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6

Improve your leg Strength. Do this first because it feeds into any activity requiring balance. Try: Hindu squats. These are great because they have you coming up on the ball of your foot while squatting low. Dynamic/Plyometric squats. For example, box-jumping. It's simple, just get a crate or some of those stackable aerobics platforms. Squat and jump ...


6

National Geographic did a fight science segment on martial arts kicks, featuring karate, tae kwon do and muay thai against capoeira. I was a little disappointed, in that they had Simon Rhee (karate) doing a front kick. Just because of the angles, motion and muscle involvement you will never get a front kick that outperforms a round or side kick. (Especially ...


6

The short answer is that you should land it when all your opponent's weight is on that leg. Either while kicking, or leaning forward. Just know that kicking close to the knee while your opponent is performing a kick has a big chance of dislocation his knee and screwing it up for the rest of his life. Which is one of the reasons I had to retire from serious ...


5

Anderson Silva, an MMA fighter with a muay Thai background, has executed low-kick catches in the UFC against Chael Sonnen (to an inside leg kick, no less) and James Irvin, as described in this Judo Chop article. The James Irvin kick catch was simply spectacular, and seems like it would apply well to strict MT competition as well. (Note that the Irvin kick ...


4

Attempting such a kick is one thing, but given how easily the opponent can pull push or twist you with the leg they're holding, and all the ways in which your attempted kick might miss or make more or less contact than hoped, it's very presumptuous to assume anything about how you'll land afterwards let alone "fall with the hands to the floor and bring your ...


4

The legality of the move has already been answered by Juann and others in the comments. Even if it was legal, this would be a poor option. If a Muay Thai opponent grabs your leg (catches your kick), the next thing they are going to do is smash the thigh of your supporting leg. They are not going to give you a moment to start launching your own convoluted ...


4

zhan zhuang or stand like a post. (the article is rather terse, but the references at the bottom will probably be helpful. I'm not sure this is a skill I'd want to learn from the internet, but any practitioner of Chinese martial arts should be able to help you with the basics. You need to improve your stabilizers - the muscles that surround your ankles ...


3

If the kick is slow enough or sloppy enough to be caught, then yes you should catch it. Why not - it's there for the taking. In a non-tournament situation (i.e. real life) catching a kick should mean fight over. When shouldn't you catch a kick? When you run the risk of breaking your arm by getting it in the way, or you become vulnerable to further ...


3

A simple practical exercise that will improve your kicking balance: Do straight leg kicks without ever setting the kicking leg down. You don't have to do them aggressively or high at first. Even a 30 or 45 degree kick is sufficient to start you off. But when the leg returns, either don't set it down, or do the lightest toe-touch possible. Gentle, ...


3

Yes kicking frequently on a target like a bag or a mitts will harden and make your shins harder. Just keep doing it frequent (at least 2 times a week, more would be better). A more extreme training method is to kick on car tires (some muay thai fighters are actually doing it). Yes, and good leg conditioning (running, jumping, weights, etc) in general will ...


3

Mentally, take a step back and think about what your performance of these techniques is like. If "poor balance" were specific to a kick or two I'd be worried about flexibility, but if it's pervasive through kata then it sounds like your mental focus and attitude to the technique is wrong. Think more about clean, minimal, precise movement, with the body ...


3

I'm not sure how "in Muay Thai" fits in; what differentiates a Muay Thai response from any other? Whether or not it's advisable to move in to the kick depends on many factors; obviously if you're not where the kick was targeted, the impact will be reduced, because physics. Legs can be grabbed for sweeps, but capturing a leg that's at head height isn't ...


3

Your master has been doing this stuff for several years (hopefully), so obviously he'll look better at it. It took me a good 6 months to be able to kick above my head and 2 years before I could do a full split. That didn't stop me from being successful in Taekwondo. You need more than just flexibility for high kicks though. You also need strong core ...


3

Trying to achieve a full split in just two months is an optimistic goal; I would expect it to take longer. my inner thighs and outer hips pain a lot. Immediately I would make a distinction between discomfort and pain. You should feel discomfort, but if you are feeling pain then you need to stop and re-evaluate what you are doing. Having discomfort in ...


2

I like to hit low kicks when my opponent is stepping forward, so as to disrupt their footing, or when my opponent is flat-footed and heavy on the lead leg, allowing me a stationary target so I can load up and do some damage. Another approach is to force the opponent to retreat, then attack the leg they leave behind, as Mauricio "Shogun" Rua did to Lyoto ...


2

Well...the one answering your questions are absolutely right. Low kicks are best used when most of your opponent's weight is on one leg, preferably when he/she is kicking at you. Jus' dodge the kick (by ducking if a high-kick or by side-stepping or moving out of range) and give a kick on his/her leg. If in a serious fight, hitting the back of the knee will ...


2

nothing but your feet may ever touch the mat. With that in mind, there is no kick you can perform that will have enough leverage to do any damage or even cause slight discomfort to your opponent. The only reasonable course of action here would be to punch him in the face until he lets go.


2

Slow kicks and slow leg raises. Balance is a feedback game - your proprioception and your muscle response. How fast you can sense your own balance, and how fast you can get your stabilizers to do the necessary micro adjustments in firing the correct muscles. When you balance or stabilize, it's not like your body turns on ALL of the stabilizers at once - ...


2

One thing that slows people down is putting tension on their blocking leg too early. The leg should stay very relaxed while moving up. Apply tension only in the moment before checking the incoming leg. One drill you can do for that is to do a couple of minutes of quickly lifting your knees as if to block after a long training. Because you are already ...


1

Full split in 2 months? Don't be so hard on yourself, it can take years. Then consider, is there really ever a need in a combat situation to kick that high? Seems like a flowery waste of energy to me.


1

jump rope . practice lunge steps with weight in hand. jump on a tire layed down on the ground, like them thai`s do. re-learn your foot work. try boxing foot work. move your feet to a beat or metronome and learn -practice to sync steps to the beat. push a bag-punching and practice chasing and escaping via stepping front-back. now give me 100 dollars ...


1

It's not because its easier for us, more just because, well, I don't know how to say it, other than that we love it. Martial arts. Knowing all of these really awesome and fancy ways to beat the crap out of someone. As for tricking, Your right. I haven't seen all that many girls in the sport. But that in no way shape or form means its not a womens sport. ...



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