Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


6

It's not possible to learn a martial art at home with no partners. Even if you had partners and the necessary equipment, you don't have a knowledgeable instructor to point out your errors. You need someone experienced in the art to notice and show you when you're doing things wrong, to schedule your training, to push you, to arrange sparring matches and ...


6

It's supposed to be hard All serious training is supposed to remain difficult and challenging. If, as you say, you have improved your ability to get through warm-ups and training in general, then you're improving. You will keep improving the more you train. Key word: sporadically Regular training gets you more fit more quickly than irregular training. The ...


6

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


5

You're going to get a lot of push-back and they'll probably close this question, but you're not far off. Hard-sparring arts have proven themselves in ways that non-competitive arts have not. However, don't forget that other arts spar hard as well: san da/san shou is akin to kickboxing with fast throws and takedowns. However, like how all modern mixed artial ...


5

Obviously the instructor I worked with last night knows what he's talking about because, as I said, he is an accomplished fighter. This doesn't make him an accomplished teacher at all. During your travels you will encounter different instructors with differing quality. You need to recognise when they are either not the best instructor for you, or when ...


5

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


5

plowing through the drills as my partner moves in tandem There's a good version of this and a poisonous version of this. The good version is that your padholder is calling for combinations on the fly and you are responding mindlessly. That's super. That's mushin-no-shin. The bad version is that you are a rock-'em-sock-'em robot. If both of you are ...


4

There has been some discussion about the variables at play in this particular leg break, and leg breaks from checked leg kicks in general. It seems that turning the hip over during the kick helps prevent injuring oneself. There is also a difference between a leg kick being checked against the receivers shin or against their knee. The latter is stronger. ...


4

It seems to me that you're right about the fact that both the kicker and the checker should recieve the same amount of force. There are, however, other factors to take into consideration. When I practiced Gung Fu, we ofter perfomed exercises with the intent of strenghening our bones and building up protective cartilage. I would assume this is done in other ...


3

Yes, you have a high risk of getting your nose broken at some stage if you continue with Muay Thai. It isn't Tiddly Winks* - you will eventually get an injury, not just from landed punches but also from kicks. If you are at all attached to your nose (pun intended) the reconsider Muay Thai. Personally I've had my nose broken half a dozen times or more - the ...


3

As Jack Slack notes in his discussion of body punching in MMA, one of the most successful methods for setting up a punch to the body is forcing the opponent to shell up first: 0:04 Max Holloway uses a double left hook (or a lever punch) to keep his opponent's hands high before sneaking a palm down right hook in to the body (George Foreman style) and a ...


3

Based on the information provided, it sounds like you might benefit from placing more weight on the back leg. When I practice blocking with my lead leg, I find that it works much quicker if the weight distribution is more towards the back leg. It's hard to say without actually watching what you're doing, but it might be helpful to also bend the back leg ...


2

Your logical fallacy is: Appeal to Authority! This is actually really common in martial arts; we assume that because our instructor has experience in a competition, but all this means is that the instructor was better in that match (and often we're simply taking their word on that experience). Nearly every art teaches to not fully extend limbs – the extra ...


2

Try to kick a little wider and hit with your shin, unbalance them right as they step down on a jab for example. You can disrupt their balance with this kick. A few good ones will hurt their leg, even in sparring with shinpads on. You can attack with it; use it to set up strikes to the head, or you can counter his advance with it as he jabs in; it ruins the ...


2

I think that the reason that the checker receives less pain than the kicker is because of what part of the shin the checker uses to block the kick. The checker uses the upper part of the shin, close to the knee. The kicker uses the lower part of the shin, close to the foot. Due to the great thickness (or density, I'm not sure) of the upper shin, I think ...


2

It is ideal—in any martial science which delivers blows as heavy as those in Muay Thai—to have some support around the joints most frequently used. This is one reason why the ankle is wrapped—akin to having a knee brace. This provides support and reinforcement The second reason is for protection. That added layer of cloth, or whatever is used to wrap the ...


2

When you punch to the body don't keep standing up; you need to change your level. Dip through your legs, like a small squat and duck down, like you would if you duck a punch. You don't just bend at the waist and lean over, you squat down. From there you can punch your regular punch. (i.e. a straight/hook) Your ideas for when to throw the bodyshots are ...


2

Most of what has been said so far is correct and in your question you asked about reducing the impact. This is also a big factor. If your leg can move when hit, the impact is greatly reduced. If your foot is planted then you absorb the full force. This also places a large side load on your knee. Our legs are designed to take hits from the front, that is why ...


2

It is natural and expected to be tired and less precise towards the end of a ninety minute hard muay Thai class. There might be specific ways in which the instructor could run the class more optimally from a sports-science standpoint, but you should simply try to do the class as prescribed without taking extra breaks. (I could be more specific if you gave ...


1

It depends on your level of intensity. 90 minutes is a long time to go without a break. Lots of short 30 second to 1 minute breaks throughout training are normally more effective. After an hour of doing anything intensive, the body normally requires intake of food e.g. carb drink to replenish salt stores. If you are not resting to do even this, you will ...


1

Since you know Muay Thai, you know you have a lot of close range weapons. There isn't a need for a close range body punch most of the time. Punches are more for medium-short to medium-long distance. Using your elbows and knees are for totally short distance right? And I'm sure you've heard that from your Muay Thai class or whoever you train with. I'm not an ...


1

A good time is when you are circling away from their power hand. Throw some jabs or combos at their head and move away from their power. Then once in a while circle in closer to them and throw a punch at their kidneys. If they are right handed, circle to their left, punch with your right keeping your left guard up. They might get a bad angle punch with their ...


1

Why punch when you can kick/knee? Body punch is basically used in MT to hit areas like the solar plexus or rib cage. These areas are very very painful when hit, but are a bit hard to hit with knee or kicks in short range. Elbows won't reach as well. The thing is it is crucial to keep one hand up to protect while hitting with the other. Sneaking in a shot ...


1

Just as you have mentioned in your question I have noticed when I check a kick that the point of impact and the actual stoping point of the kick are far enough apart to allow a bit of dissipation of power from the kick You are also stoping the kick before full power can be reached. It is like the monk who throws his stomach into the punch then allows ...


1

It may prevent burns from scraping the ankle or the top of the foot on the canvas when slipping and getting back up. But I highly doubt that's the reason fighters wear them. I think it's more psychological. I remember when I was a young Taekwondo-ka, if I had wraps around my knees and ankles, it just felt like I could kick better. There's no science to ...


1

I don't know why kickboxers use ankle wraps, but I just happened to come across Reddit's /r/muaythai FAQ, which says they are for general ankle support: You may see thai fighters wearing what look like ankle braces while training or fighting. These are ankle supports that can help keep prevent a fighter from rolling his or her ankle while training or ...


1

There's some things you can learn by yourself, and some things you can't. Being a good fighter is definitely something you can't learn alone. With that said, here's some things to keep in mind: You don't necessarily need a full fledged instructor You do need someone to show you how to move, who is skilled enough to know the correct movement, timing and ...


1

As the consensus has already stated, you can't learn on your own, at least not in the beginning. There are just too many things that you need someone to actually show you. Once you have several years under your belt, typically about 5 solid years of learning, depending on the art 2 of 3 can suffice, then you can begin to learn from instructional videos, ...


1

I've seen people at the gym hurt themselves badly by kicking a heavy bag without any technique. People often come up to me after one of my heavy bag sessions to ask for tips. I tell them to go and get 27 years of training under their belts and then they'll begin to appreciate what they are actually doing. You can invest in all the right gear but you'll ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible