Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Yes, martial arts could help you, just as any diversion that you enjoy could help you. Martial arts does help with focus, clarity, peace of mind, body improvement, a whole host of things, but so do many many other activities, both physical and non. I would not suggest a specific style, but spend a few months going around to different studios of different ...


11

Traditional the three most important things in Real Estate are 1) location 2) location 3) location. In martial arts, the three most important things are: 1) Sensei 2) Sensei 3) Sensei 4) Dojo. (or Sifu, if you're inclined that way) I'm coming late to this question and I think the others have provided very valuable comments, but one thing I saw missing was ...


10

Yes At least, it worked out very well for me. I am in a high-stress, rack-em-and-stack-em IT job. When I started my current run of martial arts training seriously about ten years ago, the constant context switching and demands of my job were making me distracted, short-tempered, and less happy than I wanted to be. Finding a hobby that was very different ...


10

What I suggest is: Find a good dojo. The dojo will be more important than the art and its location will help greatly. Closer to home would make it easier on the way back, closer to work would make it easier on the way in. Since you want this to gain peace of mind, maybe a dojo that has some meditation would help. Maybe you just need an intense physical ...


10

Have you considered an MMA ground and pound dummy or a wrestling throw dummy? There are several types out there and not all of the work. I would consider looking for one with full length arms and is sturdy enough to nearly stand on it's own. Some examples: Throw Dummy: Ground and Pound: Personally I think the throw dummy would work better than the ...


9

I suspect that what you are seeing in martial arts movies is more of a cultural artifact than anything: A representation of what that culture considers valuable, as opposed to a representation of an absolute association. In capoeira music is played for (strongly) cultural reasons as a way of setting the style and the energy of the game, but not because it ...


9

What you are asking for is a tall order. If you live on the ground floor, noise issues are more easily addressed because you don't have to worry about impact noises with the floor. Impact noises are the hardest to control, and they radiate through rigid structures like floor joists rather well. I have no affiliation with the site, but there are a great ...


8

All due respect (there is no nice way to say this) but it seems from your question that you have no clue what you could be getting yourself into. Don't get me wrong, martial arts can help you in a lot of ways. But from the phrasing of your question it seems like you are doing it on a whim, like you were searching for solutions, you rolled the dice and ...


7

Things that I have found help me with specifically wrist locks, but some of which are adaptable to other forms of practice as well. Grab a Partner for an Extra Day This is really the best option, but also logistically the most difficult. Talk to the other students in your class and see if one of the more experienced ones would be willing to add an extra ...


7

Fighting vs. Martial Arts First off, let me approach this from a different direction; what we see in movies and on TV is dance. It's a choreographed series of movements to display an idea of fighting, not actual combative action. The martial arts are codified systems to train a person to fight. In modern times, more spiritual and psychological meaning has ...


7

Okay well if you do wing chun that is great, so do i! Yes it is definitely worth practicing alone. Here are some of the things i do: Get a 3 section wall bag and a wet towel (with somewhere to hang it). Assuming you have correct form on your sun fist punch, you should practice punching the center of a wet towel with out any water flicking back onto you. And ...


7

Practice on your own is pretty much an unavoidable element of the martial way past a certain point. Other than developing your body through conditioning exercise (Bruce Lee's plyometrics are a good starting point), you can develop your body through breathing exercises (the Systema DVDs about breathing are pretty interesting and insightful). It is important ...


6

Fitness for martial arts doesn't mean just strength or aerobic capacity. It also requires flexibility and agility. Please don't ignore stretching--both in order to be better, and also to train safer. Injuries often inhibit, even preclude, eager training. (Said by the guy who's not trained seriously for a month while nursing a shoulder injury.) When I moved ...


6

Disclaimer: I am a beginner in both judo and physical culture. My views on strength, conditioning, and technique should be viewed with skepticism. You're right that training once a week is insufficient. Most people won't see much progress in either physical condition or skills at less than two days a week minimum. I'll address solutions in the context of ...


6

Based on your comments above, I would definitely recommend that you start seeking an instructor. If you were looking for pure self-defense, then you could start doing things on your own, like understanding the different types of attacks - a bar aggressor has a very different motive from that of a professional criminal, like a mugger or rapist, so their ...


