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8

But, when training, you can stop and breathe. But there's no time to breathe in a real fight. This difference does not have to exist. A coach should occasionally put students through sparring of some kind that the student should not take breaks in. That can take many forms, including hard rounds with someone else from the gym, or a smoker match-up with ...


8

I see no trouble training pure striking on a hard floor. It's also not clear that the floor was the cause of your injury--you say it is from hitting pads. If throws, clinch, or takedowns are even a possibility--as they generally should be--then mats make more sense, but that doesn't seem to be the issue here.


5

Your shin can break if you kick someone very hard and they block just right and all conditions align against you. You can break your hand punching someone, even aiming to soft targets like the ribs. You can blow out your knee throwing someone with ouchigari. You can get concussed into unconsciousness taking someone down with a double-leg if they time their ...


3

Conditioning is one part of kicking safely with a shin to make it stronger gradually by damage/repair periods. However conditioning also teaches how to kick with your shin on an acute angle that will not hurt or break the shin. Also, the lower part of the shin should be used, close to the instep. This part is not as likely to break and some strapping or shin ...


3

I would not recommend staying in any school, regardless of style, that insists on doing something that results in students being injured; this is a sure sign of a McDojo. That said, what is the hard floor? Is it a nice polished wooden sprung floor? Is it bare weathered concrete in the parking lot? There is a huge difference between those and anything in ...


3

Round Kick You're delivering the kick with the lower part your fibula. You would also block a low round kick by turning your fibula to meet the fibula of the opponent. The tibia, while potentially stronger than the fibula, is located on the posterior in relation to the Fibula. It would therefore be in no position to deliver a low round kick. Hook Kick ...


3

So, are there any viable (healthy) ways to simulate the body reactions to a punch landed to the face, intending to practice defense in such semiconscious state? I had heard a story that at least some Cuban amateur boxers will do somersaults as part of their pad workouts. The idea is that this will help you improve punch accuracy/precision when you are a ...


3

Well.. They do shin conditioning prior to sparring. A weak shin will always tend to break if it's blocked with the knee or a stronger shin. So you should be careful when using your shin to kick. That's why most of the Muay Thai fighters tend to hit lower kicks aiming for outer thighs of the opponents which reduces the risk of damaging / breaking their shins.


2

I imagine you're looking for the right teacher and motivation, and not so much the right martial art. I suggest going to a few local various MA gyms and checking out the physical intensity of their workout, and choosing the one with most sweat and partner-work involved. This will match with the boxing ethic and any martial art, which requires intensive ...


1

The best art is the one you do not quit soon. This means, go and look at all the usual arts (probably filtered down to those you can actually train close to you, it's no use if you find a fancy art that is taught 100s of km away). If none of the martial art schools close to you trigger your interest, then I don't see an answer. And you can only decide that ...


1

Just start with boxing and go from there. If you an agile guy and/or just want to use your legs, try kickboxing as well. Muay-Thai involves a few more techniques + elbows; the rest just being kickboxing basically. (in my opinio) Don't go with any traditional martial arts because it will involve form and specific things/exercises that will sometimes take ...


1

Boxing is good for body shape, easy/quick to learn, and it is ok for self defense. You can practice your by yourself easily. Kick Boxing and/or Muay Thai are good for shape too, a little bit harder (slower) than boxing but they are easy/quick yet, better than boxing for self defense. You can still use your punching bag to practice. Other Martial arts are ...


1

I supose that you are talking about the low-kick aka kick to the thigh. I would like to make a difference between a kick with the front leg (1.) and a kick with the back leg (2.) (keep in mind that you are standing in fighting stance where one leg is in front and one back). My proposal would be the following: A kick with the front leg is faster because ...


1

The thing is to time your kick to make contact when your opponent's balance is on the leg that you are kicking. That way your kick will do more damage as they can't absorb much force with no give on the leg. If their balance is on the opposite leg, your kick can be checked. This is why small rapid steps during mobility gives you the time and balance to ...


1

Would you recommend training on mats or is training on the hard ground really a thing ? I would really recommend training on mats, no matter the art you do. I used to train on tiled floors, so we were very careful performing stunts like takedowns and jumping/flying kicks. In Taekwon-do the pattern Choong Moo has a move to jump and spin 360 degrees in ...


1

We've moved our hap ki do dojang from a place with mats to a place with super flooring as the floor and as yet there have been no feet injuries. We put mats in place when we're throwing and doing take downs. I agree that an instructor who pushes you through injury is a danger.



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