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12

Height gives a considerable advantage to striking martial arts. The first and most obvious advantage is that height means you can reach out further than your opponent, meaning you can hit him before he hits you. But there are other advantages that you don't immediately consider: If you have to punch upwards towards a taller opponent's head, you don't ...


7

Chambering is an analogy drawn from firearms. In firearms, you chamber a round (put a bullet in the chamber). In the same way as you chamber a round in firearms, you can chamber a kick to "fire" it. This is very probably an American saying in martial arts. When one refers to chambering a technique (any technique, but in this case a kick), they mean fully ...


7

While "back kick" is mostly synonymous with "side kick" in most martial arts, there are styles that do have a back kick that is subtly but very significantly different than a side-kick. This is perhaps what you're picking up on. In a side kick, you will raise your leg up and inwards, chambering the kicking leg in a position whereby the kicking leg is ...


6

Karate and Tae Kwon Do have a lot of overlap. So many of the techniques will be very similar. However, the slight differences cause more issues as you get to a higher level. The best way to improve at something is usually to practice that thing. For kicking start low and make sure you are getting the technique right (it is more important that you generate ...


6

At least in boxing, height in and of itself doesn't give you an advantage. What gives the advantage to the taller boxer, assuming roughly equal levels of skill and experience, is greater reach. So the trick for the taller boxer becomes one of staying in the narrow zone where he can hit the other guy without being hit in return. In the specific example of ...


6

I've covered this briefly in another answer, but splits don't help kicks. You should, in around 6 weeks be able to achieve your maximum kicking height doing dynamic stretches (leg swings). Each morning, do between 1 to 3 sets of 10 leg swings to the front, side and back. You don't need to force this or feel pain, just swing until you can't swing any ...


5

Your shin can break if you kick someone very hard and they block just right and all conditions align against you. You can break your hand punching someone, even aiming to soft targets like the ribs. You can blow out your knee throwing someone with ouchigari. You can get concussed into unconsciousness taking someone down with a double-leg if they time their ...


5

Your master has been doing this stuff for several years (hopefully), so obviously he'll look better at it. It took me a good 6 months to be able to kick above my head and 2 years before I could do a full split. That didn't stop me from being successful in Taekwondo. You need more than just flexibility for high kicks though. You also need strong core ...


4

Trying to achieve a full split in just two months is an optimistic goal; I would expect it to take longer. my inner thighs and outer hips pain a lot. Immediately I would make a distinction between discomfort and pain. You should feel discomfort, but if you are feeling pain then you need to stop and re-evaluate what you are doing. Having discomfort in ...


4

FWIW, after struggling similarly (and being given many different stretches and training methods to "fix" it) I had an MRI done and found out that my hips are formed in such a way that it is essentially impossible for me to kick above the mid-section from the side. No amount of training could ever overcome this. The only way to fix it would be to have my hip ...


4

You shouldn't need to train in a different art to improve your flexibility. A fellow black-belt in TKD improved her kicking through regular stretching; she had a routine that she completed (possibly still completes!) several times a week. I'm afraid I don't know what her routine was, so I can't describe it for you; equally, the stretches that worked for her ...


3

Well.. They do shin conditioning prior to sparring. A weak shin will always tend to break if it's blocked with the knee or a stronger shin. So you should be careful when using your shin to kick. That's why most of the Muay Thai fighters tend to hit lower kicks aiming for outer thighs of the opponents which reduces the risk of damaging / breaking their shins. ...


3

First, arching the back has a positive effect of slightly increasing your reach during the kick, as the displacement of your upper body backwards allows you to thrust your hips forward that small amount. One martial art where you will see this significantly is Capoeira, where the traditional Benção, a front thrust kick, involves arching the back to increase ...


3

Conditioning is one part of kicking safely with a shin to make it stronger gradually by damage/repair periods. However conditioning also teaches how to kick with your shin on an acute angle that will not hurt or break the shin. Also, the lower part of the shin should be used, close to the instep. This part is not as likely to break and some strapping or shin ...


