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11

Your question isn't what you are really asking. Your question is "Can I learn Kung Fu without sparring", and that answer is yes. Sparring is not 100% necessary to learn any art. You can learn all the kicks, punches, blocks, stances and so forth without ever facing anything more than a heavy bag or possibly a human holding a pad/shield. What you really want ...


10

Can anyone learn martial arts techniques without sparring? Sure! I mean, you can learn that they exist. Can you learn how to effectively apply martial arts techniques without sparring? Oh, no. Gosh no. No, no, no. Nope. Sparring is how we turn things we know of into things we know how. Until you can do it in sparring it's all a bunch of theory. Not ...


9

I have not been impressed with the stories I hear from people who have gone to these Asian martial arts retreats. These camps seem like a way to separate Westerners from their money while providing a bare minimum of services. Much like the explosion of "teacher training" yoga retreats, they provide an experience, not an education. First-Person Accounts ...


7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


7

It will be pretty difficult to do Judo alone. You can practice kung fu or any other martial art with forms (pre-arranged patterns) by yourself though. If you don't already know the martial art, though, you're setting yourself up for failure. Save yourself and any future teacher a few headaches and don't try to learn from DVDs or Youtube. Don't get me ...


6

Yes, I've been to China to train at the Shaolin temple at Songshan mountain in Dengfeng, Henan, China. I did this only for a couple of weeks, mostly just for fun. My wife (then girlfriend) was training at a school in Houston where the head instructor was an actual Shaolin monk who had moved to the U.S. to start up a school. So the monk offered to arrange ...


6

I know one person who went to train in bagua and tai chi. He went to a relatively small training camp, got some good basic skills. But. That was 6 months of his life spent doing nothing but martial arts training. A lot of that was conditioning. Although he got a good set of basic skills, I can't say it'd be much different than if he spent the time here, ...


5

I think a good analogy is that sparring is to martial arts training as internships/work placement is to job-focused education, in that it gives you a taste of what the "real world" is like. You can learn a lot hitting a bag (just like you can learn a lot in school), but ultimately there is only so much that you can learn there compared to sparring with a ...


5

Your option to learn new things is pretty limited. Forms have some, limited value Since you've mentioned kung fu as one of the directions you might go, there's plenty of video online of various forms and lots of books to back it up that you can do. This might help you develop leg strength and coordination, but your options for learning how it ...


4

Not all nerves do the same thing! So, here's a thing: not all nerves do the same thing, and you can deaden the pain nerves without losing movement sensitivity. Movement sensitivity is primarily from proprioception, much of which the nerves that you'd be using measure the length of your muscle spindles and how fast they're being contracted/lengthened. ...


4

The primary reason why people bang up their limbs (arms, legs, elbows, knees, and head) is to be able to lessen the pain of the impact. Secondarily, by lessening the pain, the body is able to make mechanical adaptations to improve the power of the strike. First with regards to the pain lessening... While I do believe this does deaden the nervous system's ...


4

To supplement the above info, a few styles (of Southern Shaolin arts) that may have been left out: TaiZu Quan (grand Ancestor Fists) LuoHan Quan (Bhoddidarma) WuMei Quan Southern Mantis TaiZu is supposedly founded by the Southern Sung emperor. t was 'designed' for military use, i.e.: smile and effective. It is based on the principle of using the arms as ...


4

I had a Trig professor in college who asked us on day one, "What do math and sex have in common?" The answer was, "You cannot learn them through reading about them in books, and you cannot learn them through watching other people do it. You can only learn them through participation." Martial arts is so varied that one has to first ask, "What do you want to ...


3

No. Are you learning to throw punches and kicks, or are you learning to fight? You always need to spare with someone to learn how to fight. How could a boxer be a champion if he never boxed with anyone? Martial arts is not just about throwing punches and kicks, it's also about quickly adapting to your opponents move and style. If you never sparred with ...


3

If you want to learn Kung Fu, you probably want listen to the Shaolin Monk. If you want to learn how to defend yourself, you'll need to know how to fight, and you need sparring to do so. Sparring practices staying calm and collected in a intense situation. Plus it's fun. As to whether or not Kung Fu is an effective form of defence, that's another topic. ...


