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13

Height gives a considerable advantage to striking martial arts. The first and most obvious advantage is that height means you can reach out further than your opponent, meaning you can hit him before he hits you. But there are other advantages that you don't immediately consider: If you have to punch upwards towards a taller opponent's head, you don't ...


8

Is there a way to escape/ defend yourself from tornado kick? Ummm... yes. If there wasn't, all martial arts would only practice tornado kicks, but in fact relatively few martial arts use the technique. Those kicks are horribly telegraphed, which means the defender have a lot of warning and time to decide what to do to defend or counter-attack. ...


8

Unfortunately, some martial arts as practiced in the training hall are unsuitable for general use in street fights. The danger with high kicks is not just the surface as mentioned by cs1971, there are other factors too: high kicks are slower (they have further to travel) you are more vulnerable during the delivery and retraction stages of the kick ...


7

Karate and Tae Kwon Do have a lot of overlap. So many of the techniques will be very similar. However, the slight differences cause more issues as you get to a higher level. The best way to improve at something is usually to practice that thing. For kicking start low and make sure you are getting the technique right (it is more important that you generate ...


7

While "back kick" is mostly synonymous with "side kick" in most martial arts, there are styles that do have a back kick that is subtly but very significantly different than a side-kick. This is perhaps what you're picking up on. In a side kick, you will raise your leg up and inwards, chambering the kicking leg in a position whereby the kicking leg is ...


7

Chambering is an analogy drawn from firearms. In firearms, you chamber a round (put a bullet in the chamber). In the same way as you chamber a round in firearms, you can chamber a kick to "fire" it. This is very probably an American saying in martial arts. When one refers to chambering a technique (any technique, but in this case a kick), they mean fully ...


6

ROLLING THUNDER Kyokushin competition is also the home of the rolling thunder, or Do mawashi geri / Kaiten geri. Because of the rules it is relatively low risk, but tremendously high reward. Bouts are fought so close in, and so ferociously, that a quick push away is almost guaranteed to have the opponent lunging back in. And, if you've been trading body ...


6

One name it goes by in Japanese martial arts is Do Mawashi Kaiten Geri, sometimes known as the "forward roll axe kick". It does appear in other styles. In Capoeira, it's often referred to as an Aú Chibata and differs in that actually rolling, rather than springing forward on your hands, is considered to be bad form.


6

At least in boxing, height in and of itself doesn't give you an advantage. What gives the advantage to the taller boxer, assuming roughly equal levels of skill and experience, is greater reach. So the trick for the taller boxer becomes one of staying in the narrow zone where he can hit the other guy without being hit in return. In the specific example of ...


6

You shouldn't need to train in a different art to improve your flexibility. A fellow black-belt in TKD improved her kicking through regular stretching; she had a routine that she completed (possibly still completes!) several times a week. I'm afraid I don't know what her routine was, so I can't describe it for you; equally, the stretches that worked for her ...


6

The setup for one of these kicks is ridiculous, and I question if there is even a significant power difference between one and a well delivered roundhouse or side kick. I feel good footwork is the best defense, since anything except a stationary target is going to foil the effectiveness of execution. I'm a big, aggressive fighter, and I always step inside ...


5

Your shin can break if you kick someone very hard and they block just right and all conditions align against you. You can break your hand punching someone, even aiming to soft targets like the ribs. You can blow out your knee throwing someone with ouchigari. You can get concussed into unconsciousness taking someone down with a double-leg if they time their ...


5

To be honest I'm not really sure how you differentiate what you described from what you term as a "standard back kick". There can be a few ways to execute this kick, most of them are just variations on how to start it. You are quite correct that it is a very effective (and devastating) kick if executed correctly. But the reason why you never see the back ...


5

This is going to vary from individual to individual. What is going to matter most is one's training and comfort level. I don't advocate throwing a spinning jump kick when your life is on the line, but if you are a taekwondoin and you are really comfortable with busting out a roundhouse kick to your assailant's brainpan, then by all means do so. I have ...


4

I had similar thoughts. The issue is complicated. The best stretches are not what we would normally do on the dojo floor. They might work fine if you started as a toddler, and did them daily for the rest of your life, but they seem less effective as an adult. So, find a partner, and do "active stretching". There are loads of videos on the web for this ...


