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The ability to defend successfully is governed by the following time relationship: reaction_time + decision_time + defend_time(defend_distance) < telegraph_time + attack_time(attack_distance) Covering greater distances requires more time. Here are some defensive principles: Control distance - If you simply want to defend yourself, keep others ...


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One thing to realize is that you have two factors that affect blocking a strike: 1) reaction time, and 2) tracking. Reaction time is the time taken by your brain to notice the strike coming towards you, to calculate an appropriate response, and to begin to move to counter it. (Notice I said "begin" to move, not the complete movement.) If a strike has a ...


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Why can you not dodge every attack? For the following reasons: If you dodge every attack (without supplying your own), you're no longer fighting, but running. That generally goes against the martial aspect of martial arts. Your opponent can keep giving out attacks faster than you dodge them. Your dodge could end up moving you into the way of the next ...


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Sometimes your opponent is faster than you. Sometimes they can read your body language and your tells, and fake you out, or feint. Sometimes you might have patterns that leave you open in predictable ways, and they take advantage of that. Sometimes you think you are dodging to safety and you're walking right into the attack. "More training" could help, ...



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