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13

I'm going to beat the dead horse I keep near my keyboard. I'm skeptical of any school that requires the student to perform any action that the student feels has the potential of being long term harmful. That's not a problem with the school/style, that's a problem with the teacher. As a counterexample, there are two of us who are currently preparing to ...


10

I am myself in the Big Boy / Old Man category, so I feel your pain! Especially since you've been training in quite hard / high-impact styles. For the inflammation: ibuprofen (600mg, after training) ice packs or ice baths (lots of icing after training does wonders) frequent massage with arnica cream, dit da jow, or similar For your next training ...


9

Icing reduces swelling. That is the only reason to ice as far as I know. Swelling can inhibit the motion of joints and make the injury more painful. It may also take a long time to reduce back to normal levels. Icing is effective up to about 48 hours after the injury occurred. Basically, if it keeps swelling, then icing it will continue to help stop that ...


8

Sang Kim in Martial Arts After 40 gives some good advice, the most general point being the suggestion that older martial artists should consider switching from power styles to styles that emphasize precision. He specifically suggests considering weapons arts, to reduce wear and tear that gets harder to recover from as one gets older, as well as their ...


5

Filipino and Indonesian martial arts incorporate a lot of striking and grappling, are quite usable and versatile in the "real world", contain both empty-hand and weapon techniques (which are often the same), and in general, are kind to the joints. The exception being some of the silat groundwork where you're a pretzel, but any reasonable school will take ...


5

A couple of options immediately spring to mind: Aikido the internal Chinese arts of Hsing - I, Ba Gua (Pa Kua) and Tai Chi Aikido is reasonably well known and needs no introduction. The internal arts though are relatively unknown to a lot of people. They are separate arts and they are quite different to your tradition karate/TKD/jiu jutsu, they do have ...


4

This is going to be something of a trial and error method for you, I think. You're going to have to try a bunch of things and go with what works the best or sucks the least. First of all, if your instructor outright bans shoes, that's one thing. If your instructor says no shoes "because" of some reason, then you have a little wriggle room. In that case, see ...


4

Stylistically, I would go with Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, the emphasis on the ground does keep it safer. In fact American Folkstyle Wrestling has rules that encourage more matwork to reduce the risk of injuries during takedowns, which is where most wrestling injuries occur (I can dig up a source on that if you really want, but it'll take me a fair bit of time). ...


4

For me icing is the most effective. On the first two days, I iced bruised area for ten minutes. It keeps my bruised area from going black. And I go jogging once a week. I feel that lots of minor injuries go away after running, since it helps blood flows.


4

The things that help for me, or maybe I only thought they did, were: stretching and warming up thoroughly in the morning going for walks drinking plenty of water eating lots of quality food In other words, the things we should be doing normally.


4

Have you thought about tai chi chuan? I know that westerners tend to think about it more as yoga than martial art but that's a terminology mess to be blamed on popular culture. There are schools that are treating tai chi chuan as a martial art though you might put some effort in finding one. It is an internal art and it will give you freedom to go at your ...


4

Some interesting replies from people on here. Speaking as someone who works in the medical field and has studied martial arts most of my life I felt I had to add my part on this. If your knees cause you problems then doing a martial art that uses a lot of leg work will exascerbate any problems and could make them worse. It might only be gradual but could ...


3

I do gymnastics and I'm the worst on beam. What I do is I ice my bruises overnight, then let them rest and get warm until about 12 then ice it again.


2

About your question i think the best is Wing Chun is a great art, develop by a women and does not uses force, the base is kung fu style of the crane. I train Jeet kune do and i am heavy. And Wing Chun is a great base in martial arts. Wing chun is a martial arts system based on realistic self defence. It is designed for combat and not a sport! Centreline ...


2

I believe I have might be able to help. My chiropodist and I have been working on a martial arts orthotic device for several years now. We have created a barefoot sports (martial arts etc.) arch support based on a ankle sleeve support concept, so it's not a shoe and the orthotic arch support is a medium density EVA foam shaped specifically to offer support ...


2

What Is A Bruise A bruise is a rupturing of the capillaries under the skin which causes blood to pool in the adjacent tissues. Swelling and increased pressure from the bleeding causes the firing of nerve endings in the area, which the brain translates as pain. Treating a Bruise Bruising heals in accordance with the severity of the damage to the tissues, ...


2

Although there are many answers, it doesn't seem like your question has been adequately addressed. You list two requirements: kind to my joints (etc.) practical outside the ring (by this I assume you mean you need to defend yourself) I'm going to advocate a two part strategy. Tai Chi training. Gun training. I don't think there is any doubt that Tai ...


1

Ving tsun, wing chun, are easy one the legs, it's mostly close range hand techniques. Not as much pushing and pulling and jumping as other arts. The idea is to immobilize fast. Simultaneously as you defend you attack with speed. The first form builds strong tendons and joint in the arms. Speed comes with practice. The leg techniques are effective and ...


1

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu my friend! A lot of people who get injuries from Judo go into BJJ as it's a lot softer on the joints as opposed to other martial arts such as Thai Boxing. It is also effective as opposed to pointless martial arts based on forms such as Karate or TKD that don't encourage sparring against a live opponent.


1

Tai chi would typically be an ideal art for older people, but finding someone that really knows the martial aspects of the art today is darn near impossible. Any of the softer more internal martial arts of the gung-fu family would certainly work as there are special techniques in gung-fu known as handicapped fighting which is helpful for those with ...


1

I agree with dandellion, but I can't add a comment under his post (or upvote it) since I haven't built up enough reputation points yet. Berin says he (I'm assuming. please correct me if I'm wrong) that he doesn't want to practice an internal art. I would challenge this statement by saying that it's a more-than-effective martial art in terms of ...


1

I haven't tried this myself, but a few of my friends who compete in Iron Man and the likes are big fans of compression clothing for use after training and competition. Supposedly it prevents the muscles from swelling up with blood, and reduces recovery time. Might be worth a shot - http://www.2xu.com/product/239/Compression-Tight/12/296?set=us


1

Bujinkan Budotaijutsu (popular name in the west is Ninjutsu) lets you adapt the techniques to your own body, so everyone will find a way to execute the moves taught. No high kicks are taught. The only real acrobatics is break-falling, but once mastered, that will keep you from getting injuries. I think jujitsu will be a good suite also, as it shares allot ...


1

Jonathan's answer covers a lot of good forms already, and I second the suggestions of his that I'm familiar with. I'd like to add a couple of my own suggestions. Ninjutsu, Bunjinkan, Ninpo, and similar arts This family of arts has a number of names, but in my experience, they have a good blend of grappling, throwing, and striking, without all the ...


1

All of these sound like "dirty hippy" solutions, but they work well for me! Epsom Salts - Take a warm bath with 0.5 - 1 cup of Epsom Salts added, soak injured section for as long as possible (may work in a cold bath, just never tried it). Arnica Cream - Use like "deep heat", rubbing the cream into the effected area. Cold showers/baths after ...



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