Hot answers tagged

12

KUNG FU, MMA, and UFC Roy Nelson, a top tier UFC fighter, commented on his kung fu background: The Lohan school of Shaolin, I actually got started in my Sifu’s garage. I think I was 15 1/2, 16. Kung-fu is the root for I would say 95% of all martial arts. I practice it every day. (With Sticky Hands) basically you’re just working with their body ...


11

Wing Chun is uncommon in MMA for three major reasons. First, its practitioners generally shun sparring. Second, its practitioners generally shun realistic wrestling, throwing, and groundwork practice. Third, the skill Wing Chun focuses the most time on--hand trapping--is a small part of fighting in general, and is easily overshadowed by boxing or clinch work ...


7

There are all kinds of places on the body where fighters can get hit (the nose, the jaw, the solar plexus, the thigh, the liver, the kidneys, etc.), and each one of those triggers not just pain but subconscious, automatic physical reactions and altered psychological states. The pain is really the least of anyone's problems in this situation. It's the other ...


5

To be honest I'm not really sure how you differentiate what you described from what you term as a "standard back kick". There can be a few ways to execute this kick, most of them are just variations on how to start it. You are quite correct that it is a very effective (and devastating) kick if executed correctly. But the reason why you never see the back ...


5

Your shin can break if you kick someone very hard and they block just right and all conditions align against you. You can break your hand punching someone, even aiming to soft targets like the ribs. You can blow out your knee throwing someone with ouchigari. You can get concussed into unconsciousness taking someone down with a double-leg if they time their ...


5

I was in your situation - I was a programmer (now a dev manager) and I put on 20 lbs in 2 years sitting around eating badly. However, I did have the advantage of a life of sports (including nearly 30 years in martial arts now) and a college degree in kinesiology to help me turn that around. You are already doing TKD twice a week, and jogging in the morning. ...


4

In general terms these are the ways I've dealt with different kinds of pain: Soreness: Warm Baths Massaging the sore area Stretching gently after an easy warmup After small injuries from punches or sprains Apply cold (in form of an ice pack) the day of injury, subsequent days apply warm (you can use a zip-lock bag with warm wather inside, covered by a ...


4

Krav Maga is not a martial art. It is a self defense system that has acquired or adapted techniques from different martial arts to fulfill a specific purpose. Those include groundfighting, stand-up fighting and weapon techniques — one can argue form which art actually ex. BJJ, Muay Thai whatever — but always striving to have the most effective one for the ...


4

One thing to realize is that you have two factors that affect blocking a strike: 1) reaction time, and 2) tracking. Reaction time is the time taken by your brain to notice the strike coming towards you, to calculate an appropriate response, and to begin to move to counter it. (Notice I said "begin" to move, not the complete movement.) If a strike has a ...


4

From a Historic European Martial Arts (HEMA) perspective, you have some options open to you: Punch you opponent. Drop your lower hand and use that hand for punching, while maintaining pressure on the sticks with your other hand. Grab your opponent's weapon with your lower hand, then go to town using the short end of your stick, the point of your stick, or ...


3

Sticks don't "get stuck". There's no cross guard to catch the main body of the weapon. If you ended up in a position of stick vs. stick without momentum, it would break into a different position very quickly: You can grab their stick for a disarm, lock, or to open them for an attack (and you'd probably want to do so before they do the same to you) You ...


3

Conditioning is one part of kicking safely with a shin to make it stronger gradually by damage/repair periods. However conditioning also teaches how to kick with your shin on an acute angle that will not hurt or break the shin. Also, the lower part of the shin should be used, close to the instep. This part is not as likely to break and some strapping or shin ...


3

Well.. They do shin conditioning prior to sparring. A weak shin will always tend to break if it's blocked with the knee or a stronger shin. So you should be careful when using your shin to kick. That's why most of the Muay Thai fighters tend to hit lower kicks aiming for outer thighs of the opponents which reduces the risk of damaging / breaking their shins. ...


3

Im in the same situation. For the past 6 months I've been hitting the gym for 5-6 days a week. My schedule looks like this: Mo: chest/shoulders Tu: arms/back We: legs/cardio Tu: same as Mo Fr: same as Tu Sa: same as We Every Tuesday and Friday evening I go to Wing Chun, a lesson is 2 hours, the first 25 minutes are hardcore cardio. My goals are working on ...


