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11

Height gives a considerable advantage to striking martial arts. The first and most obvious advantage is that height means you can reach out further than your opponent, meaning you can hit him before he hits you. But there are other advantages that you don't immediately consider: If you have to punch upwards towards a taller opponent's head, you don't ...


7

While "back kick" is mostly synonymous with "side kick" in most martial arts, there are styles that do have a back kick that is subtly but very significantly different than a side-kick. This is perhaps what you're picking up on. In a side kick, you will raise your leg up and inwards, chambering the kicking leg in a position whereby the kicking leg is ...


6

National Geographic did a fight science segment on martial arts kicks, featuring karate, tae kwon do and muay thai against capoeira. I was a little disappointed, in that they had Simon Rhee (karate) doing a front kick. Just because of the angles, motion and muscle involvement you will never get a front kick that outperforms a round or side kick. (Especially ...


6

At least in boxing, height in and of itself doesn't give you an advantage. What gives the advantage to the taller boxer, assuming roughly equal levels of skill and experience, is greater reach. So the trick for the taller boxer becomes one of staying in the narrow zone where he can hit the other guy without being hit in return. In the specific example of ...


6

The short answer is that you should land it when all your opponent's weight is on that leg. Either while kicking, or leaning forward. Just know that kicking close to the knee while your opponent is performing a kick has a big chance of dislocation his knee and screwing it up for the rest of his life. Which is one of the reasons I had to retire from serious ...


5

Anderson Silva, an MMA fighter with a muay Thai background, has executed low-kick catches in the UFC against Chael Sonnen (to an inside leg kick, no less) and James Irvin, as described in this Judo Chop article. The James Irvin kick catch was simply spectacular, and seems like it would apply well to strict MT competition as well. (Note that the Irvin kick ...


4

Your master has been doing this stuff for several years (hopefully), so obviously he'll look better at it. It took me a good 6 months to be able to kick above my head and 2 years before I could do a full split. That didn't stop me from being successful in Taekwondo. You need more than just flexibility for high kicks though. You also need strong core ...


4

Attempting such a kick is one thing, but given how easily the opponent can pull push or twist you with the leg they're holding, and all the ways in which your attempted kick might miss or make more or less contact than hoped, it's very presumptuous to assume anything about how you'll land afterwards let alone "fall with the hands to the floor and bring your ...


4

The legality of the move has already been answered by Juann and others in the comments. Even if it was legal, this would be a poor option. If a Muay Thai opponent grabs your leg (catches your kick), the next thing they are going to do is smash the thigh of your supporting leg. They are not going to give you a moment to start launching your own convoluted ...


4

I've covered this briefly in another answer, but splits don't help kicks. You should, in around 6 weeks be able to achieve your maximum kicking height doing dynamic stretches (leg swings). Each morning, do between 1 to 3 sets of 10 leg swings to the front, side and back. You don't need to force this or feel pain, just swing until you can't swing any ...


3

I have a couple suggestions for you on this issue: If you plan on using this for punches, kicks, knees, elbows, and possibly sword work I would suggest getting something like a kendo stick to do the sword work. Kendo Stick on Amazon This will help minimize any damage to the bag that would be caused by a bo staff or a dull sword but still give you the feel ...


3

Ice is no longer the darling of the medical community for reducing inflammation or bruising. Gabe Mirkin, MD, who apparently first coined the RICE mnemonic, has references on his blog dated March 2014 for why ice delays recovery from injury. The summary is ice reduces inflammation in the short term, but impairs the healing process.


3

FWIW, after struggling similarly (and being given many different stretches and training methods to "fix" it) I had an MRI done and found out that my hips are formed in such a way that it is essentially impossible for me to kick above the mid-section from the side. No amount of training could ever overcome this. The only way to fix it would be to have my hip ...


3

If the kick is slow enough or sloppy enough to be caught, then yes you should catch it. Why not - it's there for the taking. In a non-tournament situation (i.e. real life) catching a kick should mean fight over. When shouldn't you catch a kick? When you run the risk of breaking your arm by getting it in the way, or you become vulnerable to further ...


3

Trying to achieve a full split in just two months is an optimistic goal; I would expect it to take longer. my inner thighs and outer hips pain a lot. Immediately I would make a distinction between discomfort and pain. You should feel discomfort, but if you are feeling pain then you need to stop and re-evaluate what you are doing. Having discomfort in ...


2

I like to hit low kicks when my opponent is stepping forward, so as to disrupt their footing, or when my opponent is flat-footed and heavy on the lead leg, allowing me a stationary target so I can load up and do some damage. Another approach is to force the opponent to retreat, then attack the leg they leave behind, as Mauricio "Shogun" Rua did to Lyoto ...


2

Well...the one answering your questions are absolutely right. Low kicks are best used when most of your opponent's weight is on one leg, preferably when he/she is kicking at you. Jus' dodge the kick (by ducking if a high-kick or by side-stepping or moving out of range) and give a kick on his/her leg. If in a serious fight, hitting the back of the knee will ...


2

nothing but your feet may ever touch the mat. With that in mind, there is no kick you can perform that will have enough leverage to do any damage or even cause slight discomfort to your opponent. The only reasonable course of action here would be to punch him in the face until he lets go.


2

I know this is an old question but I'm relatively new to this site and thought I could help. I can do a 180 degree split if it's front to back but it's still at times difficult to kick an opponent in the head with a roundhouse. What has helped me, believe it or not, is yoga, specifically a pose called pigeon. What this does is help get a deep stretch ...


1

Knockouts happen because of concussions, not how hard the foot, shin or hand striking the head is. Shin guards will hurt less, but will be just as effective at delivering a knockout. Use this info as you wish. This doesn't really answer your question, but it's useful information.


1

Some are spinning to face backwards and kicking with toes pointed down, hips pointed away from the target. Others are spinning 3/4 of the way around and then essentially doing a side kick, toes and hips pointed to the side. Is one of these more correct? Or are these two distinct kicks. From the perspecitive of any given style or school, whether one is ...


1

Me being a taller guy gives me a greater advantage with kicks, as seen in other answers it allows more reach and the ability to keep you opponent at bay. Now to gain advantage if you're shorter is to simply move in close and cut off their techniques. It is especially hard for a tall person to get a successful kick in if their opponent is up in their face. ...


1

Full split in 2 months? Don't be so hard on yourself, it can take years. Then consider, is there really ever a need in a combat situation to kick that high? Seems like a flowery waste of energy to me.


1

I'm a trained MMA fighter that has focused in Muay Thai and Boxing and let me tell you while the inside leg kick doesn't look like much it certainly adds up and hurts like hell after a while. The purpose of them is to take away your opponent's base and while they may still be able to stand on that leg it certainly affects their power significantly. Also, as ...



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