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4

Attempting such a kick is one thing, but given how easily the opponent can pull push or twist you with the leg they're holding, and all the ways in which your attempted kick might miss or make more or less contact than hoped, it's very presumptuous to assume anything about how you'll land afterwards let alone "fall with the hands to the floor and bring your ...


4

The legality of the move has already been answered by Juann and others in the comments. Even if it was legal, this would be a poor option. If a Muay Thai opponent grabs your leg (catches your kick), the next thing they are going to do is smash the thigh of your supporting leg. They are not going to give you a moment to start launching your own convoluted ...


3

The style matters less than who is teaching it. The same style can be taught very differently by different people. I would look for location first: your dojo/gym/training place should be within easy travel distance of where you are. I would say less than an hour's drive (both ways) but that might vary depending on how much you generally travel. Secondly, ...


2

May I also recommend doing Taichi along with whatever other martial art you decide to learn. You may have to search for a teacher who knows the martial arts side of Taichi, but generally when you do they are overjoyed to find a student interested in that aspect. Learning Taichi along with your martial art will work to fix up posture mis-alignments, free up ...


2

For what it's worth I was in pretty much the same place as you - in my 40s and in need of some kind of activity to stay fit while being nice to my knees. Boxing did the trick for me. It is relatively easy to learn in the sense that it is conecptually simple (you are only having to deal with striking) but is incredibly challenging to master... especially the ...


2

nothing but your feet may ever touch the mat. With that in mind, there is no kick you can perform that will have enough leverage to do any damage or even cause slight discomfort to your opponent. The only reasonable course of action here would be to punch him in the face until he lets go.


2

From your background, BJJ could be the easiest choice: you've already practiced it, it does benefit from breakdancing (read the story of the Martinez brothers at 10th Planet Vista), you were good at it. It does require flexibility though, but you can always work on it. That said, I think the main point is not what is the easiest choice, but rather the most ...


1

We don't have a huge amount to go on here: Easier on the [stiff] joints: suggests you might want to avoid an art with a lot of vigorous joint locking, such as ju jitsu or hapkido; on the other hand something that does twist the joints but less aggressively might actually help you in feeling less stiff - e.g. aikido, taichi. spatial intelligence / ...


1

In traditional american kickboxing it was only allowed to punch and kick abowe the waist. Almost the same as karate but with boxing gloves. But in muay thai it is allowed with lowkicks to the legs, knees and elbows, plus clinching and grabbing the opponents kicking leg. Muay thai is somewhat slower and puts a lot more power in each strike than in ...


1

Here is a Video about holding Thai Pads: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53FIPt6z9CQ Maybe you can find something useful there.



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