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17

Here are bits that we do know: Gichin Funakoshi, born and raised in Okinawa, is the man who opened the first official, public karate dojo, and he did so on the main island of Japan. Prior to that, it was mostly studied at night, in secret. This was due to Japanese occupation - making the carrying of weapons illegal. Like all resourceful people do, they ...


3

Each style of Te (or Tii or Dii in the Okinawan language) is named for the region from which it originated; in this case, the Tomari village, which is in the greater Naha region. Tomari-te is not just a predecessor of Dillman's Ryukyu Kempo, but of Shorinji-ryu, Motobu-ryu, Shorin(Matsubayashi)-ryu and many others. Saying that Dillman teaches Tomari-te is a ...


3

By all accounts that I've read, Tomari-te was indeed a distinct style, but over time (and proximity to Shuri) largely blended with the more popular Shuri-te. Here is some information that might be helpful to you: http://karatedo.hakuakai-matsubushidojo.com/tomarite.html and: http://www.msisshinryu.com/history/tomari-te/


1

Long story short: The martial art with the name Karate started in Okinawa, but was/is made up of elements from different martial art, like the privious okinawan arts and kung fu, etc. As with all martial arts today, karate was developed from and influenced by many other arts, just like southern shaolin kung fu for example originally started as a way for ...


1

http://www.karatebyjesse.com/free-karatebyjesse-ebook-the-matsuyama-theory-feat-sensei-patrick-mccarthy/ is an interesting (cheesy too!) read on the topic. It seems plausible to me, and goes a bit more in depth into the origins of Karate than just "from Okinawa, originally from China" that's usually disseminated. The TL;DR version is that it specifically ...



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