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12

To quote wikipedia "Aside from a few very well known systems, such as Xiao Hong Quan, the Da Hong Quan, Yin Shou Gun, Damo Sword, etc., after the loss of records during the 20th Century Cultural Revolution it would be almost impossible for a particular style to conclusively establish a connection to the Temple." The shaolin.com website claims ...


10

Bowing in Kung-Fu will take various different forms; not surprising as there are hundreds, if not thousands, of individual styles from various families and various regions all throughout China. In China, bowing (especially the traditional kowtow) serves as a sign of reverence. Modernly (following Imperialisms decline in China), the kowtow has been replaced ...


7

It is important to recognise that the vast majority of styles and variations may have never been documented at all, with every little remote village possibly having some knowledge passed down from generation to generation. The Shaolin Temple merely happened to be a gathering place with a strong enough tradition of formally collecting this type of knowledge. ...


7

What you are asking for is a tall order. If you live on the ground floor, noise issues are more easily addressed because you don't have to worry about impact noises with the floor. Impact noises are the hardest to control, and they radiate through rigid structures like floor joists rather well. I have no affiliation with the site, but there are a great ...


7

There are a few things you might try. I will mention up front that this is from a Hapkido perspective, and if you have a variation of the stance that isn't quite the same this won't perfectly fit. The wushu horse stances I've seen are similar to ours, except that you tend to go much deeper than we usually emphasize. Let's look at the basic elements of a ...


7

Depending on your chosen style, going for a 90 degrees angle right from the start may not be the proper position for the horse stance. In shorinji-ryu karatedo, for instance, we usually go for about 45 degrees with the knees about shoulder width. Although we eventually end up going lower as a training exercise to build leg strength, we don't advocate doing ...


6

The claim From Kalaripayattu Bangalore's website: Marmas are the specific points in the body where the application of pressure or insertion of needles (Bhedan karma) will effect the flow of vital energy or Prana along a complex system of subtle channels calls Naadis. A knowledge of such specific points is called Marma Shastra. Marmam has three ...


6

I've only started practicing Payattu*, and the students did try to convince me that such a technique exists. Of course there is no way laws of physics can be bent in such a manner, this technique is a myth. I did try to find out where these stories came from. First you have to understand that Payattu is thousands of years old (9th century CE). This ...


5

I have two methods I rely on when I become a counter-puncher (or counter-thrower, or passive grappler). The first is to simply attack constantly. You will become tired. That's okay, you'll get in better condition. You will make mistakes. That's okay, mistakes are what practice is for. Start every round (against competent, non-noob partners) with an ...


5

Postures encode a lot more than the obvious. Sometimes you'll find yourself in the middle of sparring, and you flow through a posture you've trained before. "Oh! I just did X! I didn't know I can use it like that!" Striking and blocking are the most obvious application. The next layer beneath that relates to what you can do when you grab or use joint locks. ...


5

In Shaolin Kung Fu, that is actually a combination of a few different moves. Forms will typically encode movements in combinations like this, for multiple reasons. One, it makes it easier to remember large amounts of moves, as forms were typically used to preserve techniques where handwritten manuals weren't sufficient. Also, when fighting in real life, you ...


4

Yes. There are many different forms of kung fu and some do certainly contain techniques reminiscent of the roundhouse kick. I studied a system called Northern Shaolin Kung Fu Wu Su and one of the kicks we were taught was called the "bow leg kick". It had all the elements of a roundhouse kick. From in stance, you would pivot onto one leg so you are facing ...


4

From what you describe, it sounds like the problem you have is maintaining your balance using other parts of your body other than your arms. While your arms and hands will bear the weight while in a handstand, you should also focus on using your core strength (abs and back) to hold yourself up. The idea is similar to standing up straight on your feet and ...


4

I do: Increase your arms and torso Strength. Work on your wrists. Strength and flexibility. You have to increase your body constrictive Strength. (to keep your body hard, independant of the position. Find out your balance point while upside down. During a handstand, Try to push the ground and at the same time do not let your gravity center to raise. Work ...


4

I believe most of people have ingrained into system a social unwritten law. We do not hurting other people. The law is unconscious and generally it is a good thing. Fighting systems do teach how to go over the psychical restriction, or I should rather say fighting systems should do it. Your problem is common and you need to work on it. I remember the first ...


