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28

NO!!!!! Get out. Get out now. As in, do not train there even one more time. There is always the chance of being injured in any martial art. That's true of any active sport, of course--but "combat sports" have an intention of everyone getting hit, kicked, etc. The requirement for safety is therefore paramount. You need to train safely if you are going to be ...


13

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


13

Kickboxing is a generic term for fighting sports/systems that use kicking and boxing techniques, though the rules of some but not all kickboxing groups do allow additional techniques such as elbows and knees. Muay Thai is a sports form distilled from the traditional Thai martial arts (Muay boran). Muay thai uses kicking, punching, elbows and knees, ...


10

plowing through the drills as my partner moves in tandem There's a good version of this and a poisonous version of this. The good version is that your padholder is calling for combinations on the fly and you are responding mindlessly. That's super. That's mushin-no-shin. The bad version is that you are a rock-'em-sock-'em robot. If both of you are ...


9

The main difference between Muay Thai and kickboxing is that Muay Thai allows additional techniques, e.g. elbow strikes, knee strikes and clinches. A kickboxing referee will usually break up a clinch, but in Muay Thai, he will not. Kickboxing has a minimum and maximum number of kicks you must land during a round (I think it's 8 and 15 respectively but I'm ...


9

You're answering your own question here. In sparring they can't go light and hit with momentum and throw dangerous moves. I have seen another guy get an elbow to on the back of his neck and haven't seen him in weeks I got a very strong hook that gave me a huge black eye (after asking for them to go lighter). Last week during a seminar in ...


8

It's supposed to be hard All serious training is supposed to remain difficult and challenging. If, as you say, you have improved your ability to get through warm-ups and training in general, then you're improving. You will keep improving the more you train. Key word: sporadically Regular training gets you more fit more quickly than irregular training. The ...


7

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


7

If you go once a week, you'll make very slow progress. If you go twice a week, your progress will be mediocre. If you go three times or more a week, you'll make steady progress. Training five or more times a week is a whole separate level of learning. (If for some reason you're able to train many times a week, make sure you ease into it. Don't over do it in ...


7

Obviously the instructor I worked with last night knows what he's talking about because, as I said, he is an accomplished fighter. This doesn't make him an accomplished teacher at all. During your travels you will encounter different instructors with differing quality. You need to recognise when they are either not the best instructor for you, or when ...


7

Magic is not real, so I am afraid that ying/yang energy is out. It is most likely that endorphins are being released after exercise. They can also be released during meditation.


7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


7

Fighting disciplines (such as Muay Thai, boxing etc.) Can cause multiple eye traumas. If your vision becomes blurry or if the pain doesn't go away you might want to consider consulting a physician. You can learn more on potential eye injury from blow to the head by reading these articles: Giovinazzo VJ, Yannuzzi LA, Sorenson JA, Delrowe DJ, Cambell EA. ...


7

Drills are meant to teach your muscles to perform a technique properly. I would pad the hell out of the recipient before I let another student hit him/her full-force. It's not about inflicting damage, it's about learning how to do something properly and with force. That's how I do it anyway. There's no sense in punching the hell out of each other each time. ...


7

Defending punches by putting a glove against your face is not a successful strategy without big gloves. With MMA's small gloves or without gloves at all, it is a Bad Idea. To be truthful, it's not an optimal strategy in boxing or kickboxing, either: you still take a substantial impact. Instead, work your rolling, bobbing and weaving, slipping, and parrying, ...


7

No. The only asset is if you have to training less BJJ to training Muay Thai. If you will train MT and will have the same hours of training of BJJ this is not a issue. As a martial art you need spend time training. The longer you practice the luckiest you are. Rickson Gracie


6

It's not possible to learn a martial art at home with no partners. Even if you had partners and the necessary equipment, you don't have a knowledgeable instructor to point out your errors. You need someone experienced in the art to notice and show you when you're doing things wrong, to schedule your training, to push you, to arrange sparring matches and ...


6

You're going to get a lot of push-back and they'll probably close this question, but you're not far off. Hard-sparring arts have proven themselves in ways that non-competitive arts have not. However, don't forget that other arts spar hard as well: san da/san shou is akin to kickboxing with fast throws and takedowns. However, like how all modern mixed artial ...


6

If your opponent throws a knee while not in clinch a good way to stop it is to extend your arm (jab) to their chest. If you lean slightly into it your arm should reach longer than their knee. You may as well hit the chin instead of the chest. If you are locked in the clinch you can try to throw your opponent off balance as soon as they lift their leg to ...


6

The fist should move as little as possible. The power of the uppercut comes from slightly dipping in the knees while turning the hip and then pushing from the hip. The elbow shouldn't move behind the body at all. The movement should look a little like the elbow is fixed at the hip and being pushed by the hip rotation/thrust. Only at the very end the arm ...


6

The question asks which is more effective: Doing MMA or doing multiple different martial arts. There are a couple of different interpretations about what is meant by "effective" in this context, however. First, it can refer to how well all the different styles of martial arts are integrated into a cohesive system whereby all the techniques work together and ...


6

Since Muay Thai is a sport that doesn't allow takedowns or grappling it doesn't contain countermeasures for theses kind of attacks. Neither does for example boxing. If a muay thai fighter tries a take down (repeatedly) they will be disqualified. That said Muay Boran and Krabi Krabong are martial arts that do seem to contain certain aspects of fighting on ...


6

Short answer: don't spar until your doctor says it's okay. Accidents happen.


5

Expanded version of my comment on Dave's answer Those who can't get in the forth and fifth formal sessions a week can get some of the benefit by doing some solo work. Forms, bag work, footwork drill, and so on. There are whole books on the subject.1 You don't get the more learning, but you do forget less between sessions. I also use these solo sessions as ...


5

As a beginner, you can make really rapid progress 2x/week (lots of material to learn, and you have no place to go but up). But as you get to an intermediate level, 2x will seem like treading water -- it'll keep you in shape and keep your skills sharp, but you won't improve rapidly -- but you'll need 3x or more if you want to keep advancing at a good clip.


5

Time it better through endless repetitions. Be lighter on your feet. Also, you could instead step in and deliver a straight right to the face. I prefer that to checking. Train it more. You're aware of it now, you'll improve now.


5

You should get out. While it's true that any training there is a spectrum of how hard you may want to go - from the no-contact doing only forms kind of training up to folks like the Dog Brothers using full force stick fighting... the fact is that there's a point after which you are taking injuries and gaining nothing. And if the school is going harder than ...


5

Anderson Silva, an MMA fighter with a muay Thai background, has executed low-kick catches in the UFC against Chael Sonnen (to an inside leg kick, no less) and James Irvin, as described in this Judo Chop article. The James Irvin kick catch was simply spectacular, and seems like it would apply well to strict MT competition as well. (Note that the Irvin kick ...


5

It all depends on what you want to achieve. Want to become a boxing champion? Go do boxing. Want to be TKD pro? Go practice TKD. If you just want to be able to fight off some bullies practice (almost) any martial art, most of them are good and bullies/hooligans normally do not have a rich background of martial arts. Also, it heavily depends on the ...


5

If I fought Muay Thai I'd want to work slowly and carefully towards a double bodyweight deadlift using sets of 1 to 5, staying on the higher end of that range whenever possible. A set of 5 is picking up the weight five times without taking more than a couple seconds between repetitions. Personally I usually program deadlifts as a bunch of warm-up sets, ...



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