Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


5

When you train MMA you train each specific art that the gym offers: Brazilian jiujitsu (or, rarely, other forms of grappling), wrestling, some form of striking (usually muay Thai or MMA striking). You generally still train each constituent art separately at least some of the time. The concern is that training several arts at once will slow your advancement ...


5

Yes, no, maybe... It all depends on what you mean by "appropriate". First, the themes and matters discussed in the book are suitable for an adult. If you were a teenager or child, things might be different but at 19 you should have the matturity to read whatever you chose. Second, should you follow the advice given (if any) in the books is up to you. I ...


4

There has been some discussion about the variables at play in this particular leg break, and leg breaks from checked leg kicks in general. It seems that turning the hip over during the kick helps prevent injuring oneself. There is also a difference between a leg kick being checked against the receivers shin or against their knee. The latter is stronger. ...


4

It seems to me that you're right about the fact that both the kicker and the checker should recieve the same amount of force. There are, however, other factors to take into consideration. When I practiced Gung Fu, we ofter perfomed exercises with the intent of strenghening our bones and building up protective cartilage. I would assume this is done in other ...


4

I used to play water polo in high school, and some of the lifeguarding maneuvers (such as taking the person under the water with you) can lessen these things. The other thing that worked well for me (especially once I established a reputation for it) is if they are willing to choke you, then they should be willing to suffer the consequences. I would grab ...


4

I believe the story you are referring to in Zen In The Martial Arts is the chapter, "Confident Seeing" on page 109. The instructor was Sam Brodsky and he was doing a demonstration for his students in which he intended to break 9 one inch slabs of concrete with one punch of his fist. While only breaking 7 slabs he had pulverized many of the small bones in ...


3

The style matters less than who is teaching it. The same style can be taught very differently by different people. I would look for location first: your dojo/gym/training place should be within easy travel distance of where you are. I would say less than an hour's drive (both ways) but that might vary depending on how much you generally travel. Secondly, ...


3

Yes, it is possible to become an expert in different martial arts. The first thing to realize is that all martial arts are, are different ways of moving your body. Some martial arts have overlap in their methodologies - and where that happens, it's easy to learn these arts and become good at them without too much extra effort - the baseline skills and ...


3

MMA training will give you a solid set of conditioning, live drills/sparring, both with striking and grappling. There's a wealth of video and book references you can draw upon and you'll likely have lots of people to train with. Singular martial arts really depends on the art and the school. Any of the above that applies to an MMA school may, or may not ...


3

The one thing I would add to Dave's answer is that a MMA gym will tend to focus on practical a lot - and they will tend to emphasize the bigger stronger faster mantra. This is great if you are big or strong to begin with, but not so good if you don't fit those categories - in fact for a newbie it can be downright dangerous (you'll get hurt a few times), and ...


3

'Free Fighting' is an old term meaning MMA basically. Before the UFC had come to dominate all that was mixed martial arts, people called it by all kinds of names. Shootfighting, Mixfighting, Free fighting, etc. I would expect MMA techniques, and other self-defense techniques. e.g. you will likely (hopefully) get a mixture of boxing, wrestling, submissions ...


2

At my gym, we have multiple specialist take coaches in specific areas that they excel at such as striking, kicking, wrestling , ground submission and etc etc. We usually focus on specific each day. We have 2 scheduled free fights, one halfway through the training and one at the end. During this, our free fight couch will usually be an experience / veteran ...


2

Most of what has been said so far is correct and in your question you asked about reducing the impact. This is also a big factor. If your leg can move when hit, the impact is greatly reduced. If your foot is planted then you absorb the full force. This also places a large side load on your knee. Our legs are designed to take hits from the front, that is why ...


2

Honestly, it is a choice between getting kicked in the flesh where I get hurt but the guy who kicked me didn't and checking so we both suffer pain. Once I check, he might be less inclined to throw another hard kick, because it hurts him just as much.


2

I think that the reason that the checker receives less pain than the kicker is because of what part of the shin the checker uses to block the kick. The checker uses the upper part of the shin, close to the knee. The kicker uses the lower part of the shin, close to the foot. Due to the great thickness (or density, I'm not sure) of the upper shin, I think ...


2

May I also recommend doing Taichi along with whatever other martial art you decide to learn. You may have to search for a teacher who knows the martial arts side of Taichi, but generally when you do they are overjoyed to find a student interested in that aspect. Learning Taichi along with your martial art will work to fix up posture mis-alignments, free up ...


2

For what it's worth I was in pretty much the same place as you - in my 40s and in need of some kind of activity to stay fit while being nice to my knees. Boxing did the trick for me. It is relatively easy to learn in the sense that it is conecptually simple (you are only having to deal with striking) but is incredibly challenging to master... especially the ...


2

From your background, BJJ could be the easiest choice: you've already practiced it, it does benefit from breakdancing (read the story of the Martinez brothers at 10th Planet Vista), you were good at it. It does require flexibility though, but you can always work on it. That said, I think the main point is not what is the easiest choice, but rather the most ...


1

We don't have a huge amount to go on here: Easier on the [stiff] joints: suggests you might want to avoid an art with a lot of vigorous joint locking, such as ju jitsu or hapkido; on the other hand something that does twist the joints but less aggressively might actually help you in feeling less stiff - e.g. aikido, taichi. spatial intelligence / ...


1

The other answers are all good, but there is one thing missing from the equation here; what is the goal with your training? Do you want to become more fit? Do you want to compete? Do you want to learn how to handle yourself in a dangerous situation? I want to become more fit If it's only the physical training you want it doesn't really matter if you're ...


1

Just as you have mentioned in your question I have noticed when I check a kick that the point of impact and the actual stoping point of the kick are far enough apart to allow a bit of dissipation of power from the kick You are also stoping the kick before full power can be reached. It is like the monk who throws his stomach into the punch then allows ...


1

As far as I can tell, there is no generally accepted definition of what "free fighting" means. It's definitely not a style in and of itself. In some cases, the "free" in "free fighting" can refer to the part of the fight where you and your opponent are free to move around each other and are not holding onto one another at all. So you're free. That would ...


1

Sounds like you have lots of wants and wishes. But the best thing is to simplify, don't try and do everything, sounds to me you want to focus on :- striking, clinching, takedowns, ground fight (no gi, with strikes). So if you lay this out to all the people with different skills, you can all contribute how you want to do each part, look at what each ...


1

MCMAP is a good martial arts program and the online resources (the guide book which can be download from the US military site is really quite good with really detailed body movements). I would suggest to start practicing the core curriculum for each belt level the double prescribed amount of hours. As above I would suggest free sparring with rules and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible