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6

There is no such thing as force generation without muscles. All animals use muscles to pull tendons which connect to joints. That causes the joints to move in a given direction, which causes limbs to move. What you may mean is that Systema might use "internal mechanics" in a similar manner that other "internal" styles such as T'ai Chi, Bagua, and Xing-Yi ...


4

The trick is to move inside their range. Then it's a case of the bigger opponent having to fend off the smaller one because you're no longer in their striking range. Bruce Lee was a short fellow, and he used a combination of parries to move into range, then do things like backfist, rutts, uppercuts, tight hooks, overhead hook to get the job done. in ...


4

Power in your punches comes from; muscle to generate force, correct shifting of weight/movement, and coordination and technique to get the most of that (alignment of structure, correct angle of attack, timing, etc.). If you want more muscle to generate force, you need to do some kind of resistance training - that can be weights, it could be resistance ...


3

Your size and strength is relative. Skill level matters more, or the ability to acquire the skill and the skill of the opponent. Check out this you tube channel here , this guy is really good at explaining the concept of energy and power and it can be applied to multiple martial arts. Ultimately, its better to know a few techniques very well, instead of ...


3

Every muscle in your body pulls and they only pull. They only generate force while contracting and it's the only way your body can generate force. In order for your body to function, every muscle must also have one or more other muscles pulling in direct opposition and under normal usage the muscles are constantly straining against each other while ...


3

There are two schools of thought based on two distinct principles as to how to generate a punch with maximum effectiveness. In schools similar to karate the force comes from pushing after you connect with the target. Someone punching in this manner will train to strengthen their muscles in order to apply more force. These punches have reletively short ...


3

Expect disagreement about both ideas of how to generate power and in explanations, because every style has its own theories about how to best generate power. The training for how to generate power for particular techniques may also be beyond the average person, as in stretching required for head kicks, for example. Also remember that the maximal or most ...


2

As Steve Weigand mentioned in the comments it is a very difficult task to objectively measure. Having trained ITF for many years I would struggle to perform a punch powerfully without sine wave. It also takes a lot of practice to get the sine motion right. So to measure someone without sine wave and then teach them - they would have to train it. Some of the ...


2

There are plenty of articles on the Internet (for example, http://www.saskgtf.com/theory.html) that talk about the 'science' of sine wave, but none of those articles appear to have any references to actual studies. So, no evidence and no links, I'm afraid.


2

Regarding punch power Some basic physics together with some thoughts on punches and kicks may help: [impulse] = [mass] × [velocity] It is much better to improve speed by technique (!) and exercises (which may include weight training, but as I take it in another sense than you think of it) than weight, if you want to hit harder: Becoming heavier ...


2

Bruce Lee was fascinated with this also, so if you study his writings it is all about reducing the amount of effort used to deliver the most powerful blow in the shortest time possible. For example the "straight blast" would be thrown on the shortest line of attack (straight) and speed*mass to deliver the power into the blow.


2

Your equalizers are to fight unfair: attack by surprise, use weapons that the other side doesn't have, attack with methods that harm a person in such a way the injuries impair response regardless of the long term consequences to the person you are attacking. You'll notice that competitions remove all of these things - you're expecting a fight, you have an ...


2

If weapons are available, these quickly equalize situations, but I suspect you are interested in unarmed situations. There are no best techniques that always work. Any decent martial arts system will have techniques that do not rely on you being bigger and stronger than your opponent. These should work for you provided you have sufficiently trained. Wong ...


2

Qi manipulation, psychic phenomenon, and the like are pure hokum. The only internal forces that people can generate to effect the outside world are via our muscle tissue. There may be some subtle techniques for expressing non-linear movement (e.g. a reeling/coiling strike, or a fa jin/explosive strike), but ultimately the energy is being delivered through ...


2

Weight training can be beneficial, and some martial arts have a set of supplementary exercises (in Okinawa Goju Ryu we call it Hojo Undo) where you use tools like Chi'ishi (stone on a stick), Ishi-sashi (stone handles - ancient type of Kettle bell) and Nigiri Gamen (a couple of vases with necks in a size to fit a palm) for weight training. The advantage of ...


2

I was actually doing some research on body knockouts last year, and I can give you some of the information I've dug up. It's not as detailed as what you're looking for ("best methods"), but it is some useful information nonetheless. Liver, Location, Access The liver sits under the right side of the ribcage. It's mostly, but not entirely protected by the ...


1

So you want to punch someone's liver? Why liver? I hear a large number of people shouting. If you are going to hit an organ, why not the brain, groin, stomach, eyes, kidneys? Why pick the hardest to hit? These are questions we won't be answering. Mr Robertson wants to inflict some liver damage on others. The liver is protected by the ribs. So you want to ...


1

A proper liver shot, needs to be prepared with some kind of combination. Usually a punch combo to the head so your oponent brings his hands up. The next thing would be to hit his right, lower rib cage in a 45° angle in un upward-motion with the intention to go through him towards his left shoulder.


1

Jiu-jitsu can be used to null-ify your oponent regardless of his size and weight for example. But if the guy knows a thing or two, it might get complicated UNLESS YOU ARE AT A VERY HIGH LEVEL! (checkout the first UFCs for examples) Judo applies the same principle (there is a Youtube video of a 70+ year old man with a x degree black belt that can't be taken ...


1

Honestly, if the size, mass, and/or strength disparity is wide enough overcoming such an opponent is not possible without some sort of force multiplier (e.g. a weapon). This is also too broad a question to realistically answer. There are too many unknown factors. What are the physical discrepancies between combatants? What are both combatant's skill ...


1

It is physically correct with greater weight and muscle power you will definitely be having a greater impact while punching. The greater weight will have a greater momentum as soon as the muscles give you the speed the impact will be doubled. momentum = mass X velocity Muscle Power is more important than weight, as heavier bodies are much more difficult to ...


1

I am familiar with the term fa-jin used in contrast with the term jun chi (sp?). These are two different ways that force can be applied to a target. fa-jin - An explosive strike, with intent to shatter or something similar. jun chi - A heavy push, with intent to displace. From a physics point of view, this means fa-jin is maximizing the instantaneous ...


1

I've had a solid 2 years of strength training including Olympic weightlifting before starting martial arts, which I've pursued for over ten years since my first real fight. Strength training for minimum two years is a must for adding the necessary bulk to compete in fighting at a high level, but to really stand-out, you need weightlifting. That's why I was a ...


1

Strength training alongside of doing your martial art of choice is key. I've pumped my training from 1 hour to 2 hours every day and over 1 month I've increased 10 fold in my technique and power. This is all alongside my strength training of 1 to 5 reps max and it works


1

Weight training is fantastic for martial arts training, but you have to do it with a goal in mind. Ask yourself which areas you need to improve strengthwise, which areas have muscles that you will use (directly or indirectly) in practicing your techniques. Also, if you do a sport like Taekwondo, keep in mind that, contrary to popular belief, while muscles ...


1

I have found that strength training once a week and power endurance once a week alongside BJJ, Thai boxing, boxing and JKD concepts helps a lot in my fitness and strength; however, if I do strength or power endurance more than once a week, I slow down and burn out. Everyone's body reacts differently; spreading my training out over a period of time makes a ...



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