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37

Go and have a look at all the clubs around where you live. Train once or watch a session. Then pick the one that has the best instructor, the more friendly students, and the one you had the most fun with. Style is second to whoever is teaching you, to whomever you train with, and to however much fun it is. All in equal measures.


25

Kung-Fu fighters pop up from time to time in MMA style fights. Early on in the UFC, there were a small number of kung-fu fighters. But by the end of its first year, you didn't see any. Why? Well there's a reason for that. The first UFC's were open to all. They were very much about putting style vs. style. So they had karate, Taekwondo, kung-fu, wing-chun, ...


19

Mind Maps The BJJ community is big on mind maps, which are close but not an exact match in your search for ontologies. For instance, Aesopian has this one: This is not surprising, since the entire concept that set BJJ apart from judo was the idea of an inexorable flowchart: Takedown Pass guard Mount (using a broad definition of the term--not ...


16

I concur with the previous answers - punching an immoveable surface is bad unless your knuckles and wrists are already conditioned. For example I frequently do single-knuckle strikes on doorway framings - while I do it considerably harder than the normal person I still don't do it with anything near the power I would use on a soft target. I would strongly ...


15

A wrestler will say wrestling, a bjj player will say bjj, a muay thai fighter will say muay thai. But to be fair, they are all right. There isn't really one specific art that is better then the other for a base. I know, some people will argue with me for this, but if you look at the current state of mma, there are champions with a wide assortment of ...


14

Young male, not looking for anything specific, but I am a huge fan of MMA in general. You just answered your own question: try something that has already caught your interest. It's not at all hard to find a school in your area. Look some up and check them out.


13

Wing Chun is uncommon in MMA for three major reasons. First, its practitioners generally shun sparring. Second, its practitioners generally shun realistic wrestling, throwing, and groundwork practice. Third, the skill Wing Chun focuses the most time on--hand trapping--is a small part of fighting in general, and is easily overshadowed by boxing or clinch work ...


12

KUNG FU, MMA, and UFC Roy Nelson, a top tier UFC fighter, commented on his kung fu background: The Lohan school of Shaolin, I actually got started in my Sifu’s garage. I think I was 15 1/2, 16. Kung-fu is the root for I would say 95% of all martial arts. I practice it every day. (With Sticky Hands) basically you’re just working with their body ...


12

I'm not convinced it was martial arts that caused your bad posture. There are other potential causes. Beware the post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. But sure, martial arts can cause bad posture. Kelly Starrett and Joe Rogan discuss this at leeeeength on this podcast, especially circa 46:30. If you hunch to protect yourself from strikes and you spend a lot ...


11

"Wide or deep"? is a classical question in a lot of different domains, and I think the answer depends largely on what your goals are and how you define "expert." You will generally have some set of base techniques–usually but not always from a single style–that you will learn to instinctively fall back on under times of stress, but this doesn't preclude ...


11

This is really simple. Not every impact to the head (whether jaw or nose) knocks someone unconscious. Plenty of soccer players get hit hard by the ball in the face and don't get knocked out. You're more likely to be knocked out if you're weak, if you don't see the impact coming, or if you have a history of being knocked out (that is, people can develop ...


11

As others have said, a knockout is typically not the result of a blow to the nose, but to the chin. The brain is basically a loose spongy thing trapped inside your skull. When you receive a hard blow to the head, the brain will hit the inside of your skull – much like when you shake a nut, and you can hear it rattles against the shell. This will ...


11

Sanshou (similar to sanda) is a major competitive outlet for kung fu styles, allowing kicks, punches, kick catches, and throws. Several fighters with sanshou experience have fought in the UFC, most notably Cung Le. Zhang Tiequan appears to also have some sanshou experience, but today seems to fight primarily as a grappler. There are a small number of kung ...


9

One of the eternal truths about martial arts is that you're going to get hit. And another eternal truth is that sometimes you're going to get hit hard. So it's a good thing to learn to take hits. Being struck in the belly is a good way to learn to tighten the abs and discover that they are an effective shield when they are properly developed and trained. A ...


