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10

plowing through the drills as my partner moves in tandem There's a good version of this and a poisonous version of this. The good version is that your padholder is calling for combinations on the fly and you are responding mindlessly. That's super. That's mushin-no-shin. The bad version is that you are a rock-'em-sock-'em robot. If both of you are ...


6

Most modern aikidoka reject competition and sparring in any form. The philosophy is delineated well on the Aikiweb forums by Stefan Stenudd: [P]ractice is not about defeating an opponent, but about both participants being victorious by finding a truly peaceful solution and growing as human beings in the process. ... We train the aikido techniques ...


5

You're asking a lot of interconnecting but separate questions. Depending upon the view and the school, you will generally get different answers, but in Mikkyo (Esoteric Buddhism), these concepts (Fudōshin, Mushin, and Zanshin) are all derived from the teachings of Fudō Myō-ō. There is an order to these things, as I was taught it, so I will answer in that ...


5

It depends how one view "competition". If it is the desire to crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentation of their women ... Then, yeah, that style of competition is not compatible with Aikido. If it is a desire to learn effective techniques in a safe environment against opponents who vigorously resist so as to perfect your ...


3

Tomiki Aikido (aka Shodokan Aikido) holds tournaments and championships. There are competitive aspects in many branches of Aikido. There's quite little commonality between mainline aikido and the Tomiki schools. The idea was a "rationalization" of aikido by means of training in kata and competition, which Tomiki Kenji felt made the art more accessible (like ...


3

The first thing I'd say is make sure you're training isn't too focused on pad work. Pad work is designed for conditioning, you'll need to incorporate a good deal of shadow boxing, sparring and working on technique with your teacher or a more experienced fighter. But, since we're talking about pad work - there's two points I'd make 1) If you're working hard ...


2

If you are a beginner in Muay Thai, the pad drills are key and should typically make up a good percentage of your gym time, along with western boxing exercises, footwork, skipping, etc. A gym should also include sparring drills and some light sparring, although most USA gyms will not include anything that increases liability risk with non-fighters. I am ...


2

You are mixing up karate (the art) and karate-do (the "way", or "the whole", one's journey with karate). Most schools and/or instructors weave spiritual (philosophical) teachings into their syllabus and training, this comprises the "-do" and is distinct from karate as an art. There can be a lot of commonality of the "-do" across styles but that's due to ...


1

Those things are important, but they are secondary to Karate's (and any other martial art's) purpose: learning how to be a good fighter. All these other things are aspects you need to study to be a good fighter. But the goal is and always will be: how to be better at punching and getting punched than the other guy. If you lose focus on the primary goal, you ...


1

What might be the most optimal martial arts to improve level of focus? Any technical martial art (TKD, muay thai, judo, etc) in which the details of how a movement is performed are important. When working up a skill you would focus on improving a particular aspect of performing the movement, reflect on how well you are progressing, and consider new ...



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