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32

What you have heard is at least partly wrong. Heavy weight lifting can be about increasing size, but it is more often about directly increasing strength (it's part of the distinction between a bodybuilder and a powerlifter). The expression is that "no one gets bulky by accident." I also have never seen any reliable evidence that it makes you slower at ...


17

Weight training is very useful for martial arts. Sports scientist and martial artist Tom Kurz notes: Taekwondo master Hee Il Cho, famous for his powerful and precise jumping kicks, says, “Weight lifting can help athletes in any sport, including the martial arts. The more strength and size you have, the better you will perform. If two people weigh the ...


6

"Jin" means a trained force, somewhat like a force vector. "Fa" is to attack. In a more practical sense, fajin is a pronounced force that involves the whole body shaking and adding to the power. On a more titillating level, fa jin implies that the body relaxes to produce this burst of force. And it's true. So look for a way to store force and then ...


6

In the context of taijiquan it means power released suddenly from a correctly positioned body in the correct state of relaxation (song). The problem is that each of these steps above has to be explained. I'd rather point you at a blog post by Mike Sigman on fa jing as there are back-references there to other material. A common first step once you have ...


6

Before discussing what type of breathing generates power, you have to discuss how the body generates power. And even more importantly, how martial artists apply the principles of power. Martial arts is less interested in the physics definition of power--mainly because it is of little practical use. Typically, a martial artist is interested in the force ...


6

National Geographic did a fight science segment on martial arts kicks, featuring karate, tae kwon do and muay thai against capoeira. I was a little disappointed, in that they had Simon Rhee (karate) doing a front kick. Just because of the angles, motion and muscle involvement you will never get a front kick that outperforms a round or side kick. (Especially ...


5

Yes, power training will positively affect your grappling. It's important to understand how. All techniques require a degree of physicality. (Muscle is, after all, what moves your body in the first place.) Physicality includes strength (the ability to produce force), power (strength applied quickly), conditioning, and other attributes like balance, agility, ...


5

It seems you are suffering a rush of adrenaline when you get hit, hence why you speed up and can take (or are prepared to take) further hits. Overall, this rush of adrenaline is bad and should be avoided. Adrenaline is great when little old ladies need to lift crashed cars off people or you need to sprint into a burning building to save someone. While ...


5

First off I wouldn't worry about accidentally turning in to Arnold. Body builder forums are littered with people struggling to gain mass. It's much tougher than you think and you'd have to be REALLY focused on gaining mass and not just strength to even have much of a chance of that happening. While strength is not always paramount in many martial arts, it ...


5

Qi is basically a catch-all term used in Chinese martial arts and medicine to refer to unseen "energy" that surrounds and permeates everything in nature, including human beings, plants, animals, rocks, etc. Is Qi real? Yes, no, maybe. The answer depends on how Qi is defined. Some define it to be an amalgam of different things we can directly or indirectly ...


4

Absolutely it does! When I was training judo seriously, I was in the gym lifting weights 3x a week. In most martial arts, you don't want to get huge and bulky like THelper mentioned. But it's easy to train explosive power and balance and endurance, all of which will help your martial arts training.


4

There is a good article I came across on this subject.... http://www.damientrainor.com/2012/you-dont-need-to-win-in-sparring Some points + some of mine you don't need to win! meaning, the mindset about what you think sparring is is going to effect how you spar and what you will get from it. It will effect your emotional reaction to getting hit. if you ...


4

@Wudang tried to explain it from the point of view of a taijiquan practitioner, but in my mind, he mostly just glossed over the description of fajing and of how to get it working. The term fajin is composed of two words fa, which means "to send out, to issue" and jin is a word used for strength (quite interestingly, one of the pinyin translations I found ...


4

Power in your punches comes from; muscle to generate force, correct shifting of weight/movement, and coordination and technique to get the most of that (alignment of structure, correct angle of attack, timing, etc.). If you want more muscle to generate force, you need to do some kind of resistance training - that can be weights, it could be resistance ...


3

發 and 勁 Transliterated Fa-jin is two characters: Fa/發 - "to send out; to show (one's feeling); to issue; to develop; classifier for gunshots (rounds)" Jin/勁 - "stalwart; sturdy; strong; powerful; strength; energy; enthusiasm; spirit; mood; expression; interest" In the context of martial arts, a fair translation of fa-jin would be "emitting force" or ...