3

I had similar thoughts. The issue is complicated. The best stretches are not what we would normally do on the dojo floor. They might work fine if you started as a toddler, and did them daily for the rest of your life, but they seem less effective as an adult. So, find a partner, and do "active stretching". There are loads of videos on the web for this ...


3

I know this is an old question but I'm relatively new to this site and thought I could help. I can do a 180 degree split if it's front to back but it's still at times difficult to kick an opponent in the head with a roundhouse. What has helped me, believe it or not, is yoga, specifically a pose called pigeon. What this does is help get a deep stretch ...


3

I have a couple suggestions for you on this issue: If you plan on using this for punches, kicks, knees, elbows, and possibly sword work I would suggest getting something like a kendo stick to do the sword work. Kendo Stick on Amazon This will help minimize any damage to the bag that would be caused by a bo staff or a dull sword but still give you the feel ...


3

Ice is no longer the darling of the medical community for reducing inflammation or bruising. Gabe Mirkin, MD, who apparently first coined the RICE mnemonic, has references on his blog dated March 2014 for why ice delays recovery from injury. The summary is ice reduces inflammation in the short term, but impairs the healing process.


2

I like to hit low kicks when my opponent is stepping forward, so as to disrupt their footing, or when my opponent is flat-footed and heavy on the lead leg, allowing me a stationary target so I can load up and do some damage. Another approach is to force the opponent to retreat, then attack the leg they leave behind, as Mauricio "Shogun" Rua did to Lyoto ...


2

Well...the one answering your questions are absolutely right. Low kicks are best used when most of your opponent's weight is on one leg, preferably when he/she is kicking at you. Jus' dodge the kick (by ducking if a high-kick or by side-stepping or moving out of range) and give a kick on his/her leg. If in a serious fight, hitting the back of the knee will ...


2

Full split in 2 months? Don't be so hard on yourself, it can take years. Then consider, is there really ever a need in a combat situation to kick that high? Seems like a flowery waste of energy to me.


2

Many power punches and kicks get their power coming up from the ground. Both those styles of kicking get their power mainly coming up from the ground and into your kick. When kicking straight forward keeping hips square with target, you are able to perform a much more snappier kick with your leg because your balance point is near a more neutral point around ...


1

Arching your back... there's a right way to do it, and a wrong way to do it. Beginners do it the wrong way, and what happens is that as the upper body goes backward, and the leg goes forward, the foot doesn't have much to back up the kick. If it's a front kick or round house (any X- or Y-axis kick) then you have the potential to miss the target by ...


1

I supose that you are talking about the low-kick aka kick to the thigh. I would like to make a difference between a kick with the front leg (1.) and a kick with the back leg (2.) (keep in mind that you are standing in fighting stance where one leg is in front and one back). My proposal would be the following: A kick with the front leg is faster because ...


1

The thing is to time your kick to make contact when your opponent's balance is on the leg that you are kicking. That way your kick will do more damage as they can't absorb much force with no give on the leg. If their balance is on the opposite leg, your kick can be checked. This is why small rapid steps during mobility gives you the time and balance to ...


1

Some are spinning to face backwards and kicking with toes pointed down, hips pointed away from the target. Others are spinning 3/4 of the way around and then essentially doing a side kick, toes and hips pointed to the side. Is one of these more correct? Or are these two distinct kicks. From the perspecitive of any given style or school, whether one is ...


1

Me being a taller guy gives me a greater advantage with kicks, as seen in other answers it allows more reach and the ability to keep you opponent at bay. Now to gain advantage if you're shorter is to simply move in close and cut off their techniques. It is especially hard for a tall person to get a successful kick in if their opponent is up in their face. ...


1

Knockouts happen because of concussions, not how hard the foot, shin or hand striking the head is. Shin guards will hurt less, but will be just as effective at delivering a knockout. Use this info as you wish. This doesn't really answer your question, but it's useful information.


1

I'm a trained MMA fighter that has focused in Muay Thai and Boxing and let me tell you while the inside leg kick doesn't look like much it certainly adds up and hurts like hell after a while. The purpose of them is to take away your opponent's base and while they may still be able to stand on that leg it certainly affects their power significantly. Also, as ...



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