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Yes, power training will positively affect your grappling. It's important to understand how. All techniques require a degree of physicality. (Muscle is, after all, what moves your body in the first place.) Physicality includes strength (the ability to produce force), power (strength applied quickly), conditioning, and other attributes like balance, agility, ...


3

I like Dave Leipmann's response where he makes it clear that you improve with both skill and power / strength training. You combine both for the best overall effect. One of the comments I often hear in BJJ circles is that women often learn better / faster than men, because they don't have the muscle strength that men do. And so they will stop and try to ...


2

Is there anything I can do to increase the power of my turning kick? Make sure you have the full rotation. For a roundhouse, your standing foot should be close to 90 degrees at the end of the kick. You can check this by going up against a wall and extending your leg out to kick (using wall to balance as needed). When it reaches the full extension, ...


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Here's another angle to look at (speaking from personal experience). As you go up in belt levels - chances are you'll be using much less strength as the 'crowd thins' in the upper belt ranks eventually. A bunch of our upper belts left so we don't have many browns/black belts as we used to. Being a purple - I'm often one of the highest belt ranks at my ...


1

Power will always help but when you're up against someone who has a decent amount of skill such as a Purple Belt your strength will be close to useless. I've experienced this myself as I'm 6ft 2 about 92 kgs and used to do plenty of weight training, when I first got on the mat I would be dominated by smaller weaker guys who were using technique alone against ...


1

Kick through the bag, instead of into it. The snap is merely to minimise the chance of you getting your leg grabbed and your crown jewels turned to scrambled eggs. Apart from that, you need to ensure your hips are loose and that you are limber. The greater your range of motion and the larger the arc of your kick, the more velocity will be behind it. Look at ...


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There are too many variables to consider to be able to pick one out and say "This is why", and you don't specify what kind of a "turning" kick you are doing. This could be a reverse, a spin, or simply a round kick. To address Dungarth's point, when you do your front kick, do you draw your entire leg and knee up to your chest and then push out straight ...



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