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7

Given that women are extremely well represented in Gymnastic competitions, I think it's fair to say that women are quite capable of doing aerobatic flips with kicks. Edit to add: Other than maybe standing up and p***ing into a moving shot-glass, there isn't anything that women aren't capable of.


7

It's supposed to be hard All serious training is supposed to remain difficult and challenging. If, as you say, you have improved your ability to get through warm-ups and training in general, then you're improving. You will keep improving the more you train. Key word: sporadically Regular training gets you more fit more quickly than irregular training. The ...


6

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


6

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


5

Women are under-represented in martial arts generally, not just in tricking. It isn't that they aren't well-suited. I think this is a culture problem more than a physiology one (though physiology does play a part). The culture problem I'm speaking of is mult-faceted, but boils down to the overwhelming masculinity in martial arts culture. Women can feel ...


5

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


4

Yes, I agree with Alan's answer that women are quite able to perform at a high level in gymnastics, so tricking is not a problem for them physically. And I agree with others that there are generally more men in martial arts than women, so that is a part of the explanation. Then there's the fact that there really aren't many "tricking" classes offered, ...


4

There has been some discussion about the variables at play in this particular leg break, and leg breaks from checked leg kicks in general. It seems that turning the hip over during the kick helps prevent injuring oneself. There is also a difference between a leg kick being checked against the receivers shin or against their knee. The latter is stronger. ...


4

It seems to me that you're right about the fact that both the kicker and the checker should recieve the same amount of force. There are, however, other factors to take into consideration. When I practiced Gung Fu, we ofter perfomed exercises with the intent of strenghening our bones and building up protective cartilage. I would assume this is done in other ...


3

Based on the information provided, it sounds like you might benefit from placing more weight on the back leg. When I practice blocking with my lead leg, I find that it works much quicker if the weight distribution is more towards the back leg. It's hard to say without actually watching what you're doing, but it might be helpful to also bend the back leg ...


2

You might have sleepy glutes. It's tough to say what's wrong or what will help without seeing the specific problem. But if your job is sedentary and you don't lift, I bet you have sleepy glutes and a weak back and legs, and fixing those would help. If you're not squatting and deadlifting, you need to start. Corrective exercises for posture, such as yoga, ...


2

Weakness It could be that your hip flexor was tired or even inflamed, since you're not used to raising your leg to the front. If this is the case, recovery and subsequent training over several weeks should resolve the issue. Inflexibility Though you can do a split to the front and back, maybe your dynamic flexibility is poor. Static flexibility does not ...


2

Is there anything I can do to increase the power of my turning kick? Make sure you have the full rotation. For a roundhouse, your standing foot should be close to 90 degrees at the end of the kick. You can check this by going up against a wall and extending your leg out to kick (using wall to balance as needed). When it reaches the full extension, ...


2

Kick a heavy bag? do simple turning kicks at knee height, chest height and (when you can) head height on a heavy punch bag. Over time your flexibility will increase along with your power. If your hip movement is currently weak, you should find your strength increases quickly. I recommend leg raises and plank exercise (google them) as this will work your ...


2

Try to kick a little wider and hit with your shin, unbalance them right as they step down on a jab for example. You can disrupt their balance with this kick. A few good ones will hurt their leg, even in sparring with shinpads on. You can attack with it; use it to set up strikes to the head, or you can counter his advance with it as he jabs in; it ruins the ...


2

It is ideal—in any martial science which delivers blows as heavy as those in Muay Thai—to have some support around the joints most frequently used. This is one reason why the ankle is wrapped—akin to having a knee brace. This provides support and reinforcement The second reason is for protection. That added layer of cloth, or whatever is used to wrap the ...


2

I think that the reason that the checker receives less pain than the kicker is because of what part of the shin the checker uses to block the kick. The checker uses the upper part of the shin, close to the knee. The kicker uses the lower part of the shin, close to the foot. Due to the great thickness (or density, I'm not sure) of the upper shin, I think ...


2

PNF is great! I started using it about 10 years ago and it has done wonders for me and some students. It is tough to show this method to students in class to most as there are different skill levels, and sometimes a new student or two. I try to incorporate this into my karate program as well as yoga poses in the beginning and at the end. I also use straps ...


2

Most of what has been said so far is correct and in your question you asked about reducing the impact. This is also a big factor. If your leg can move when hit, the impact is greatly reduced. If your foot is planted then you absorb the full force. This also places a large side load on your knee. Our legs are designed to take hits from the front, that is why ...


2

Cycling is my favourite leg conditioning exercise. Get a bike with clip-in pedals and do incline rides. Get your legs used to doing strenuous exercise for prolonged periods. I would argue that cycling is better exercise than running for martial arts because you're using all of the major leg muscles, not just the shins and calves. And something that a lot ...


1

Just as you have mentioned in your question I have noticed when I check a kick that the point of impact and the actual stoping point of the kick are far enough apart to allow a bit of dissipation of power from the kick You are also stoping the kick before full power can be reached. It is like the monk who throws his stomach into the punch then allows ...


1

While individual cases are, of course, individual cases, I would actually argue that there may be physical obstacles that reduce the incidence. Women have a different center of gravity, enough that a different roll is suggested for parkour, and, not to be indelicate, but many women have an additional mass on their chest which makes rapid rotation around ...


1

It may prevent burns from scraping the ankle or the top of the foot on the canvas when slipping and getting back up. But I highly doubt that's the reason fighters wear them. I think it's more psychological. I remember when I was a young Taekwondo-ka, if I had wraps around my knees and ankles, it just felt like I could kick better. There's no science to ...


1

I don't know why kickboxers use ankle wraps, but I just happened to come across Reddit's /r/muaythai FAQ, which says they are for general ankle support: You may see thai fighters wearing what look like ankle braces while training or fighting. These are ankle supports that can help keep prevent a fighter from rolling his or her ankle while training or ...


1

Kick through the bag, instead of into it. The snap is merely to minimise the chance of you getting your leg grabbed and your crown jewels turned to scrambled eggs. Apart from that, you need to ensure your hips are loose and that you are limber. The greater your range of motion and the larger the arc of your kick, the more velocity will be behind it. Look at ...


1

A good start is to sit on a Swiss ball and move around on it much of the day. This will build up your core muscles, the fine muscles in your hips and, most importantly, loosen things up. Explosive power also comes from removing opposition. Seriously, you probably have many times the power you think you have but can't apply it. One of our advanced ...


1

There are too many variables to consider to be able to pick one out and say "This is why", and you don't specify what kind of a "turning" kick you are doing. This could be a reverse, a spin, or simply a round kick. To address Dungarth's point, when you do your front kick, do you draw your entire leg and knee up to your chest and then push out straight ...


1

First of all make sure your technique is correct or otherwise you wouldn't be solving the root problem. Next you should some exercises to develop you muscles. You could try training with kettlebells, the swing for instance uses a hip hinge to power the motion. More info on the swing here: http://www.menshealth.com/fitness/eow-kettlebell-swing There are ...


1

Strike a punching bag. Also, do a regiment of core-strengthening exercises and stretches. Striking a punching bag will remove the hesitation one has when performing power kicks in empty space. You don't worry so much about hurting your knee during a snap or losing balance during a thrust or follow-through kick. It also naturally encourages you to apply more ...


1

There are several aspects you should work on. Core strength is vital for front kick (mae geri in Karate). This is because you need to balance throughout the move from start to finish. Do some plank exercises and press-ups with good form (flat back). Pilates too, belive it or not, for deep-lying core muscles. Chamber the knee as high as you can - this gives ...



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