3

I think that the key to finding an answer (as is often the case) lies within formulating properly the question. Learning "kung fu" by itself is difficult to define, since basically kung fu means simply being highly skilled in something (as compared to wushu which is the actual fighting training). But, to get closer to your question, how do you actually ...


3

I don't have any references, only anecdotes from instructors I've trained with, so please do not mistake this as historically accurate information. The picture you show appears to be a variation on the 9 Ring Broadsword. This is supposed to have been a training weapon. The 9 Rings on the back of the blade provide a sound that assists the student in ...


3

To answer some of the points raised in the original post: Was the Southern Shaolin Temple real and if so which location is valid? I do not have an exact date, but from our oral history, it was destroyed by the Ching army, so that puts it in the range of about 400yrs! There's also a theory that there was a bunch of smaller, scattered temples instead of one ...


2

My wife got pretty far into contemporary wushu. She had good teachers, but one book she frequently turned to was Fundamentals of High Performance Wushu: Taolu Jumps and Spins by Raymond Wu. You can find it on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-High-Performance-Wushu-Taolu/dp/1430318201 It goes over a lot of the jumping and spinning techniques. The ...


2

There are many aspects to this. The most important things during training are: to pay extremely close attention to yourself and others, especially the instructor and senior students to contrast, analyse, reason about and research what you observe, then practice and target experimentation accordingly both for the results that brings and to identify further ...


2

I went with a standard free standing frame. I am on a 3rd floor apartment of an old colonial. The guy below me freaked out. I did a little research and started with a piece of 1/2 4 x 8 Homasote 440 soundboard. I cut it into 3 pieces. 2 of them are 66 in by about 24 inch the covered underneath the framework of the dummy and the front leg. I then went a piece ...


2

I think the previous answers are correct and well thought out. However, I think the answer is really No on all counts a Martial art is just that if you don't use it as intended you don't really know it. You have to use it in a real world way. There are many levels of knowledge really, yes you can learn the mechanics of a technique but to break through to ...


1

First of all, what do you mean by "learning martial arts"? What level of mastery are you hoping to achieve? Let me put it this way, if you train with a punching bag for 10 years and learn all the techniques, then can you defend yourself against someone your size on the street? YES, of course? Mathematically speaking, someone will practiced on a punching bag ...


1

Depending on what style of "kung fu" you want to learn, this may be possible to some extent (at least you might be able to land a surprise punch and run, which isn't the worst survival strategy to be honest), but in some styles it will be outright impossible. For example, in Wing Tsun, being able to apply the Chi Sao ("sticky hands") is one of the most ...


1

There's been some pretty good scholarship and interest in the Dadao recently. There's a few forms or methods which have managed to be incorporated/carried along with various forms of kung fu - here's some demonstrations from a Mantis kung fu school. Others are attempting to reconstruct Dadao movements from old military manuals. It's a bit difficult to ...


1

Funnily enough, I was just reading about this on BadMartialArts.com due to a different page's crosslink. They give a fairly comprehensive explanation of what's involved on a physiological level in conditioning. One of the major takeaways is that part of the conditioning is building up the muscles and learning to tense them properly against a blow to absorb ...


1

Depends greatly on the teacher's teaching style. Style #1: I've been in classes that were very structured and where we were constantly moving from one thing to the next. In those classes, we didn't have much time to worry about being disciplined. We simply did as instructed and we weren't left a lot of time to structure our class time for ourselves. ...


1

Frankly, the difference between mentally preparing for a martial art, or for any physically intensive activity is minor at best. You need to motivate yourself to do a lot of hard work, possibly painful work. Most people motivate themselves by visualizing their goals, but that may work against you, particularly since many people have unrealistic ideas of how ...


1

Taolu means "form" or "routine" in Mandarin in the same way that kata means "form" or "routine" in Japanese. Chang Quan means "long fist". Originally, this was probably a distinct style, but came to mean a general category of Northern Chinese martial arts that includes styles like Cha Quan, Mizong Quan, and Shaolin Quan. In general, you can tell that a ...


1

The Wikipedia page on the Southern Shaolin Monastery puts it beautifully: "The Southern Shaolin Monastery is the name of a Buddhist monastery whose existence and location are both disputed. By tradition it is considered the source of all southern Chinese martial arts. ... The following account is based on legend or folklore, with little, if any, documentary ...



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