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15

Your question isn't what you are really asking. Your question is "Can I learn Kung Fu without sparring", and that answer is yes. Sparring is not 100% necessary to learn any art. You can learn all the kicks, punches, blocks, stances and so forth without ever facing anything more than a heavy bag or possibly a human holding a pad/shield. What you really want ...


15

Kung-Fu fighters pop up from time to time in MMA style fights. Early on in the UFC, there were a small number of kung-fu fighters. But by the end of its first year, you didn't see any. Why? Well there's a reason for that. The first UFC's were open to all. They were very much about putting style vs. style. So they had karate, Taekwondo, kung-fu, wing-chun, ...


12

Can anyone learn martial arts techniques without sparring? Sure! I mean, you can learn that they exist. Can you learn how to effectively apply martial arts techniques without sparring? Oh, no. Gosh no. No, no, no. Nope. Sparring is how we turn things we know of into things we know how. Until you can do it in sparring it's all a bunch of theory. Not ...


9

I have not been impressed with the stories I hear from people who have gone to these Asian martial arts retreats. These camps seem like a way to separate Westerners from their money while providing a bare minimum of services. Much like the explosion of "teacher training" yoga retreats, they provide an experience, not an education. First-Person Accounts ...


8

It will be pretty difficult to do Judo alone. You can practice kung fu or any other martial art with forms (pre-arranged patterns) by yourself though. If you don't already know the martial art, though, you're setting yourself up for failure. Save yourself and any future teacher a few headaches and don't try to learn from DVDs or Youtube. Don't get me ...


8

Sanshou (similar to sanda) is a major competitive outlet for kung fu styles, allowing kicks, punches, kick catches, and throws. Several fighters with sanshou experience have fought in the UFC, most notably Cung Le. Zhang Tiequan appears to also have some sanshou experience, but today seems to fight primarily as a grappler. There are a small number of kung ...


7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


6

Yes, I've been to China to train at the Shaolin temple at Songshan mountain in Dengfeng, Henan, China. I did this only for a couple of weeks, mostly just for fun. My wife (then girlfriend) was training at a school in Houston where the head instructor was an actual Shaolin monk who had moved to the U.S. to start up a school. So the monk offered to arrange ...


6

I know one person who went to train in bagua and tai chi. He went to a relatively small training camp, got some good basic skills. But. That was 6 months of his life spent doing nothing but martial arts training. A lot of that was conditioning. Although he got a good set of basic skills, I can't say it'd be much different than if he spent the time here, ...


5

I think a good analogy is that sparring is to martial arts training as internships/work placement is to job-focused education, in that it gives you a taste of what the "real world" is like. You can learn a lot hitting a bag (just like you can learn a lot in school), but ultimately there is only so much that you can learn there compared to sparring with a ...


5

I had a Trig professor in college who asked us on day one, "What do math and sex have in common?" The answer was, "You cannot learn them through reading about them in books, and you cannot learn them through watching other people do it. You can only learn them through participation." Martial arts is so varied that one has to first ask, "What do you want to ...


5

Is a master always required to gain mastery over this martial art? Yes. If you try really hard you could get some basic ability yourself (from books, videos etc.), but to gain anything approaching mastery you need good instruction (and other skilled people to practice with). The simpler the style is technically the more you can teach yourself, so ...


5

What is the most effective method for the roundhouse kick? You've got a one-adjective criteria there, and a vague one: effective. Overall effectiveness might reasonably be defined as what helps you win reliably, or perhaps you'd prefer something less reliable if it meant the average or median injury you sustain is less even though the worst case ...


5

Your option to learn new things is pretty limited. Forms have some, limited value Since you've mentioned kung fu as one of the directions you might go, there's plenty of video online of various forms and lots of books to back it up that you can do. This might help you develop leg strength and coordination, but your options for learning how it ...


5

If I fought Muay Thai I'd want to work slowly and carefully towards a double bodyweight deadlift using sets of 1 to 5, staying on the higher end of that range whenever possible. A set of 5 is picking up the weight five times without taking more than a couple seconds between repetitions. Personally I usually program deadlifts as a bunch of warm-up sets, ...