3

For UFC at least, any point-based analysis is going to run into the problem of a very fuzzy scoring system, similar to that in boxing: The following objective scoring criteria shall be utilized by the judges when scoring a round: a round is to be scored as a 10-10 round when both contestants appear to be fighting evenly and neither contestant ...


3

I preferred cycling to running, but that's not important. What's important is that you do interval training (search on Google for examples). You'll want to do lots of muscle conditioning too. Use lighter weights, and go for more reps and sets. You want to build lean, toned, fast-twitch muscle. I can't give you a specific workout because I don't know you, ...


3

You get used to it after a while. That's all there is to it. If you get hit enough times, you stop being afraid of it. The fear of getting hit is much worse than getting hit itself. Also, when the adrenalin is flowing you don't really feel pain. I finished (and won) a fight with a broken collarbone which I thought was just a slight sprain. It hurt like a ...


3

Auto-massage is trending as a main way to reduce soreness generated by hard muscle training. You can do it with your own hands and fingers or by the aid of a foam roller or a tennis ball. I'll recommend you to check this videos. How to Get Rid of Muscle Soreness, Aches + Pains 3 Unique Boxing Drills Using a Tennis Ball Enough sleeping (min 7:30 h) and ...


2

Training for TaeKwonDo involves largely the same strength exercises every athlete should be doing: weighted lunges, squats, and deadlifts for the lower body and core strength. For the upper body, some form of appropriately-loaded upper body pushing and pulling is needed, whether that takes the form of push-ups, overhead press, planks, pull-ups, or rows. ...


2

At home I do a 20-10 workout, get a partner to hold pads (or wear gloves) on their hips (height can be adjusted as you get used to it - i go a little higher than that to ensure above belt height), kick (45 kicks) as many times as you can in 20 seconds take 10 seconds rest and kick again. If your sparring bouts last 90 seconds then 3-4 bouts of kicking is ...


2

There are three major ways in which martial artists learn to deal with pain. Toughing through it This is one of the more commonly cited methods. Basically, by being hurt repeatedly, you start to condition your body to continue on beyond the pain. You hurt, but swelling and stiffness is reduced and toy set aside the psychological reactions. Meditative ...


2

I have very long hair and I'm a wrestler so I usually wear my hair in a French braid in a pony tail. The braid works better at keeping hair out of your face.


1

The ability to defend successfully is governed by the following time relationship: reaction_time + decision_time + defend_time(defend_distance) < telegraph_time + attack_time(attack_distance) Covering greater distances requires more time. Here are some defensive principles: Control distance - If you simply want to defend yourself, keep others ...


1

Sometimes your opponent is faster than you. Sometimes they can read your body language and your tells, and fake you out, or feint. Sometimes you might have patterns that leave you open in predictable ways, and they take advantage of that. Sometimes you think you are dodging to safety and you're walking right into the attack. "More training" could help, ...


1

I really don't know how to explain this. The movies are there for entertainment. Everything you see there is entertainment and has little to no relationship to reality. Please don't think that you can look at anything you see in any movie and assume it in any way represents anything which has or does or would happen in reality. Scholagladiatoria on this ...


1

Hang a sheet of paper from the ceiling (wedge the string that it hangs on into a light fitting). Practice hitting the paper flat on, with a snap and speed (after warmups and stretching). This will improve your speed, balance and accuracy without the need for equipment. After you've done that well enough (500+ punches) do some strengthening stuff (pushups ...


1

I answered a question that was similar to this before, which you might want to read: Close quarter's defense: when you stand face to face with an attacker That answer deals with an aggressor who attempts to stand face to face with you, violating your personal space but not actually throwing the first punch. A situation like that is best seen through ...


1

I get sore muscles all the time. Remember to get enough rest between training. I usually rest for an entire day, making sure I get enough sleep before my next workout. I have heard before about eating egg whites and drinking whey protein shakes help with muscle repair, but I have yet to try it. What really helps is a good massage on the sore area before ...



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