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7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


7

It will be pretty difficult to do Judo alone. You can practice kung fu or any other martial art with forms (pre-arranged patterns) by yourself though. If you don't already know the martial art, though, you're setting yourself up for failure. Save yourself and any future teacher a few headaches and don't try to learn from DVDs or Youtube. Don't get me ...


5

Your option to learn new things is pretty limited. Forms have some, limited value Since you've mentioned kung fu as one of the directions you might go, there's plenty of video online of various forms and lots of books to back it up that you can do. This might help you develop leg strength and coordination, but your options for learning how it ...


4

Not all nerves do the same thing! So, here's a thing: not all nerves do the same thing, and you can deaden the pain nerves without losing movement sensitivity. Movement sensitivity is primarily from proprioception, much of which the nerves that you'd be using measure the length of your muscle spindles and how fast they're being contracted/lengthened. ...


4

The primary reason why people bang up their limbs (arms, legs, elbows, knees, and head) is to be able to lessen the pain of the impact. Secondarily, by lessening the pain, the body is able to make mechanical adaptations to improve the power of the strike. First with regards to the pain lessening... While I do believe this does deaden the nervous system's ...


4

To supplement the above info, a few styles (of Southern Shaolin arts) that may have been left out: TaiZu Quan (grand Ancestor Fists) LuoHan Quan (Bhoddidarma) WuMei Quan Southern Mantis TaiZu is supposedly founded by the Southern Sung emperor. t was 'designed' for military use, i.e.: smile and effective. It is based on the principle of using the arms as ...


3

To answer some of the points raised in the original post: Was the Southern Shaolin Temple real and if so which location is valid? I do not have an exact date, but from our oral history, it was destroyed by the Ching army, so that puts it in the range of about 400yrs! There's also a theory that there was a bunch of smaller, scattered temples instead of one ...


3

I don't have any references, only anecdotes from instructors I've trained with, so please do not mistake this as historically accurate information. The picture you show appears to be a variation on the 9 Ring Broadsword. This is supposed to have been a training weapon. The 9 Rings on the back of the blade provide a sound that assists the student in ...


2

Yes, of course. ALL kicks that are practiced in every other form of martial art, exist in the gung-fu family of arts somewhere. In the system that I learned, it has all kicks whether standing, jumping, spinning, ground kicks and more. Though individual styles will be limited in kicks and/or punches and other strikes as that is simply part of what makes a ...


2

My wife got pretty far into contemporary wushu. She had good teachers, but one book she frequently turned to was Fundamentals of High Performance Wushu: Taolu Jumps and Spins by Raymond Wu. You can find it on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-High-Performance-Wushu-Taolu/dp/1430318201 It goes over a lot of the jumping and spinning techniques. The ...


2

There are many aspects to this. The most important things during training are: to pay extremely close attention to yourself and others, especially the instructor and senior students to contrast, analyse, reason about and research what you observe, then practice and target experimentation accordingly both for the results that brings and to identify further ...


1

The Wikipedia page on the Southern Shaolin Monastery puts it beautifully: "The Southern Shaolin Monastery is the name of a Buddhist monastery whose existence and location are both disputed. By tradition it is considered the source of all southern Chinese martial arts. ... The following account is based on legend or folklore, with little, if any, documentary ...


1

Funnily enough, I was just reading about this on BadMartialArts.com due to a different page's crosslink. They give a fairly comprehensive explanation of what's involved on a physiological level in conditioning. One of the major takeaways is that part of the conditioning is building up the muscles and learning to tense them properly against a blow to absorb ...


1

Depends greatly on the teacher's teaching style. Style #1: I've been in classes that were very structured and where we were constantly moving from one thing to the next. In those classes, we didn't have much time to worry about being disciplined. We simply did as instructed and we weren't left a lot of time to structure our class time for ourselves. ...


1

Frankly, the difference between mentally preparing for a martial art, or for any physically intensive activity is minor at best. You need to motivate yourself to do a lot of hard work, possibly painful work. Most people motivate themselves by visualizing their goals, but that may work against you, particularly since many people have unrealistic ideas of how ...


1

Taolu means "form" or "routine" in Mandarin in the same way that kata means "form" or "routine" in Japanese. Chang Quan means "long fist". Originally, this was probably a distinct style, but came to mean a general category of Northern Chinese martial arts that includes styles like Cha Quan, Mizong Quan, and Shaolin Quan. In general, you can tell that a ...



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