4

Interesting... I very much like @DaveLiepmann's answer, and agree with his message if not always his way of saying it. I do want to expand a little on it. Reality vs. Non-Reality Without getting into hundreds of years (Possibly thousands) of philosophical debate on what is and what is not real, let's consider Objective vs. Subjective reality. For ...


3

You could try to focus on counter attacks for a while. As soon as you receive a kick (and preferably block it) you immediately answer it with a kick on your own. This helps your reflexes, may catch you opponent off-guard and -most importantly- you don't have to think about when might be a good time for an attack: your opponent gives you the command for ...


3

The technique depicted in this picture is called "mantis spies the cave" in 7 Star Praying mantis style.The right hand would be pulling an apponent into your space while the back of the left wrist is striking the face.The stance as you have said is Seven Star Stance and is used to signify a low sweep/stomp on the toe with heel/hooking into an apponents leg ...


3

To add to one of the answers, blocks in two different directions, such as the mountain block in Taegeuk pal-jang, make sense in the case of defending against multiple attackers. If there are multiple threats, then you have reason to defend yourself in different directions. You'll also see some weapon forms taking a similar stance to create a longer block ...


3

Why is a technique included or not included in a style? What was the terrain like in the area where the style was born? Swamps, mountains, plains, rivers, beaches, all these things will influence the available techniques. What was the founder like? Tall? Flexible? Strong? Wide of shoulders? Big-bellied? Did he have arms the size of tree trunks? This will ...


3

Everyone is talking about strength… good but unnecessary. It is good to have strong arms—and I am pretty sure you already do—to hold you up upside-down. But if you have the wrong technique, strength will always fail. If not, how does water continually seep into rocks when rocks have spent all their evolution perfecting the art of hardness? The key/idea ...


3

Northern styles have more legwork, acrobatics, and jumping moves. Contrastly, Southern Chinese kung fu systems focus more on short moves and stable stances. Actually, that describes the differences between the unarmed techniques, to an extent the weapons forms are the other way around. The way I heard it (at least 20 years ago, and I have forgotten the ...


3

To supplement the above info, a few styles (of Southern Shaolin arts) that may have been left out: TaiZu Quan (grand Ancestor Fists) LuoHan Quan (Bhoddidarma) WuMei Quan Southern Mantis TaiZu is supposedly founded by the Southern Sung emperor. t was 'designed' for military use, i.e.: smile and effective. It is based on the principle of using the arms as ...


3

The history regarding the Shaolin temple is very muddy due to the fact that when the temple was being destroyed, so were many of its records and etc. As for research being Chinese only, you do have to remember that many of these far east countries (China, Japan, Korea) have all been fairly closed up until the 1900's. I mean there are barely any records of ...


3

To answer some of the points raised in the original post: Was the Southern Shaolin Temple real and if so which location is valid? I do not have an exact date, but from our oral history, it was destroyed by the Ching army, so that puts it in the range of about 400yrs! There's also a theory that there was a bunch of smaller, scattered temples instead of one ...


2

Every time I've ever done a butterfly kick, I've arched my back. I've found that if I let my back be straight or slightly rounded, my hips drop and I lose the height needed to keep my body elevated enough for the kick to completely finish. Unless your sifu specifically says otherwise, I'd go with what feels comfortable and allows you to complete the kick. I ...


2

Yes, of course. ALL kicks that are practiced in every other form of martial art, exist in the gung-fu family of arts somewhere. In the system that I learned, it has all kicks whether standing, jumping, spinning, ground kicks and more. Though individual styles will be limited in kicks and/or punches and other strikes as that is simply part of what makes a ...


2

I have not trained in Seven Star Praying Mantis; I will defer to anyone with even a modicum of specific knowledge. I also admit my ignorance with respect to the hand position. I can state that within Tai Chi there are several stances that are backweighted like that, and where the heel is down and the toe is up. When I came to tai chi from aikido that ...


2

There are a few things at issue here: Space - If space is at a minimum, typically I would look at wall mounting. In this case, you're looking at a cabinet with a glass or perspex front. A long wall may be required for pole arms, but typically you're looking at 3" deep hooks to support the item, which would mean you'd want a 4-5" deep frame. I would ...


2

In general a slightly modified shadow box (like one that used to display war medals) might work depending on the size/kind of weapons. If money is not an object, I would suggest commissioning one from a carpenter who can also set in glass. In terms of protecting and preserving the weapons, the case alone will not be enough. The weapons will need to be ...



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