Hot answers tagged

23

Kung-Fu fighters pop up from time to time in MMA style fights. Early on in the UFC, there were a small number of kung-fu fighters. But by the end of its first year, you didn't see any. Why? Well there's a reason for that. The first UFC's were open to all. They were very much about putting style vs. style. So they had karate, Taekwondo, kung-fu, wing-chun, ...


12

Height gives a considerable advantage to striking martial arts. The first and most obvious advantage is that height means you can reach out further than your opponent, meaning you can hit him before he hits you. But there are other advantages that you don't immediately consider: If you have to punch upwards towards a taller opponent's head, you don't ...


11

KUNG FU, MMA, and UFC Roy Nelson, a top tier UFC fighter, commented on his kung fu background: The Lohan school of Shaolin, I actually got started in my Sifu’s garage. I think I was 15 1/2, 16. Kung-fu is the root for I would say 95% of all martial arts. I practice it every day. (With Sticky Hands) basically you’re just working with their body ...


11

Sanshou (similar to sanda) is a major competitive outlet for kung fu styles, allowing kicks, punches, kick catches, and throws. Several fighters with sanshou experience have fought in the UFC, most notably Cung Le. Zhang Tiequan appears to also have some sanshou experience, but today seems to fight primarily as a grappler. There are a small number of kung ...


9

Well the short answer is: Why not try it for a month and see whether or not it's something you're capable of doing? Because you won't know until you try. One of the main concerns of practicing more than one style at a time is that you might confuse them, and it will annoy your teachers as well as perhaps slowing your progress. This is a bigger concern for ...


8

Disclaimer: I've spent too much time over thinking the differences between Japanese and Chinese martial arts To quote Bruce Lee's opinion on the styles, getting hit by a Karate punch is like getting hit by a crowbar, while getting hit by a Kung Fu punch is like getting hit by a ball on a chain. Both hurt. You don't want to be on the receiving end of ...


7

There are all kinds of places on the body where fighters can get hit (the nose, the jaw, the solar plexus, the thigh, the liver, the kidneys, etc.), and each one of those triggers not just pain but subconscious, automatic physical reactions and altered psychological states. The pain is really the least of anyone's problems in this situation. It's the other ...


6

At least in boxing, height in and of itself doesn't give you an advantage. What gives the advantage to the taller boxer, assuming roughly equal levels of skill and experience, is greater reach. So the trick for the taller boxer becomes one of staying in the narrow zone where he can hit the other guy without being hit in return. In the specific example of ...


6

I've covered this briefly in another answer, but splits don't help kicks. You should, in around 6 weeks be able to achieve your maximum kicking height doing dynamic stretches (leg swings). Each morning, do between 1 to 3 sets of 10 leg swings to the front, side and back. You don't need to force this or feel pain, just swing until you can't swing any ...


6

Quite simply, you are no longer transferring power once the kick has landed. Therefore it is pointless to leave the leg out there - unless you are either posing or looking to burn a bit more energy. I would always advise to retract the leg as soon as practical. If someone left a kick hanging out I would gladly catch it and use it to my advantage. The same ...


6

Catching a kick is a common technique in Muay Thai and a major part of san da/san shou (Chinese kickboxing). In Muay Thai, I've seen lots of kicking out or sweeping the other leg. This clip teaches one method, and the video ends with clips of competition applications against opponents doing their best to stay standing. Other techniques I've seen in that art ...


6

There's no one "technique" here, there's a lot of techniques and principles and all of them are absolutely dependent on the situation and specific. Run Being outnumbered, and against knives, escape is the best option. If you cannot leave the vicinity, the next best option is to get something between you and your attackers - preferably walls and a locked ...


5

It is the same as asking if you can learn a language without having conversations with real people. In a sense, yes, you can learn to read and write that language from books and instruction. But you'll be in for a heck of a big surprise if dropped into a city where people speak that language for real -- everybody will talk so much faster than you imagined ...


5

If I fought Muay Thai I'd want to work slowly and carefully towards a double bodyweight deadlift using sets of 1 to 5, staying on the higher end of that range whenever possible. A set of 5 is picking up the weight five times without taking more than a couple seconds between repetitions. Personally I usually program deadlifts as a bunch of warm-up sets, ...


