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8

I see no trouble training pure striking on a hard floor. It's also not clear that the floor was the cause of your injury--you say it is from hitting pads. If throws, clinch, or takedowns are even a possibility--as they generally should be--then mats make more sense, but that doesn't seem to be the issue here.


7

But, when training, you can stop and breathe. But there's no time to breathe in a real fight. This difference does not have to exist. A coach should occasionally put students through sparring of some kind that the student should not take breaks in. That can take many forms, including hard rounds with someone else from the gym, or a smoker match-up with ...


7

No. The only asset is if you have to training less BJJ to training Muay Thai. If you will train MT and will have the same hours of training of BJJ this is not a issue. As a martial art you need spend time training. The longer you practice the luckiest you are. Rickson Gracie


7

Short answer: don't spar until your doctor says it's okay. Accidents happen.


6

Since Muay Thai is a sport that doesn't allow takedowns or grappling it doesn't contain countermeasures for theses kind of attacks. Neither does for example boxing. If a muay thai fighter tries a take down (repeatedly) they will be disqualified. That said Muay Boran and Krabi Krabong are martial arts that do seem to contain certain aspects of fighting on ...


5

Your shin can break if you kick someone very hard and they block just right and all conditions align against you. You can break your hand punching someone, even aiming to soft targets like the ribs. You can blow out your knee throwing someone with ouchigari. You can get concussed into unconsciousness taking someone down with a double-leg if they time their ...


5

If I fought Muay Thai I'd want to work slowly and carefully towards a double bodyweight deadlift using sets of 1 to 5, staying on the higher end of that range whenever possible. A set of 5 is picking up the weight five times without taking more than a couple seconds between repetitions. Personally I usually program deadlifts as a bunch of warm-up sets, ...


4

Some pointers: Train explosive power not just strength. Avoid getting too big. It will slow you down. Never forget to stretch the muscles you trained. During workout you perform contraction after contraction, your muscles are left in a shortened state. Which is bad thing if you train not only for looks but to actualy use it. Stretching helps to reset ...


4

Dr. Cary M. Silverman, MD recommends here a set of "rec specs" the hard-framed sports glasses that you say on, e.g., basketball players. On the same page, Emil Chynn, MD recommends LASEK surgery instead, which apparently has a lower chance of flap dislocation.


3

So, are there any viable (healthy) ways to simulate the body reactions to a punch landed to the face, intending to practice defense in such semiconscious state? I had heard a story that at least some Cuban amateur boxers will do somersaults as part of their pad workouts. The idea is that this will help you improve punch accuracy/precision when you are a ...


3

Well.. They do shin conditioning prior to sparring. A weak shin will always tend to break if it's blocked with the knee or a stronger shin. So you should be careful when using your shin to kick. That's why most of the Muay Thai fighters tend to hit lower kicks aiming for outer thighs of the opponents which reduces the risk of damaging / breaking their shins. ...


3

Conditioning is one part of kicking safely with a shin to make it stronger gradually by damage/repair periods. However conditioning also teaches how to kick with your shin on an acute angle that will not hurt or break the shin. Also, the lower part of the shin should be used, close to the instep. This part is not as likely to break and some strapping or shin ...


3

I would not recommend staying in any school, regardless of style, that insists on doing something that results in students being injured; this is a sure sign of a McDojo. That said, what is the hard floor? Is it a nice polished wooden sprung floor? Is it bare weathered concrete in the parking lot? There is a huge difference between those and anything in ...


3

Auto-massage is trending as a main way to reduce soreness generated by hard muscle training. You can do it with your own hands and fingers or by the aid of a foam roller or a tennis ball. I'll recommend you to check this videos. How to Get Rid of Muscle Soreness, Aches + Pains 3 Unique Boxing Drills Using a Tennis Ball Enough sleeping (min 7:30 h) and ...


3

Assuming that you cannot train yourself out of the Ridiculous Gag Reflex [patent pending]1, you could get a dentist to make your a custom made mouth guard. It might well be expensive but probably cheaper than having your teeth replaced. You may as well consider using sparing helmets as they might help. 1. I have no idea how you would even go about doing ...


