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12

I'm not convinced it was martial arts that caused your bad posture. There are other potential causes. Beware the post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. But sure, martial arts can cause bad posture. Kelly Starrett and Joe Rogan discuss this at leeeeength on this podcast, especially circa 46:30. If you hunch to protect yourself from strikes and you spend a lot ...


7

There are all kinds of places on the body where fighters can get hit (the nose, the jaw, the solar plexus, the thigh, the liver, the kidneys, etc.), and each one of those triggers not just pain but subconscious, automatic physical reactions and altered psychological states. The pain is really the least of anyone's problems in this situation. It's the other ...


5

When you train MMA you train each specific art that the gym offers: Brazilian jiujitsu (or, rarely, other forms of grappling), wrestling, some form of striking (usually muay Thai or MMA striking). You generally still train each constituent art separately at least some of the time. The concern is that training several arts at once will slow your advancement ...


5

I was in your situation - I was a programmer (now a dev manager) and I put on 20 lbs in 2 years sitting around eating badly. However, I did have the advantage of a life of sports (including nearly 30 years in martial arts now) and a college degree in kinesiology to help me turn that around. You are already doing TKD twice a week, and jogging in the morning. ...


4

In general terms these are the ways I've dealt with different kinds of pain: Soreness: Warm Baths Massaging the sore area Stretching gently after an easy warmup After small injuries from punches or sprains Apply cold (in form of an ice pack) the day of injury, subsequent days apply warm (you can use a zip-lock bag with warm wather inside, covered by a ...


4

My Sensei once told me that aikido looks different that it feels. In other words you see a choreographed routine, I see someone practicing a potentially nasty joint lock that would make it difficult and painful for resisting opponent to continue. Now aikido is not without weakness, but to assume it an obsolete because it doesn't do as well as you would ...


3

MMA training will give you a solid set of conditioning, live drills/sparring, both with striking and grappling. There's a wealth of video and book references you can draw upon and you'll likely have lots of people to train with. Singular martial arts really depends on the art and the school. Any of the above that applies to an MMA school may, or may not ...


3

The one thing I would add to Dave's answer is that a MMA gym will tend to focus on practical a lot - and they will tend to emphasize the bigger stronger faster mantra. This is great if you are big or strong to begin with, but not so good if you don't fit those categories - in fact for a newbie it can be downright dangerous (you'll get hurt a few times), and ...


3

May I also recommend doing Taichi along with whatever other martial art you decide to learn. You may have to search for a teacher who knows the martial arts side of Taichi, but generally when you do they are overjoyed to find a student interested in that aspect. Learning Taichi along with your martial art will work to fix up posture mis-alignments, free up ...


3

Yes, it is possible to become an expert in different martial arts. The first thing to realize is that all martial arts are, are different ways of moving your body. Some martial arts have overlap in their methodologies - and where that happens, it's easy to learn these arts and become good at them without too much extra effort - the baseline skills and ...


3

The style matters less than who is teaching it. The same style can be taught very differently by different people. I would look for location first: your dojo/gym/training place should be within easy travel distance of where you are. I would say less than an hour's drive (both ways) but that might vary depending on how much you generally travel. Secondly, ...


3

What Dave said. Just pitching in to say i had the same problem. After years of boxing/thai boxing i developed a bit of a "monkey slouch" as well. Boxing classes usually contain a lot of push-ups and crunches and the stance is a little hunched. What helped me was a) actively trying not to slouch, b) diversifying my training and c) adding more exercises for ...


3

You get used to it after a while. That's all there is to it. If you get hit enough times, you stop being afraid of it. The fear of getting hit is much worse than getting hit itself. Also, when the adrenalin is flowing you don't really feel pain. I finished (and won) a fight with a broken collarbone which I thought was just a slight sprain. It hurt like a ...


2

There are three major ways in which martial artists learn to deal with pain. Toughing through it This is one of the more commonly cited methods. Basically, by being hurt repeatedly, you start to condition your body to continue on beyond the pain. You hurt, but swelling and stiffness is reduced and toy set aside the psychological reactions. Meditative ...


2

Training for TaeKwonDo involves largely the same strength exercises every athlete should be doing: weighted lunges, squats, and deadlifts for the lower body and core strength. For the upper body, some form of appropriately-loaded upper body pushing and pulling is needed, whether that takes the form of push-ups, overhead press, planks, pull-ups, or rows. ...


2

At home I do a 20-10 workout, get a partner to hold pads (or wear gloves) on their hips (height can be adjusted as you get used to it - i go a little higher than that to ensure above belt height), kick (45 kicks) as many times as you can in 20 seconds take 10 seconds rest and kick again. If your sparring bouts last 90 seconds then 3-4 bouts of kicking is ...


2

I preferred cycling to running, but that's not important. What's important is that you do interval training (search on Google for examples). You'll want to do lots of muscle conditioning too. Use lighter weights, and go for more reps and sets. You want to build lean, toned, fast-twitch muscle. I can't give you a specific workout because I don't know you, ...


2

From your background, BJJ could be the easiest choice: you've already practiced it, it does benefit from breakdancing (read the story of the Martinez brothers at 10th Planet Vista), you were good at it. It does require flexibility though, but you can always work on it. That said, I think the main point is not what is the easiest choice, but rather the most ...


2

For what it's worth I was in pretty much the same place as you - in my 40s and in need of some kind of activity to stay fit while being nice to my knees. Boxing did the trick for me. It is relatively easy to learn in the sense that it is conecptually simple (you are only having to deal with striking) but is incredibly challenging to master... especially the ...


2

No, well-taught martial arts don't. Injury can. The following suggestion is made sight unseen, and does not constitute medical advice or diagnosis. I say it because you describe a postural change I have observed many times in the past, with a common cause; other/different causes are certainly possible. The posture you describe corresponds to a postural ...


1

I believe your question can be answered by considering the following variables: Your level of skill The number and skill of your opponents The circumstances in which the fight takes place Of course, if you pit two martial artists with the same amount of experience against each other, the one with most practical experience will most probably win. Notice ...


1

We don't have a huge amount to go on here: Easier on the [stiff] joints: suggests you might want to avoid an art with a lot of vigorous joint locking, such as ju jitsu or hapkido; on the other hand something that does twist the joints but less aggressively might actually help you in feeling less stiff - e.g. aikido, taichi. spatial intelligence / ...


1

The other answers are all good, but there is one thing missing from the equation here; what is the goal with your training? Do you want to become more fit? Do you want to compete? Do you want to learn how to handle yourself in a dangerous situation? I want to become more fit If it's only the physical training you want it doesn't really matter if you're ...


1

Sounds like you have lots of wants and wishes. But the best thing is to simplify, don't try and do everything, sounds to me you want to focus on :- striking, clinching, takedowns, ground fight (no gi, with strikes). So if you lay this out to all the people with different skills, you can all contribute how you want to do each part, look at what each ...


1

MCMAP is a good martial arts program and the online resources (the guide book which can be download from the US military site is really quite good with really detailed body movements). I would suggest to start practicing the core curriculum for each belt level the double prescribed amount of hours. As above I would suggest free sparring with rules and ...



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