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5

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


4

Your options as a college club are: Share what each member knows Find a coach or teacher Be a thoroughly mediocre "fight club" I recommend avoiding (3). Learning from online resources is hard and not recommended. Either accept that the styles you'll learn are the styles that each of your (possibly flaky, deranged, drama-bringing) fellow students brings ...


4

You say you are young. If you are still in middle or high school you should join the wrestling team. This will be free daily training, and you will have bi weekly competitions if not more often. So Once you can fight MMA legally (18 usually) you will have already had 100 or so competitions, which is a huge advantage when it comes to the adrenaline dump of ...


4

There has been some discussion about the variables at play in this particular leg break, and leg breaks from checked leg kicks in general. It seems that turning the hip over during the kick helps prevent injuring oneself. There is also a difference between a leg kick being checked against the receivers shin or against their knee. The latter is stronger. ...


4

It seems to me that you're right about the fact that both the kicker and the checker should recieve the same amount of force. There are, however, other factors to take into consideration. When I practiced Gung Fu, we ofter perfomed exercises with the intent of strenghening our bones and building up protective cartilage. I would assume this is done in other ...


4

NullPointer, it's a parable and it's either (a) impossible or (b) just a case of the guy healing & the doctors being wrong. Just a parable; there is no single guy this is based on. I believe the lesson is a little less than what you state; that a positive attitude can help you overcome obstacles including healing, but not necessarily to do the ...


3

I believe the story you are referring to in Zen In The Martial Arts is the chapter, "Confident Seeing" on page 109. The instructor was Sam Brodsky and he was doing a demonstration for his students in which he intended to break 9 one inch slabs of concrete with one punch of his fist. While only breaking 7 slabs he had pulverized many of the small bones in ...


2

I think that the reason that the checker receives less pain than the kicker is because of what part of the shin the checker uses to block the kick. The checker uses the upper part of the shin, close to the knee. The kicker uses the lower part of the shin, close to the foot. Due to the great thickness (or density, I'm not sure) of the upper shin, I think ...


2

Regarding the BJJ Ontology. I started putting one together a few months back. You can check it out through the WebProtoge project named BJJ - Brazilian Jiu Jitsu at http://webprotege.stanford.edu/ It's very similar to what Dave Liepmann has put together in his mindmap. The BJJ Ontology I started is described in the OWL (Web Ontology Language). I pulled ...


2

Do any of you hold a teaching belt in any of the martial arts you do? It also sounds like it will be more of a 'mixing all of our martial arts together' than an MMA program as is understood with cage fighting? The real thing you need is an instructor of some sort. You cannot just find highly effective street techniques; most of what you know, and what you ...


2

Most of what has been said so far is correct and in your question you asked about reducing the impact. This is also a big factor. If your leg can move when hit, the impact is greatly reduced. If your foot is planted then you absorb the full force. This also places a large side load on your knee. Our legs are designed to take hits from the front, that is why ...


1

At my gym, we have multiple specialist take coaches in specific areas that they excel at such as striking, kicking, wrestling , ground submission and etc etc. We usually focus on specific each day. We have 2 scheduled free fights, one halfway through the training and one at the end. During this, our free fight couch will usually be an experience / veteran ...


1

'Free Fighting' is an old term meaning MMA basically. Before the UFC had come to dominate all that was mixed martial arts, people called it by all kinds of names. Shootfighting, Mixfighting, Free fighting, etc. I would expect MMA techniques, and other self-defense techniques. e.g. you will likely (hopefully) get a mixture of boxing, wrestling, submissions ...


1

As far as I can tell, there is no generally accepted definition of what "free fighting" means. It's definitely not a style in and of itself. In some cases, the "free" in "free fighting" can refer to the part of the fight where you and your opponent are free to move around each other and are not holding onto one another at all. So you're free. That would ...


1

Just as you have mentioned in your question I have noticed when I check a kick that the point of impact and the actual stoping point of the kick are far enough apart to allow a bit of dissipation of power from the kick You are also stoping the kick before full power can be reached. It is like the monk who throws his stomach into the punch then allows ...


1

Learn submission grappling from an instructor, not from the internet. You say you've been training for 7 weeks. If you are training at a school, just keep going, you will learn more and more chokes. Maybe with the time you have free to practice at home, you can go to the gym extra and practice there? Text and video is not enough when it comes to grappling; ...



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