9

There are no good solutions. Long hair gets in the way of training unless knotted or braided, and even then it is liable to wiggle free and get in the way during hard training. All external tools--nets, headbands, bandanas, caps--are liable to come off. Well-executed braids and buns are slightly more reliable, but frequently come out anyway. You must ...


8

My master told its not good for bones. and he is right. Practicing "non-sport" karate (bushido dzen) I am following a simple rule: hit soft with hard (like a punch to stomach or strike to throat) and hard with soft (palm-strike to the head can cause lots of damage if done right). Of course, if/when you wear gloves, everything will be different.


8

I do BJJ/grappling and stand up jujitsu, and I've discovered the following works best for long hair: Pull your hair into a tight, low ponytail on the side of your head, not straight back, else when you grapple it will get trapped under your head on the ground. Quickly braid the hair and secure with a second band! It's nowhere near the work of the full ...


8

Defending punches by putting a glove against your face is not a successful strategy without big gloves. With MMA's small gloves or without gloves at all, it is a Bad Idea. To be truthful, it's not an optimal strategy in boxing or kickboxing, either: you still take a substantial impact. Instead, work your rolling, bobbing and weaving, slipping, and parrying, ...


7

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


7

There are all kinds of places on the body where fighters can get hit (the nose, the jaw, the solar plexus, the thigh, the liver, the kidneys, etc.), and each one of those triggers not just pain but subconscious, automatic physical reactions and altered psychological states. The pain is really the least of anyone's problems in this situation. It's the other ...


7

One thing to realize is that you have two factors that affect blocking a strike: 1) reaction time, and 2) tracking. Reaction time is the time taken by your brain to notice the strike coming towards you, to calculate an appropriate response, and to begin to move to counter it. (Notice I said "begin" to move, not the complete movement.) If a strike has a ...


6

The question asks which is more effective: Doing MMA or doing multiple different martial arts. There are a couple of different interpretations about what is meant by "effective" in this context, however. First, it can refer to how well all the different styles of martial arts are integrated into a cohesive system whereby all the techniques work together and ...


5

Your options as a college club are: Share what each member knows Find a coach or teacher Be a thoroughly mediocre "fight club" I recommend avoiding (3). Learning from online resources is hard and not recommended. Either accept that the styles you'll learn are the styles that each of your (possibly flaky, deranged, drama-bringing) fellow students brings ...


5

It's not good for your body. It's also not good in general for your mental development. Walls and people don't move the same way. People yield* when they get hit. Walls do not. Attach heavy pillows to the wall with velcro or glue or nails or something. Then punch those instead. It's a start, until you find something better to punch. YIELDING - the ...


5

As an MMA fighter myself, who has had to cut as much as 13 kgs in as little as 8 weeks, I will say this: It is very possible to cut a lot of weight in short periods of time. However, it can be difficult and a test on you mentally and physically. I was talking to a guy that claimed to have lost 20 kg in 6 weeks on a diet plan that he was give for this ...


5

You say you are young. If you are still in middle or high school you should join the wrestling team. This will be free daily training, and you will have bi weekly competitions if not more often. So Once you can fight MMA legally (18 usually) you will have already had 100 or so competitions, which is a huge advantage when it comes to the adrenaline dump of ...


5

I believe the story you are referring to in Zen In The Martial Arts is the chapter, "Confident Seeing" on page 109. The instructor was Sam Brodsky and he was doing a demonstration for his students in which he intended to break 9 one inch slabs of concrete with one punch of his fist. While only breaking 7 slabs he had pulverized many of the small bones in ...


5

BJ Penn and Demian Maia The training results of BJ Penn and Demian Maia cannot be replicated at will. Some people just have natural gifts. Luck also plays a factor, as does physicality, especially as relates to avoiding injury. Without discounting the tremendous amount of hard work that he put into training, BJ Penn was bestowed with natural physical ...


5

I tried this solution out and it works. Tie you hair in a pony tail put a bandana or buff over your head with the hair inside so that it is not hanging out. Put a mma/wrestling ear guard over your head covering the front part of the buff/bandana, and the rear part holding it firmly on your head This holds the hair under the cloth so that it doesn't rub ...



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