4

FWIW, after struggling similarly (and being given many different stretches and training methods to "fix" it) I had an MRI done and found out that my hips are formed in such a way that it is essentially impossible for me to kick above the mid-section from the side. No amount of training could ever overcome this. The only way to fix it would be to have my hip ...


4

If you feel like there is a greater chance of injury for 540 degree kicks over 360 degree kicks, that's good, because there is a greater chance of injury. If you want to develop techniques like a 540 degree spin kick, you have to understand this is a fact of life. The physics of rotation is a good place to start. Your moment of inertia is your resistance ...


4

The 540 kick causes a lot of problems for people who are confident with the 360. This is often due to starting with the opposite leg forward to the 360. As backwards as it may sound - practice the 180 kick this will get you more used to jumping with the kicking leg at the back. Progress that to a 360 reverse turning kick with the opposite leg. This will ...


4

One possible use for a high kick is intimidation. A high kick delivered cleanly is impressive-looking, and may convince other attackers to back off. That said, I'd only recommend it if you're really certain of your ability to pull it off, and to recover if it doesn't come off cleanly. Of course, there is another purpose to training high kicks, namely ...


3

Advantages You've guessed part of the equation. They are shocking to anyone who you manage to pull one off on. In addition, if the jump is going forward, you add all of your forward weight and momentum to the kick. Jumps also allow you to reach higher targets than you might be able to reach standing. Disadvantages Jump kicks telegraph quite a ...


3

Well.. They do shin conditioning prior to sparring. A weak shin will always tend to break if it's blocked with the knee or a stronger shin. So you should be careful when using your shin to kick. That's why most of the Muay Thai fighters tend to hit lower kicks aiming for outer thighs of the opponents which reduces the risk of damaging / breaking their shins. ...


3

First, arching the back has a positive effect of slightly increasing your reach during the kick, as the displacement of your upper body backwards allows you to thrust your hips forward that small amount. One martial art where you will see this significantly is Capoeira, where the traditional Benção, a front thrust kick, involves arching the back to increase ...


3

I have a couple suggestions for you on this issue: If you plan on using this for punches, kicks, knees, elbows, and possibly sword work I would suggest getting something like a kendo stick to do the sword work. Kendo Stick on Amazon This will help minimize any damage to the bag that would be caused by a bo staff or a dull sword but still give you the feel ...


3

Ice is no longer the darling of the medical community for reducing inflammation or bruising. Gabe Mirkin, MD, who apparently first coined the RICE mnemonic, has references on his blog dated March 2014 for why ice delays recovery from injury. The summary is ice reduces inflammation in the short term, but impairs the healing process.


3

Conditioning is one part of kicking safely with a shin to make it stronger gradually by damage/repair periods. However conditioning also teaches how to kick with your shin on an acute angle that will not hurt or break the shin. Also, the lower part of the shin should be used, close to the instep. This part is not as likely to break and some strapping or shin ...


3

Round Kick You're delivering the kick with the lower part your fibula. You would also block a low round kick by turning your fibula to meet the fibula of the opponent. The tibia, while potentially stronger than the fibula, is located on the posterior in relation to the Fibula. It would therefore be in no position to deliver a low round kick. Hook Kick ...


3

Outside the training hall the ground surface is unpredictable. Inside it's completely predictable, you can kick all day and on every step it'll behave the same. You can throw any kick you like and your supporting foot will remain planted. Exactly the same kick outside, on damp or dusty, or gritty, or whatever ground wearing whatever footwear, will put you on ...


3

If you can kick high, you can kick low. If you can kick high, then you have achieved good flexibility. So if you fall or otherwise end up being bent about, things are less likely to go snap. If you can kick high, and in a brief moment in the heat of a skirmish you see one brief opening in an otherwise strong guard, and that opening happens to be high, you ...


3

Basing this answer on a TaeKwonDo front kick With most things in life the best way to improve is to practice it. Breaking If you are looking to break with a front kick then technique is crucial. Ensure that your knee is coming up high (and then dropping slightly as the foot fires forward to make the foot travel straight). Make sure you are making ...


2

Ultimately, I went with another professional wrestling standby of hopping a half inch or so in the air and distributing my weight between the two feet. As a bonus, it also makes the stomp look a bit more vicious because I'm theoretically putting my whole body weight into it. I find myself wondering whether this problem actually does exist for martial use of ...



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