3

I like Dave Leipmann's response where he makes it clear that you improve with both skill and power / strength training. You combine both for the best overall effect. One of the comments I often hear in BJJ circles is that women often learn better / faster than men, because they don't have the muscle strength that men do. And so they will stop and try to ...


3

Is there anything I can do to increase the power of my turning kick? Make sure you have the full rotation. For a roundhouse, your standing foot should be close to 90 degrees at the end of the kick. You can check this by going up against a wall and extending your leg out to kick (using wall to balance as needed). When it reaches the full extension, ...


3

Bud Jeffries has a great article on this; http://www.strongerman.com/articles/martial-arts-and-strength/ He's a strongman, not a bodybuilder, so is much more in line with what martial artists should be interested in. He addresses the pros and cons, particularly noteworthy is that with his focus on strength training he doesn't train as much for skill, so ...


3

If training with a sensei is not an option at the moment, understand that it limits both your knowledge and what it takes to self-correct. A trained eye can see where you are having issues. Since that has been harped on with just about every answer, I'll move on to the technique. Use a Heavy Bag Keep in mind that there is a huge difference between ...


3

In my meager boxing experience, I've been taught to assiduously avoid cocking back before a strike. It telegraphs your intentions. The power that it provides would be better developed through better body mechanics in the hips and legs. However, if you throw a technique that loads you up towards the right rear, such as a right round kick or a left straight ...


3

There are two schools of thought based on two distinct principles as to how to generate a punch with maximum effectiveness. In schools similar to karate the force comes from pushing after you connect with the target. Someone punching in this manner will train to strengthen their muscles in order to apply more force. These punches have reletively short ...


2

Around the beginning of 2012, I spent some time online trying to locate a freely available design for a martial arts board holder. At the time there was nothing available*. So after taking some inspiration from a few commercially available compact designs (see: http://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&q=board+holder+martial+arts) I came up with my own. In ...


2

Coming from a taekwondo background, I see a lot of balance issues come from "banana" alignment. When you strike with your back-kick (or more commonly, side-kick), you want your body to be in a straight line from heel through your hips to your head, but it's very common for people to lean forwards to look around their body, which will lead to over-balancing ...


2

Which kind of breath provides the most striking power? Peppermint. The crucial thing for striking is coordinating a transfer of energy between the legs/hips and shoulders/arms (even when kicking, as you're trying to use the inertia/momentum of the upper body to help the hips/legs accelerate). That transfer always involves the "gut" muscles. Whether ...


2

Weight training can be beneficial, and some martial arts have a set of supplementary exercises (in Okinawa Goju Ryu we call it Hojo Undo) where you use tools like Chi'ishi (stone on a stick), Ishi-sashi (stone handles - ancient type of Kettle bell) and Nigiri Gamen (a couple of vases with necks in a size to fit a palm) for weight training. The advantage of ...


2

The answer is probably "it depends". Some examples: If you're employing the cross without preparation as the first technique in a combination it is most likely better not to telegraph your attack by "winding-up" a lot. If your cross is a follow-up on a technique on a jab/kick from the other side it is easier to conceal the wind-up in the previous ...


2

I see Dave Liepmann's already touched on what I want to say, which is that thinking about shoulders is a cart-before-the-horse mentality, and instead you should focus on your use of legs and how they're accelerating your hips, then how the torso drags the shoulders after the hips. Once you've mastered that to the point where you can pass a sizable ...


2

There are plenty of articles on the Internet (for example, http://www.saskgtf.com/theory.html) that talk about the 'science' of sine wave, but none of those articles appear to have any references to actual studies. So, no evidence and no links, I'm afraid.


2

As Steve Weigand mentioned in the comments it is a very difficult task to objectively measure. Having trained ITF for many years I would struggle to perform a punch powerfully without sine wave. It also takes a lot of practice to get the sine motion right. So to measure someone without sine wave and then teach them - they would have to train it. Some of the ...


2

Expect disagreement about both ideas of how to generate power and in explanations, because every style has its own theories about how to best generate power. The training for how to generate power for particular techniques may also be beyond the average person, as in stretching required for head kicks, for example. Also remember that the maximal or most ...



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