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7

There are all kinds of places on the body where fighters can get hit (the nose, the jaw, the solar plexus, the thigh, the liver, the kidneys, etc.), and each one of those triggers not just pain but subconscious, automatic physical reactions and altered psychological states. The pain is really the least of anyone's problems in this situation. It's the other ...


5

I was in your situation - I was a programmer (now a dev manager) and I put on 20 lbs in 2 years sitting around eating badly. However, I did have the advantage of a life of sports (including nearly 30 years in martial arts now) and a college degree in kinesiology to help me turn that around. You are already doing TKD twice a week, and jogging in the morning. ...


4

In general terms these are the ways I've dealt with different kinds of pain: Soreness: Warm Baths Massaging the sore area Stretching gently after an easy warmup After small injuries from punches or sprains Apply cold (in form of an ice pack) the day of injury, subsequent days apply warm (you can use a zip-lock bag with warm wather inside, covered by a ...


3

You get used to it after a while. That's all there is to it. If you get hit enough times, you stop being afraid of it. The fear of getting hit is much worse than getting hit itself. Also, when the adrenalin is flowing you don't really feel pain. I finished (and won) a fight with a broken collarbone which I thought was just a slight sprain. It hurt like a ...


2

There are three major ways in which martial artists learn to deal with pain. Toughing through it This is one of the more commonly cited methods. Basically, by being hurt repeatedly, you start to condition your body to continue on beyond the pain. You hurt, but swelling and stiffness is reduced and toy set aside the psychological reactions. Meditative ...


2

Training for TaeKwonDo involves largely the same strength exercises every athlete should be doing: weighted lunges, squats, and deadlifts for the lower body and core strength. For the upper body, some form of appropriately-loaded upper body pushing and pulling is needed, whether that takes the form of push-ups, overhead press, planks, pull-ups, or rows. ...


2

At home I do a 20-10 workout, get a partner to hold pads (or wear gloves) on their hips (height can be adjusted as you get used to it - i go a little higher than that to ensure above belt height), kick (45 kicks) as many times as you can in 20 seconds take 10 seconds rest and kick again. If your sparring bouts last 90 seconds then 3-4 bouts of kicking is ...


2

I preferred cycling to running, but that's not important. What's important is that you do interval training (search on Google for examples). You'll want to do lots of muscle conditioning too. Use lighter weights, and go for more reps and sets. You want to build lean, toned, fast-twitch muscle. I can't give you a specific workout because I don't know you, ...



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