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18

From the standpoint of "is it a martial art" I think the answer is most definitively "yes." Many of the techniques it practices are very fitting in with other contemporary "martial arts." It teaches hand-to-hand combat and techniques such as dive rolls and breakfalls, among other things, that are commonly found in other martial arts. I can't really think ...


17

This depends what time period you refer to. Bushido was a not formally written till the Tokugawa period at a time of peace and rigid order. During the Sengoku Jidai, Bushido was thought of as mere guidelines in a similar way to the "chevalerie" of the middle age Europe. Ninja, or shinobi, were foremost spies. As such, of course, they had no honour and ...


9

"It depends." Partly on your goals, partly on what you hope to achieve via sparring. First things first: If shin guards are standard in your studio or if your instructor recommends them, then absolutely get them. You might talk to the senior students and see if they agree with the advice before springing for them, but this is one of the situations you ...


8

[NB: It is entirely likely that you will have no idea what I'm talking about here. Unless you have training in Bujinkan Ninpo Taijutsu, this will all be foreign to you, and this is purposely so. This is based on content from my own training manual, and is meant to aid students in their continued study of taijutsu and is not for everyone.] From the ...


7

It will be pretty difficult to do Judo alone. You can practice kung fu or any other martial art with forms (pre-arranged patterns) by yourself though. If you don't already know the martial art, though, you're setting yourself up for failure. Save yourself and any future teacher a few headaches and don't try to learn from DVDs or Youtube. Don't get me ...


6

There is no evidence to support the ninja being active much further than the Edo Period. Fujita Seiko was claimed to have taught ninjutsu at Rikugun Nakano Gakko (Nakano School for Military Intelligence), but there's no evidence to support these claims. Essentially, the historical record of the shinobi ends with the Shimabara Rebellion (1637-1638). "Men ...


6

For some reference, Ive been training in a ninjutsu school for a couple years now. From what I have gathered is that the ninjutsu aspect of the art is more of a state of mind rather than specific martial schools. The ninjutsu aspect focus's on getting out of line of sight and distracting the opponent. In fact the only unique ninjutsu kata i have found ...


5

Your option to learn new things is pretty limited. Forms have some, limited value Since you've mentioned kung fu as one of the directions you might go, there's plenty of video online of various forms and lots of books to back it up that you can do. This might help you develop leg strength and coordination, but your options for learning how it ...


5

Short answer - catch your shin on your opponent's knee or elbow in a roundhouse kick without shin guards and see how you feel. ;) Or, to look at it another way - Do targets defeat the purpose in training? Does a face mask or mouth guard defeat the purpose of training? Does practising with dull/not metal throwing stars or a wooden blade defeat the purpose? ...


5

If you're conditioning your body, shin guards defeat the purpose. If you're sparring, shin guards allow you to walk home afterwards.


5

If there's one thing I've learned over the years of training (Ninjutsu as well): It's better to have the equipment and not need it than to need it and not have it. If the instructor suggests them, buy them; he'll make your life hell if he thinks you're not taking his advice. Any sort of padding will make the training less realistic, but is that necessarily ...


5

If we assume, as others have described, that arts such as Kyudo, Kendo, Kickboxing, Kumdo, Escrima, etc. are martial arts, then we need to give a broad definition to the term. Martial Arts could, therefore, be described as: A codified system for the development of skills of or derived from the arts of war. In this way, we include under the banner 1.) ...


4

This is an interesting question and I'd like to hear other's views on this. I once read an article about diabetic foot ulcers. The articles explained that some diabetic lose sensation of pain from their feet. Your feet will automatically adjust weight distribution based on biofeedback. This happens subconsciously. However, since some diabetics don't feel ...


4

(Disclaimer, I train in Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu) Nin "JUTSU". The answer is in the name. Wikipedia Update Dr Kacem Zoughari discussing ninjutsu as an martial art. Is there a unique [set of martial arts] for the ninja? Not in my experience. The basic weapon work (bokken, bo, tanto) is very similar to other "traditional" Japanese martial arts, and so is ...


3

There is an additional angle here: the shin guards do not just protect your shins, they also protect your sparring partner from your shins. This can even be the more important thing, because while your shins can hurt a lot when hit, they are actually quite robust, they are very effective as blocks and can do great damage in attacks. Head, groin and gum ...


2

I would think it can definitely be considered an art because it evolves over time, and students who become teachers will favor certain techniques and skills, and will assimilate techniques and skills from other arts. It also is not a closed system bound by unbreakable rules - IOW if you come up with a new technique or skill that works then you can ...


1

I'd go strongly with no. The only people I've seen have full compound fractures of the tibia and fibula are Muay Thai fighters. They're also the ones to spend the most time conditioning their shins to toughen them up. Long term it weakens them. And really there's no point, you're not going to make them stronger not wearing shin guards, all you'll do is ...


1

Having seen your question in context, I can understand why you've asked it and I believe you're being a thorough practitioner by posing it. If I may (...well, I'm going to anyway :D ), Have you given thought to how you distribute your weight across your feet while you're standing relaxed? Also, how would the same question be answered were you sprinting... ...


1

First of all, Here (Youtube)'s some related eye/mind candy from the show Fight Science. Now I will ask you some other questions instead. Why are you in stance X? What do you want to be able to do from there? Anything you need to do will require energy transfers: from you to the ground, from the opponent to you (and maybe to the ground). Weight distribution ...


1

This is quite an interesting concept, and underlies why it can be advantageous to cross-train in more than one martial art. There are many variations and emphases between arts, and even within the same art across schools. Cross training can force you to rethink things you've already learned, and perhaps come up with a blend where each influence only makes ...


1

Yes they defeat the purpose, they prevent conditioning. Are you going to hurt a few times if you don't have them? Absolutely you will :) As you practice Ninjutsu I wouldn't expect the leg kicks to be raining down on your shins though. Any conditioning you do also has flow-on benefits - I play football (soccer) without shin guards, I haven't needed them for ...


1

yes an no :) any padding tends to make you spar less realistically. But then, 'realistic' is not always the goal.



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