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4

This is going to be something of a trial and error method for you, I think. You're going to have to try a bunch of things and go with what works the best or sucks the least. First of all, if your instructor outright bans shoes, that's one thing. If your instructor says no shoes "because" of some reason, then you have a little wriggle room. In that case, see ...


2

I believe I have might be able to help. My chiropodist and I have been working on a martial arts orthotic device for several years now. We have created a barefoot sports (martial arts etc.) arch support based on a ankle sleeve support concept, so it's not a shoe and the orthotic arch support is a medium density EVA foam shaped specifically to offer support ...


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What Is A Bruise A bruise is a rupturing of the capillaries under the skin which causes blood to pool in the adjacent tissues. Swelling and increased pressure from the bleeding causes the firing of nerve endings in the area, which the brain translates as pain. Treating a Bruise Bruising heals in accordance with the severity of the damage to the tissues, ...


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Although there are many answers, it doesn't seem like your question has been adequately addressed. You list two requirements: kind to my joints (etc.) practical outside the ring (by this I assume you mean you need to defend yourself) I'm going to advocate a two part strategy. Tai Chi training. Gun training. I don't think there is any doubt that Tai ...


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Ving tsun, wing chun, are easy one the legs, it's mostly close range hand techniques. Not as much pushing and pulling and jumping as other arts. The idea is to immobilize fast. Simultaneously as you defend you attack with speed. The first form builds strong tendons and joint in the arms. Speed comes with practice. The leg techniques are effective and ...


1

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu my friend! A lot of people who get injuries from Judo go into BJJ as it's a lot softer on the joints as opposed to other martial arts such as Thai Boxing. It is also effective as opposed to pointless martial arts based on forms such as Karate or TKD that don't encourage sparring against a live opponent.


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Tai chi would typically be an ideal art for older people, but finding someone that really knows the martial aspects of the art today is darn near impossible. Any of the softer more internal martial arts of the gung-fu family would certainly work as there are special techniques in gung-fu known as handicapped fighting which is helpful for those with ...


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I agree with dandellion, but I can't add a comment under his post (or upvote it) since I haven't built up enough reputation points yet. Berin says he (I'm assuming. please correct me if I'm wrong) that he doesn't want to practice an internal art. I would challenge this statement by saying that it's a more-than-effective martial art in terms of ...



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