5

There's two things that increase stamina: cardio (fast, regular movement) and muscle endurance. Pretty much any regular movement can do that - Shaolin training or anything else. You can do a few minutes every day up to the recommended at least 30 minutes of cardio that doctors recommend, and of course, more once you get the endurance going. Understand ...


4

Not all nerves do the same thing! So, here's a thing: not all nerves do the same thing, and you can deaden the pain nerves without losing movement sensitivity. Movement sensitivity is primarily from proprioception, much of which the nerves that you'd be using measure the length of your muscle spindles and how fast they're being contracted/lengthened. ...


4

The primary reason why people bang up their limbs (arms, legs, elbows, knees, and head) is to be able to lessen the pain of the impact. Secondarily, by lessening the pain, the body is able to make mechanical adaptations to improve the power of the strike. First with regards to the pain lessening... While I do believe this does deaden the nervous system's ...


4

No. Are you learning to throw punches and kicks, or are you learning to fight? You always need to spare with someone to learn how to fight. How could a boxer be a champion if he never boxed with anyone? Martial arts is not just about throwing punches and kicks, it's also about quickly adapting to your opponents move and style. If you never sparred with ...


4

It is the same as asking if you can learn a language without having conversations with real people. In a sense, yes, you can learn to read and write that language from books and instruction. But you'll be in for a heck of a big surprise if dropped into a city where people speak that language for real -- everybody will talk so much faster than you imagined ...


4

This sounds like it's probably Cantonese or a related dialect. You're going to be best off finding someone who speaks the language to tell you the exact meaning, though whether it is "correct" is often tradition based and may be specific to the region your style comes from or the actual lineage itself. The bit I can tell you: "Shifu Hao" is a basic ...


3

If you want to learn Kung Fu, you probably want listen to the Shaolin Monk. If you want to learn how to defend yourself, you'll need to know how to fight, and you need sparring to do so. Sparring practices staying calm and collected in a intense situation. Plus it's fun. As to whether or not Kung Fu is an effective form of defence, that's another topic. ...


3

I think that the key to finding an answer (as is often the case) lies within formulating properly the question. Learning "kung fu" by itself is difficult to define, since basically kung fu means simply being highly skilled in something (as compared to wushu which is the actual fighting training). But, to get closer to your question, how do you actually ...


3

Some pointers: Train explosive power not just strength. Avoid getting too big. It will slow you down. Never forget to stretch the muscles you trained. During workout you perform contraction after contraction, your muscles are left in a shortened state. Which is bad thing if you train not only for looks but to actualy use it. Stretching helps to reset ...


2

There are current IWUF text books/dvd available from Kungfudirect.com, the material is written in Chinese however it should cover what you are looking for. Peace, Love, Wushu!


2

There are many aspects to this. The most important things during training are: to pay extremely close attention to yourself and others, especially the instructor and senior students to contrast, analyse, reason about and research what you observe, then practice and target experimentation accordingly both for the results that brings and to identify further ...


2

I went with a standard free standing frame. I am on a 3rd floor apartment of an old colonial. The guy below me freaked out. I did a little research and started with a piece of 1/2 4 x 8 Homasote 440 soundboard. I cut it into 3 pieces. 2 of them are 66 in by about 24 inch the covered underneath the framework of the dummy and the front leg. I then went a piece ...


2

I think the previous answers are correct and well thought out. However, I think the answer is really No on all counts a Martial art is just that if you don't use it as intended you don't really know it. You have to use it in a real world way. There are many levels of knowledge really, yes you can learn the mechanics of a technique but to break through to ...


2

Mastery, you want a qualified instructor. But, that's not to say there isn't anything you can learn on your own. Let's consider these factors: Conditioning You can do a lot of conditioning exercises on your own. A lot of the strength, balance and flexibility training can be done solo, and in many cases are not very different than calisthetics outside ...


1

I would say Yes to the 'master' question. As for self training, I would say proceed with caution. There are many videos on youtube that you could learn from, however without a proper master, you might develop bad forms or bad habits that would be very hard to fix later on. I myself encountered this when I self-trained advanced karate forms, only to be ...



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