5

There's two things that increase stamina: cardio (fast, regular movement) and muscle endurance. Pretty much any regular movement can do that - Shaolin training or anything else. You can do a few minutes every day up to the recommended at least 30 minutes of cardio that doctors recommend, and of course, more once you get the endurance going. Understand ...


5

Your master has been doing this stuff for several years (hopefully), so obviously he'll look better at it. It took me a good 6 months to be able to kick above my head and 2 years before I could do a full split. That didn't stop me from being successful in Taekwondo. You need more than just flexibility for high kicks though. You also need strong core ...


4

Trying to achieve a full split in just two months is an optimistic goal; I would expect it to take longer. my inner thighs and outer hips pain a lot. Immediately I would make a distinction between discomfort and pain. You should feel discomfort, but if you are feeling pain then you need to stop and re-evaluate what you are doing. Having discomfort in ...


4

Some pointers: Train explosive power not just strength. Avoid getting too big. It will slow you down. Never forget to stretch the muscles you trained. During workout you perform contraction after contraction, your muscles are left in a shortened state. Which is bad thing if you train not only for looks but to actualy use it. Stretching helps to reset ...


4

I teach Kyokushin karate and I've taught the many different ways a roundhouse kick can be executed. However these can be boiled by 2 different characteristics: the striking area (i.e. Ball of feet, instep and lower shin) and the power mechanics. With power mechanics there are 3 distinct forms: 1st the TKD style where the leg is brought up vertically like ...


4

FWIW, after struggling similarly (and being given many different stretches and training methods to "fix" it) I had an MRI done and found out that my hips are formed in such a way that it is essentially impossible for me to kick above the mid-section from the side. No amount of training could ever overcome this. The only way to fix it would be to have my hip ...


4

In general terms these are the ways I've dealt with different kinds of pain: Soreness: Warm Baths Massaging the sore area Stretching gently after an easy warmup After small injuries from punches or sprains Apply cold (in form of an ice pack) the day of injury, subsequent days apply warm (you can use a zip-lock bag with warm wather inside, covered by a ...


4

You've got a pretty big list of goals there, and you can probably find a teacher or school that will hit 60% of them. Getting them all at once might be tough. That said, NYC has a pretty large martial arts community, so once you get into a decent school, you might find other schools or teachers who better fit your needs. Your Knee Your knee, actually ...


4

Because you have asked specifically about Chinese martial arts and have mentioned wushu, I think it's important to understand how what you want matches up to what is offered in the modern landscape of Chinese martial arts in the US. I would first distinguish between two categories: modern wushu and traditional martial arts. The two questions I would use to ...


4

Yes. Dozens. Probably hundreds. Tomiki Aikido regularly practices defense against knife attack; students are required to defend against knife attack at every test. Students are also required to defend against multiple attackers at every test. There are several kata that focus on defense against knife (Koryu dai san no kata in particular includes at ...


3

I know this is an old question but I'm relatively new to this site and thought I could help. I can do a 180 degree split if it's front to back but it's still at times difficult to kick an opponent in the head with a roundhouse. What has helped me, believe it or not, is yoga, specifically a pose called pigeon. What this does is help get a deep stretch ...


3

There's truth to both sides - it's a spectrum. You want to commit more and hit harder when you believe you're going to make meaningful contact and - with the impact factored in - the opponent won't be able to exploit your slower recovery time. If you're wrong, and the opponent slips or comfortably weathers the attack and counters, you'll be in a worse ...


3

The short answer, is you will learn a martial art, but will be unable to fight effectively. This is based on personal experience and backed up by a few authors. This is based on the fact I learned more from boxing and judo (both full contact arts that focused on getting in front of another person) in a few months than I did from 10 years of Karate (and that ...


3

You get used to it after a while. That's all there is to it. If you get hit enough times, you stop being afraid of it. The fear of getting hit is much worse than getting hit itself. Also, when the adrenalin is flowing you don't really feel pain. I finished (and won) a fight with a broken collarbone which I thought was just a slight sprain. It hurt like a ...


3

How you respond will depend on what kind of fight you are in. Kick opponent in groin. This is obviously not something you do to friendly sparring partners. Kick opponent in supporting leg knee. This may cause serious damage to the joint, so it is also not something you should do to friendly sparring partners. Sweep supporting leg. Assuming your partner ...


2

There are current IWUF text books/dvd available from Kungfudirect.com, the material is written in Chinese however it should cover what you are looking for. Peace, Love, Wushu!



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible