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33

Go and have a look at all the clubs around where you live. Train once or watch a session. Then pick the one that has the best instructor, the more friendly students, and the one you had the most fun with. Style is second to whoever is teaching you, to whomever you train with, and to however much fun it is. All in equal measures.


18

Mind Maps The BJJ community is big on mind maps, which are close but not an exact match in your search for ontologies. For instance, Aesopian has this one: This is not surprising, since the entire concept that set BJJ apart from judo was the idea of an inexorable flowchart: Takedown Pass guard Mount (using a broad definition of the term--not ...


15

A wrestler will say wrestling, a bjj player will say bjj, a muay thai fighter will say muay thai. But to be fair, they are all right. There isn't really one specific art that is better then the other for a base. I know, some people will argue with me for this, but if you look at the current state of mma, there are champions with a wide assortment of ...


13

Young male, not looking for anything specific, but I am a huge fan of MMA in general. You just answered your own question: try something that has already caught your interest. It's not at all hard to find a school in your area. Look some up and check them out.


10

"Wide or deep"? is a classical question in a lot of different domains, and I think the answer depends largely on what your goals are and how you define "expert." You will generally have some set of base techniques–usually but not always from a single style–that you will learn to instinctively fall back on under times of stress, but this doesn't preclude ...


8

One of the eternal truths about martial arts is that you're going to get hit. And another eternal truth is that sometimes you're going to get hit hard. So it's a good thing to learn to take hits. Being struck in the belly is a good way to learn to tighten the abs and discover that they are an effective shield when they are properly developed and trained. A ...


7

I concur with the previous answers - punching an immoveable surface is bad unless your knuckles and wrists are already conditioned. For example I frequently do single-knuckle strikes on doorway framings - while I do it considerably harder than the normal person I still don't do it with anything near the power I would use on a soft target. I would strongly ...


7

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


5

Your options as a college club are: Share what each member knows Find a coach or teacher Be a thoroughly mediocre "fight club" I recommend avoiding (3). Learning from online resources is hard and not recommended. Either accept that the styles you'll learn are the styles that each of your (possibly flaky, deranged, drama-bringing) fellow students brings ...


5

As an MMA fighter myself, who has had to cut as much as 13 kgs in as little as 8 weeks, I will say this: It is very possible to cut a lot of weight in short periods of time. However, it can be difficult and a test on you mentally and physically. I was talking to a guy that claimed to have lost 20 kg in 6 weeks on a diet plan that he was give for this ...


5

You say you are young. If you are still in middle or high school you should join the wrestling team. This will be free daily training, and you will have bi weekly competitions if not more often. So Once you can fight MMA legally (18 usually) you will have already had 100 or so competitions, which is a huge advantage when it comes to the adrenaline dump of ...


5

Yes, no, maybe... It all depends on what you mean by "appropriate". First, the themes and matters discussed in the book are suitable for an adult. If you were a teenager or child, things might be different but at 19 you should have the matturity to read whatever you chose. Second, should you follow the advice given (if any) in the books is up to you. I ...


5

When you train MMA you train each specific art that the gym offers: Brazilian jiujitsu (or, rarely, other forms of grappling), wrestling, some form of striking (usually muay Thai or MMA striking). You generally still train each constituent art separately at least some of the time. The concern is that training several arts at once will slow your advancement ...


4

Personally, I've had classes in both traditional and more modern forms, and I have to recommend Muay Thai. At least in my experience it fits your requirements: Base - Muay Thai is more or less where most modern MMA fighters start. And in that sense it's a bit more practical than (for instance) kung fu. Ease to get into - Again this fits the bill. Get ...


4

It's not good for your body. It's also not good in general for your mental development. Walls and people don't move the same way. People yield* when they get hit. Walls do not. Attach heavy pillows to the wall with velcro or glue or nails or something. Then punch those instead. It's a start, until you find something better to punch. YIELDING - the ...


4

I don't know of an existing ontology, but we can create one. Everyone should feel free to edit this to make it more complete. I have organized it with the headings (big and small) as well as lists as end nodes. I expect it will become cumbersome very quickly. Feel free to rearrange. (Perhaps the lists would be better off paragraphed instead of bulleted, for ...


4

NullPointer, it's a parable and it's either (a) impossible or (b) just a case of the guy healing & the doctors being wrong. Just a parable; there is no single guy this is based on. I believe the lesson is a little less than what you state; that a positive attitude can help you overcome obstacles including healing, but not necessarily to do the ...


4

I believe the story you are referring to in Zen In The Martial Arts is the chapter, "Confident Seeing" on page 109. The instructor was Sam Brodsky and he was doing a demonstration for his students in which he intended to break 9 one inch slabs of concrete with one punch of his fist. While only breaking 7 slabs he had pulverized many of the small bones in ...


4

It seems to me that you're right about the fact that both the kicker and the checker should recieve the same amount of force. There are, however, other factors to take into consideration. When I practiced Gung Fu, we ofter perfomed exercises with the intent of strenghening our bones and building up protective cartilage. I would assume this is done in other ...


4

There has been some discussion about the variables at play in this particular leg break, and leg breaks from checked leg kicks in general. It seems that turning the hip over during the kick helps prevent injuring oneself. There is also a difference between a leg kick being checked against the receivers shin or against their knee. The latter is stronger. ...


4

I used to play water polo in high school, and some of the lifeguarding maneuvers (such as taking the person under the water with you) can lessen these things. The other thing that worked well for me (especially once I established a reputation for it) is if they are willing to choke you, then they should be willing to suffer the consequences. I would grab ...


3

My master told its not good for bones. and he is right. Practicing "non-sport" karate (bushido dzen) I am following a simple rule: hit soft with hard (like a punch to stomach or strike to throat) and hard with soft (palm-strike to the head can cause lots of damage if done right). Of course, if/when you wear gloves, everything will be different.


3

You are probably correct about jiu-jitsu if you ever want to compete. Forrest Griffin makes a distinction between being a fighter and a martial artist in Got Fight. He seems to emphasize jiu-jitsu and grappling for success in being a professional MMA fighter. I've learned some karate, judo, boxing, hwa-rang-do, and most recently Aikido. I am most interested ...


3

It is not good to practice on walls especially if you are just starting out, this could hurt your wrist. Knuckle push ups are not bad since there is no kinetic energy transfer between you and the floor. There are pads that you can purchase which can be attached to the wall, and provide some level of cushioning for your punches outside of the cloth or bandage ...


3

Yes, it is possible to become an expert in different martial arts. The first thing to realize is that all martial arts are, are different ways of moving your body. Some martial arts have overlap in their methodologies - and where that happens, it's easy to learn these arts and become good at them without too much extra effort - the baseline skills and ...


3

There are plenty of guides to cutting weight out their on the internet. The best advice i can give you is to not try to cut to much. Personally, when i was fighting MMA, i didn't really cut weight. I would diet a little bit, but never got into the whole cut 15lbs of water weigth and hope to get properly hydrated in 24h. It's not good for your ...


3

Assuming you have no fat to lose, then you haven't really got anything to lose. (maybe get non essential organs removed :-) ) If you are on the edge, then water weight is what you have to lose. Alternatively, avoid muscle. Given a lot of strength is about how many muscle fibers you can employ at the same time, not size of muscle cells ( you can't ...


3

There's a story by Joe Hyams in his book Zen in the Martial Arts that is probably what you're thinking of, or comes from the same root. The tile breaking sounds different, but the "men working" visualization and miraculous recovery is identical.


3

'Free Fighting' is an old term meaning MMA basically. Before the UFC had come to dominate all that was mixed martial arts, people called it by all kinds of names. Shootfighting, Mixfighting, Free fighting, etc. I would expect MMA techniques, and other self-defense techniques. e.g. you will likely (hopefully) get a mixture of boxing, wrestling, submissions ...


3

The one thing I would add to Dave's answer is that a MMA gym will tend to focus on practical a lot - and they will tend to emphasize the bigger stronger faster mantra. This is great if you are big or strong to begin with, but not so good if you don't fit those categories - in fact for a newbie it can be downright dangerous (you'll get hurt a few times), and ...



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