2

If you've just started out there's no sense in worrying about the finer details. You need to get your muscles used to working out first. That means high reps with light weights. I would suggest starting out with a beginner's strength course.


2

From experience in both, there is of course the addition of knees and elbows in Thai over Kickboxing. Regarding technique, since both of these disciplines train you for ring fighting (rather than say self defense), Kickboxing uses more bob and weave and parry with counter strikes like boxing (you can't do this so much in Thai, since knees and elbows would ...


2

Define "grapple and take down". Some Muay Thai practitioners do a lot of clinch work, but generally takedowns are highly circumscribed. Techniques like hip throws, shots, suplexes and so on are are forbidden and defenses to such techniques are not generally practiced.


2

If you are a beginner in Muay Thai, the pad drills are key and should typically make up a good percentage of your gym time, along with western boxing exercises, footwork, skipping, etc. A gym should also include sparring drills and some light sparring, although most USA gyms will not include anything that increases liability risk with non-fighters. I am ...


2

Most martial arts are not balanced... like how BJJ lacks the striking power, yet so strong in ground games, and the other way around for Muay Thai. Since there are no take downs in Muay Thai match rules, they don't teach it much. You can either learn techniques to counter takedowns, learn ground arts from BJJ, Judo, etc. after being contented in Muay Thai, ...


1

I supose that you are talking about the low-kick aka kick to the thigh. I would like to make a difference between a kick with the front leg (1.) and a kick with the back leg (2.) (keep in mind that you are standing in fighting stance where one leg is in front and one back). My proposal would be the following: A kick with the front leg is faster because ...


1

The thing is to time your kick to make contact when your opponent's balance is on the leg that you are kicking. That way your kick will do more damage as they can't absorb much force with no give on the leg. If their balance is on the opposite leg, your kick can be checked. This is why small rapid steps during mobility gives you the time and balance to ...


1

Would you recommend training on mats or is training on the hard ground really a thing ? I would really recommend training on mats, no matter the art you do. I used to train on tiled floors, so we were very careful performing stunts like takedowns and jumping/flying kicks. In Taekwon-do the pattern Choong Moo has a move to jump and spin 360 degrees in ...


1

We've moved our hap ki do dojang from a place with mats to a place with super flooring as the floor and as yet there have been no feet injuries. We put mats in place when we're throwing and doing take downs. I agree that an instructor who pushes you through injury is a danger.


1

I get sore muscles all the time. Remember to get enough rest between training. I usually rest for an entire day, making sure I get enough sleep before my next workout. I have heard before about eating egg whites and drinking whey protein shakes help with muscle repair, but I have yet to try it. What really helps is a good massage on the sore area before ...


1

I don't have any gear recommendations, but FWIW suggest: spending more time setting up the opponent before kicking ensuring you're far enough from the opponent to lift the shin towards horizontal - clear of elbows - before extending your foot at the opponent leading the extension with the heal, with the ball of the foot pulled back towards you (and the ...


1

Honestly, when you get injured it is usually an oversight of timing and practice. I do not have any gear that I would recommend, but I would rather state this instead. Take the time to to land the kick. This just means slow down what you can with your mind and envision the kick before actually committing to it. If you do not see it land it very likely will ...


1

Muay Thai has a lot of clinch techniques, both offensive and defensive. K1 Muay Thai reduces and sometime forbids them, but there are hip, supplex and other throws while clinching to get free from opponents techniques. Buakaw Benchamek vs Enrico Kehl match has a lot of examples. Definitely no ground game, the refree will always stop the match and let both ...


1

I'm a trained MMA fighter that has focused in Muay Thai and Boxing and let me tell you while the inside leg kick doesn't look like much it certainly adds up and hurts like hell after a while. The purpose of them is to take away your opponent's base and while they may still be able to stand on that leg it certainly affects their power significantly. Also, as ...


1

Muay Thai moves list with links for pictures and demos. You could even contribute to update. http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/muay-thai-techniques



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