5

I get severe problems with my back and joints. For example, I was training rigorously five to six times a week for about five months while preparing for a grading test. Immediately after, I went on a relaxing holiday, where I spent most of the time in stationary position. A week into my holiday, I got serious problems with my back – as in, I couldn't walk or ...


5

Without sparring partners and a coach, your best bet for solo practice is strength and conditioning work with a little heavy bag work, forms practice, and the like.


4

As Iaroslav said, some sort of elastic resistance equipment around a sturdy pole is your best bet. Personally I have found that resistance tubes ( http://www.amazon.co.uk/Reebok-Resistance-Tube-Level-Black/dp/B002KMK57O/ref=sr_1_4?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1328173425&sr=1-4 ) are better resistance wise, however the bands ( ...


4

Taiko are large drums of Japanese origin that require movement of the whole body to be properly played. They're played whilst standing, carry their own kamae (postures), and have a distinct rhythm; all of these can be applied to martial arts training. There are not, so far as I know, any specific correlations, however, between aptitude with a musical ...


4

In an attempt to answer this question objectively, and on topic: According to A Buzzle.com Article on the Effects of Music on the Brain, music has the following effects on the brain: Increases Concentration Levels, Improves Memory: It is known that music helps increase your concentration levels. [...] Research has shown that the silence between two ...


4

The practitioner's body type makes a difference in their experience of a given art, but generally doesn't need to play a significant role in choosing a martial art. People with long limbs have certain advantages in striking arts and Brazilian jiu-jitsu. Their longer reach makes them better able to execute a long-range striking strategy, and may make one's ...


4

Not at all, some of the best martial artists i have seen with judo have been very short. I have seen short people from china who are better boxers than my 6 foot tall friends who do boxing. also real tai chi is harder than wushu in terms at acrobatics, so who wrote that article seems badly informed. For my wing chun class some of the younger students who ...


4

Bleeding is a big deal. You are damaging yourself and that is bad. You should wear protective gear, improve your technique, and punch less hard. In addition, I hope you clean all the biohazard that you leaked on the bag...


4

Wear protection Cant stress this enough Irrespective of what some schools may teach, it is detrimental to you and your well being to constantly increase your tenacity in hopes that your body would get "used to it" someday. Train smart. Master technique. If your body deteriorates, you have lost your primary weapon. Take care of your body at all costs.


3

Given what you're looking for, I'd lean towards recommending Yoga over martial arts. That also hits the question you were asking about preparation in terms of exercise. The other thing you'll want to look into is weightlifting for strength (incidentally, any MA instructor who tells you strength is unimportant isn't worth learning from). Do Yoga and/or ...


3

Martial Arts, Yoga, Gymnastics, Aerobics or any exercise for that matter,their purpose is the same. It is to fully understand your body, realize your physical and mental fitness and live a pleasant, long and a healthy life. There is nothing like "being-suited". Everyone in a reasonable physical state can attempt all of the above under proper guidance. :) ...


3

A process cannot be understood by stopping it. Understanding must move with the flow of the process, must join it and flow with it. -- Dune, Frank Herbert I do not know of any books that do this, but you are better off watching Youtube videos, like this one, which describes heaven and earth. You're better off looking for 'heaven six' first, though. The key ...


3

I don't know about "noticeably." That depends on the perceiver. All musical instruments will exercise impeccable timing, tuning in, and flow. Music is meant to be played with others or for others, so you won't exercise those skills if you only play by yourself. Specific instruments may exercise fine motor dexterity or breath control, but that depends on the ...


3

I've seen some people using elastic rope attached to a wall to to practice certain throws. Elastic bandage is widely used for that. Thus it is not good for every throw, but is rather cheap and simple to use.


3

I was practicing Capoeira and Thai Boxing (separately, did Capoeira before switching to Thai Boxing) when I had a full-time job as a software developer. I am also doing Thai Boxing while I am pursuing my Masters degree and work as a part-time software developer, so the answer is YES. Now I did not take part in any competitions for Thai Boxing, but that is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible