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16

NO!!!!! Get out. Get out now. As in, do not train there even one more time. There is always the chance of being injured in any martial art. That's true of any active sport, of course--but "combat sports" have an intention of everyone getting hit, kicked, etc. The requirement for safety is therefore paramount. You need to train safely if you are going to be ...


9

Kickboxing is a generic term for fighting sports/systems that use kicking and boxing techniques, though the rules of some but not all kickboxing groups do allow additional techniques such as elbows and knees. Muay Thai is a sports form distilled from the traditional Thai martial arts (Muay boran). Muay thai uses kicking, punching, elbows and knees, ...


8

It's supposed to be hard All serious training is supposed to remain difficult and challenging. If, as you say, you have improved your ability to get through warm-ups and training in general, then you're improving. You will keep improving the more you train. Key word: sporadically Regular training gets you more fit more quickly than irregular training. The ...


7

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


7

The main difference between Muay Thai and kickboxing is that Muay Thai allows additional techniques, e.g. elbow strikes, knee strikes and clinches. A kickboxing referee will usually break up a clinch, but in Muay Thai, he will not. Kickboxing has a minimum and maximum number of kicks you must land during a round (I think it's 8 and 15 respectively but I'm ...


7

You're answering your own question here. In sparring they can't go light and hit with momentum and throw dangerous moves. I have seen another guy get an elbow to on the back of his neck and haven't seen him in weeks I got a very strong hook that gave me a huge black eye (after asking for them to go lighter). Last week during a seminar in ...


6

Magic is not real, so I am afraid that ying/yang energy is out. It is most likely that endorphins are being released after exercise. They can also be released during meditation.


6

Fighting disciplines (such as Muay Thai, boxing etc.) Can cause multiple eye traumas. If your vision becomes blurry or if the pain doesn't go away you might want to consider consulting a physician. You can learn more on potential eye injury from blow to the head by reading these articles: Giovinazzo VJ, Yannuzzi LA, Sorenson JA, Delrowe DJ, Cambell EA. ...


6

The fist should move as little as possible. The power of the uppercut comes from slightly dipping in the knees while turning the hip and then pushing from the hip. The elbow shouldn't move behind the body at all. The movement should look a little like the elbow is fixed at the hip and being pushed by the hip rotation/thrust. Only at the very end the arm ...


5

Time it better through endless repetitions. Be lighter on your feet. Also, you could instead step in and deliver a straight right to the face. I prefer that to checking. Train it more. You're aware of it now, you'll improve now.


5

plowing through the drills as my partner moves in tandem There's a good version of this and a poisonous version of this. The good version is that your padholder is calling for combinations on the fly and you are responding mindlessly. That's super. That's mushin-no-shin. The bad version is that you are a rock-'em-sock-'em robot. If both of you are ...


5

If your opponent throws a knee while not in clinch a good way to stop it is to extend your arm (jab) to their chest. If you lean slightly into it your arm should reach longer than their knee. You may as well hit the chin instead of the chest. If you are locked in the clinch you can try to throw your opponent off balance as soon as they lift their leg to ...


5

Drills are meant to teach your muscles to perform a technique properly. I would pad the hell out of the recipient before I let another student hit him/her full-force. It's not about inflicting damage, it's about learning how to do something properly and with force. That's how I do it anyway. There's no sense in punching the hell out of each other each time. ...


4

Based on the information provided, it sounds like you might benefit from placing more weight on the back leg. When I practice blocking with my lead leg, I find that it works much quicker if the weight distribution is more towards the back leg. It's hard to say without actually watching what you're doing, but it might be helpful to also bend the back leg ...


4

There has been some discussion about the variables at play in this particular leg break, and leg breaks from checked leg kicks in general. It seems that turning the hip over during the kick helps prevent injuring oneself. There is also a difference between a leg kick being checked against the receivers shin or against their knee. The latter is stronger. ...


4

It seems to me that you're right about the fact that both the kicker and the checker should recieve the same amount of force. There are, however, other factors to take into consideration. When I practiced Gung Fu, we ofter perfomed exercises with the intent of strenghening our bones and building up protective cartilage. I would assume this is done in other ...


4

This will depend in large part on what you hope to achieve. Both Krav Maga and Muay Thai have a particular focus. "Which is best" type questions do not work on Stack Exchange. "Which is best for this thing I'm trying to achieve" do work. I won't discuss the relative merits of Krav Maga vs Muay Thai, since each has a particular focus that it is best at. ...


4

Here's the thing about shoulder pain: it might be a muscle strain, it might be partial tendon tear, it might be a pinched nerve, it might be bursitis, it might be a lot of things. Now, depending what the problem is, massage might help, rest might help, strengthening might help, stretching might help, ergonomics might help... hell, surgery might help. On ...


4

The legality of the move has already been answered by Juann and others in the comments. Even if it was legal, this would be a poor option. If a Muay Thai opponent grabs your leg (catches your kick), the next thing they are going to do is smash the thigh of your supporting leg. They are not going to give you a moment to start launching your own convoluted ...


4

Attempting such a kick is one thing, but given how easily the opponent can pull push or twist you with the leg they're holding, and all the ways in which your attempted kick might miss or make more or less contact than hoped, it's very presumptuous to assume anything about how you'll land afterwards let alone "fall with the hands to the floor and bring your ...


4

You should get out. While it's true that any training there is a spectrum of how hard you may want to go - from the no-contact doing only forms kind of training up to folks like the Dog Brothers using full force stick fighting... the fact is that there's a point after which you are taking injuries and gaining nothing. And if the school is going harder than ...


4

Anderson Silva, an MMA fighter with a muay Thai background, has executed low-kick catches in the UFC against Chael Sonnen (to an inside leg kick, no less) and James Irvin, as described in this Judo Chop article. The James Irvin kick catch was simply spectacular, and seems like it would apply well to strict MT competition as well. (Note that the Irvin kick ...


3

depends on how hard you spar and how well you protect your dome. You shouldn't get a broken nose in sparring unless you're not wearing headgear and/or getting ready for a fight. Otherwise you should have headgear on and not going full force anyway. But different gyms, different flavors.


3

Yes, you have a high risk of getting your nose broken at some stage if you continue with Muay Thai. It isn't Tiddly Winks* - you will eventually get an injury, not just from landed punches but also from kicks. If you are at all attached to your nose (pun intended) the reconsider Muay Thai. Personally I've had my nose broken half a dozen times or more - the ...


3

When you punch to the body don't keep standing up; you need to change your level. Dip through your legs, like a small squat and duck down, like you would if you duck a punch. You don't just bend at the waist and lean over, you squat down. From there you can punch your regular punch. (i.e. a straight/hook) Your ideas for when to throw the bodyshots are ...


3

As Jack Slack notes in his discussion of body punching in MMA, one of the most successful methods for setting up a punch to the body is forcing the opponent to shell up first: 0:04 Max Holloway uses a double left hook (or a lever punch) to keep his opponent's hands high before sneaking a palm down right hook in to the body (George Foreman style) and a ...


3

It is ideal—in any martial science which delivers blows as heavy as those in Muay Thai—to have some support around the joints most frequently used. This is one reason why the ankle is wrapped—akin to having a knee brace. This provides support and reinforcement The second reason is for protection. That added layer of cloth, or whatever is used to wrap the ...


3

I am not overly familiar with the rules, but I found the elbow to be very effective against knees. The elbow should make impact with the muscle of the upper leg, as connecting with the knee will be too dangerous for the defender. Elbows are also great for "discouraging" kicks to the ribs and it has the added benefit of keeping your hands in a position to ...


3

First, you need to keep your own posture strong. Then you need to force them to stand up straight, usually by placing your own forearm across their face. They can't throw knees if they are standing up straight. Second, you can force an arm between theirs, and then use it to lever yourself out of the clinch. Or you can stand them up straight, grab the side ...



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