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Defending punches by putting a glove against your face is not a successful strategy without big gloves. With MMA's small gloves or without gloves at all, it is a Bad Idea. To be truthful, it's not an optimal strategy in boxing or kickboxing, either: you still take a substantial impact. Instead, work your rolling, bobbing and weaving, slipping, and parrying, ...


5

Anderson Silva, an MMA fighter with a muay Thai background, has executed low-kick catches in the UFC against Chael Sonnen (to an inside leg kick, no less) and James Irvin, as described in this Judo Chop article. The James Irvin kick catch was simply spectacular, and seems like it would apply well to strict MT competition as well. (Note that the Irvin kick ...


4

The question asks which is more effective: Doing MMA or doing multiple different martial arts. There are a couple of different interpretations about what is meant by "effective" in this context, however. First, it can refer to how well all the different styles of martial arts are integrated into a cohesive system whereby all the techniques work together and ...


4

It all depends on what you want to achieve. Want to become a boxing champion? Go do boxing. Want to be TKD pro? Go practice TKD. If you just want to be able to fight off some bullies practice (almost) any martial art, most of them are good and bullies/hooligans normally do not have a rich background of martial arts. Also, it heavily depends on the ...


3

Several sports aside boxing and martial arts (such as soccer, rugby, ice hockey) have the potential to cause damage. So, the risks are real and clear (for example: Kickboxing sport as a new cause of traumatic brain injury-mediated hypopituitarism), as they are for any sports that allows contact. That said, how severe the risk is? This is a difficult ...


2

As you guessed, small gloves aren't ideal for passive blocking (keeping your hands in one position to block more than one punch). The closest thing to passive blocking you could get away with in MMA is to whip your forearm at your opponent's wrist in such a manner that your wrist impacts his. This isn't a strike though, the idea is the get your wrist to ...


2

If the kick is slow enough or sloppy enough to be caught, then yes you should catch it. Why not - it's there for the taking. In a non-tournament situation (i.e. real life) catching a kick should mean fight over. When shouldn't you catch a kick? When you run the risk of breaking your arm by getting it in the way, or you become vulnerable to further ...



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