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12

I'm not convinced it was martial arts that caused your bad posture. There are other potential causes. Beware the post hoc, ergo propter hoc fallacy. But sure, martial arts can cause bad posture. Kelly Starrett and Joe Rogan discuss this at leeeeength on this podcast, especially circa 46:30. If you hunch to protect yourself from strikes and you spend a lot ...


7

There are all kinds of places on the body where fighters can get hit (the nose, the jaw, the solar plexus, the thigh, the liver, the kidneys, etc.), and each one of those triggers not just pain but subconscious, automatic physical reactions and altered psychological states. The pain is really the least of anyone's problems in this situation. It's the other ...


5

I was in your situation - I was a programmer (now a dev manager) and I put on 20 lbs in 2 years sitting around eating badly. However, I did have the advantage of a life of sports (including nearly 30 years in martial arts now) and a college degree in kinesiology to help me turn that around. You are already doing TKD twice a week, and jogging in the morning. ...


5

Your shin can break if you kick someone very hard and they block just right and all conditions align against you. You can break your hand punching someone, even aiming to soft targets like the ribs. You can blow out your knee throwing someone with ouchigari. You can get concussed into unconsciousness taking someone down with a double-leg if they time their ...


5

My Sensei once told me that aikido looks different that it feels. In other words you see a choreographed routine, I see someone practicing a potentially nasty joint lock that would make it difficult and painful for resisting opponent to continue. Now aikido is not without weakness, but to assume it an obsolete because it doesn't do as well as you would ...


4

Krav Maga is not a martial art. It is a self defense system that has acquired or adapted techniques from different martial arts to fulfill a specific purpose. Those include groundfighting, stand-up fighting and weapon techniques — one can argue form which art actually ex. BJJ, Muay Thai whatever — but always striving to have the most effective one for the ...


4

In general terms these are the ways I've dealt with different kinds of pain: Soreness: Warm Baths Massaging the sore area Stretching gently after an easy warmup After small injuries from punches or sprains Apply cold (in form of an ice pack) the day of injury, subsequent days apply warm (you can use a zip-lock bag with warm wather inside, covered by a ...


3

I preferred cycling to running, but that's not important. What's important is that you do interval training (search on Google for examples). You'll want to do lots of muscle conditioning too. Use lighter weights, and go for more reps and sets. You want to build lean, toned, fast-twitch muscle. I can't give you a specific workout because I don't know you, ...


3

What Dave said. Just pitching in to say i had the same problem. After years of boxing/thai boxing i developed a bit of a "monkey slouch" as well. Boxing classes usually contain a lot of push-ups and crunches and the stance is a little hunched. What helped me was a) actively trying not to slouch, b) diversifying my training and c) adding more exercises for ...


3

You get used to it after a while. That's all there is to it. If you get hit enough times, you stop being afraid of it. The fear of getting hit is much worse than getting hit itself. Also, when the adrenalin is flowing you don't really feel pain. I finished (and won) a fight with a broken collarbone which I thought was just a slight sprain. It hurt like a ...


3

Im in the same situation. For the past 6 months I've been hitting the gym for 5-6 days a week. My schedule looks like this: Mo: chest/shoulders Tu: arms/back We: legs/cardio Tu: same as Mo Fr: same as Tu Sa: same as We Every Tuesday and Friday evening I go to Wing Chun, a lesson is 2 hours, the first 25 minutes are hardcore cardio. My goals are working on ...


3

Well.. They do shin conditioning prior to sparring. A weak shin will always tend to break if it's blocked with the knee or a stronger shin. So you should be careful when using your shin to kick. That's why most of the Muay Thai fighters tend to hit lower kicks aiming for outer thighs of the opponents which reduces the risk of damaging / breaking their shins. ...


3

Conditioning is one part of kicking safely with a shin to make it stronger gradually by damage/repair periods. However conditioning also teaches how to kick with your shin on an acute angle that will not hurt or break the shin. Also, the lower part of the shin should be used, close to the instep. This part is not as likely to break and some strapping or shin ...


2

Training for TaeKwonDo involves largely the same strength exercises every athlete should be doing: weighted lunges, squats, and deadlifts for the lower body and core strength. For the upper body, some form of appropriately-loaded upper body pushing and pulling is needed, whether that takes the form of push-ups, overhead press, planks, pull-ups, or rows. ...


2

At home I do a 20-10 workout, get a partner to hold pads (or wear gloves) on their hips (height can be adjusted as you get used to it - i go a little higher than that to ensure above belt height), kick (45 kicks) as many times as you can in 20 seconds take 10 seconds rest and kick again. If your sparring bouts last 90 seconds then 3-4 bouts of kicking is ...


2

There are three major ways in which martial artists learn to deal with pain. Toughing through it This is one of the more commonly cited methods. Basically, by being hurt repeatedly, you start to condition your body to continue on beyond the pain. You hurt, but swelling and stiffness is reduced and toy set aside the psychological reactions. Meditative ...


2

No, well-taught martial arts don't. Injury can. The following suggestion is made sight unseen, and does not constitute medical advice or diagnosis. I say it because you describe a postural change I have observed many times in the past, with a common cause; other/different causes are certainly possible. The posture you describe corresponds to a postural ...


1

I believe your question can be answered by considering the following variables: Your level of skill The number and skill of your opponents The circumstances in which the fight takes place Of course, if you pit two martial artists with the same amount of experience against each other, the one with most practical experience will most probably win. Notice ...



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