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11

At first glance Krav Maga and Systema seem to be very similar in that they are both very unconventional, no-rules, practical self-defence, martial arts (although Krav isn't technically a martial art) which are no holds barred and generally formless. However... Krav Maga is basically a very raw, dangerous situation survival system (including avoidance and ...


9

One class a week is basically nothing. On that schedule, nearly everybody progresses at a snail's pace and takes years to achieve even basic proficiency in the material. You'll forget more from week to week than you'll remember. Two classes a week is the minimum to make progress. Three or more is recommended for actually picking up the movements.


8

There are pros and cons to only going once a week vs. twice a week. Because of this I am going to set up a list. Going Once a Week Pros You won't learn the system very fast, so it gives you more to do in the long run. You will find every week a challenge! Cons You won't learn the system very fast or effectively. You will find ...


5

This is a standard exercise in Shodokan Aikido (required for every test). We call it either "Randori" or "Jiyu Waza". We don't standardize it the way you're asking. (In Chinese martial arts, the term may be Sanshou, but I'm not sure that is standardized. Closer to Kumite) My school used to do 4 attackers, 90 seconds, with each attacker starting their ...


4

Things that recommend Wing Chun to a sailor: It is sometimes commented that Wing Chun is best suited for fighting in a telephone booth. This is not so far from the truth. Wing Chun specializes in close-quarters tactics at bent-arm range/trapping range (though I assure you it does possess long-range techniques and tactics). This would be well-suited to ...


3

In a broad way, you can divide martial arts training into contact-focused or non-contact focused. Krav Maga, being primarily designed for defense, is contact-focused, and you're going to learn the most from working with partners. Unless you plan on training with friends outside of class, learning is going to be slow. People try to come up with ...


3

It sounds to me like you're describing a phenomenon whereby you experience a larger than expected amount of bruising and pain given the light contact you're being exposed to. This surprised you enough to see a medical doctor, which tells me you're probably experiencing something real, as opposed to just being a hypercondriac. Of course, it could still be ...


3

Bruises and light muscle strains resolve after about a week. This is far too long for a mild injury. If it's a bone bruise, the expected healing time is about 2-3 months, provided you're taking it easy and not continuing to subject it to additional trauma. Feeling the pain on the opposite side means it could be a skeletal issue - your ribs connect at the ...


3

That drill exists in a lot of different martial arts, each of which have tailored it to their unique style. I think each style calls it something different, and some don't call it anything at all, so you might be out of luck there. Schools with a penchant for the dramatic will probably call it "circle of death" or something like that (I'm looking at you, ...


2

The short answer is yes, but you should not take legal advice from people on the internet. The long answer is, you should really talk to a lawyer if you have questions about self-defense. Jails are full of people who thought they were acting in self-defense, but crossed the thin line at some point because they didn't know what exactly it means, like you. ...


2

I have studied Krav Maga for a few years and yes, there are "differences" between civilian and military Krav Maga. The civilian techniques focus on self defense while the military techniques focus more on killing other people. The techniques are not more advanced or more "higher-end" or anything like that. There are only more of them with a different focus. ...


2

I reckon, to set the foundation for anything (Martial Arts or anything really) you need about 100 hours of dedicated training (As suggested by the other answers above). Divide that over any number of weeks and sessions you want, it doesn't all have to be with an instructor, but the 100 hours should be relatively focussed on the art itself, and not the ...


1

Krav Maga has no competitive aspect, as the rules of competitive fighting would be incompatible with many techniques, but to answer your question, the Krav Maga taught to civilians around the world is the sports-oriented version of Krav Maga. There's a lot of marketing rhetoric about how deadly and effective Krav Maga is, and practitioners and instructors ...


1

Good answers already, but I'll dump some thoughts here too... if you allow any rest between the attacks - or even enough time for the (nominal) defender to return to a guarding position, then in one sense they're facing a series of one-on-one challenges rather than facing concurrent opponents, but there are still many benefits that make it a worthwhile ...



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