise Bruising heals in accordance with the severity of the damage to the tissues, ...


2

Honestly, it is a choice between getting kicked in the flesh where I get hurt but the guy who kicked me didn't and checking so we both suffer pain. Once I check, he might be less inclined to throw another hard kick, because it hurts him just as much.


2

I think that the reason that the checker receives less pain than the kicker is because of what part of the shin the checker uses to block the kick. The checker uses the upper part of the shin, close to the knee. The kicker uses the lower part of the shin, close to the foot. Due to the great thickness (or density, I'm not sure) of the upper shin, I think ...


2

Try to kick a little wider and hit with your shin, unbalance them right as they step down on a jab for example. You can disrupt their balance with this kick. A few good ones will hurt their leg, even in sparring with shinpads on. You can attack with it; use it to set up strikes to the head, or you can counter his advance with it as he jabs in; it ruins the ...


2

Most of what has been said so far is correct and in your question you asked about reducing the impact. This is also a big factor. If your leg can move when hit, the impact is greatly reduced. If your foot is planted then you absorb the full force. This also places a large side load on your knee. Our legs are designed to take hits from the front, that is why ...


2

Make sure you are actually landing the kick with your shin and not your instep, even when wearing protection. This technique done poorly without instep protection can damage your foot. I lost nearly half a year of training after one match of a dozen sloppy kicks.


2

Cycling is my favourite leg conditioning exercise. Get a bike with clip-in pedals and do incline rides. Get your legs used to doing strenuous exercise for prolonged periods. I would argue that cycling is better exercise than running for martial arts because you're using all of the major leg muscles, not just the shins and calves. And something that a lot ...


2

I'm not sure how "in Muay Thai" fits in; what differentiates a Muay Thai response from any other? Whether or not it's advisable to move in to the kick depends on many factors; obviously if you're not where the kick was targeted, the impact will be reduced, because physics. Legs can be grabbed for sweeps, but capturing a leg that's at head height isn't ...


2

One thing that slows people down is putting tension on their blocking leg too early. The leg should stay very relaxed while moving up. Apply tension only in the moment before checking the incoming leg. One drill you can do for that is to do a couple of minutes of quickly lifting your knees as if to block after a long training. Because you are already ...


2

Slow kicks and slow leg raises. Balance is a feedback game - your proprioception and your muscle response. How fast you can sense your own balance, and how fast you can get your stabilizers to do the necessary micro adjustments in firing the correct muscles. When you balance or stabilize, it's not like your body turns on ALL of the stabilizers at once - ...



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