Hot answers tagged

14

Generally, no This is generally not true - there are many defensive arts where you improve your fighting skills right away and reach a basic proficiency within a matter of a few weeks or months at most (skill wise, at least, fitness can take longer to produce). Many weapon based arts that are close to their original use also have this same thing - if you ...


5

I think there is a 'superman' complex that many beginners suffer from. A notion that they are doing well in class maybe won a competition or two. Get to a real fight and the natural instinct to run our be aggressive is lost to trying to figure out whether to throw a punch or a kick. This, along with semi or light contact training can give a false sense of ...


4

It's not a problem unless you're training them wrong. If a school teaches you to FIGHT, you'll get better with each passing day. If the school only teaches you how to pass tests and look good while doing Kata, then you might have a problem.


3

This is not a question of whether or not you have any martial martial arts training. The issue is self perception and subconscious signals. If you are uncertain about yourself and feel insecure, you may be thinking "oh no I'm going to be mugged" while walking about late at night. This self-hypnosis creates an air of uncertainty and insecurity, which ...


3

One may in fact become more vulnerable to attacks because he goes to meet attack in situation, where he would have avoided it before. Practicing martial arts make people more confident and eager to show their new skills while frequently overrating it.


2

Below is a link pertaining to a 3 month white belt who used Kotagaeshi to defend himself. It goes with the adage that self defence is 80% confidence. Basically a lot of things will work from a lot of martial arts, it's having the presence of mind at the time when your adrenaline is pumping that counts in that context. It has controls, pins and throws, ...


2

Most of the techniques in aikido are based on creating an opening for you to manipulate/control your opponent through the use of leverage and/or pain. In order to do that you are going to have to get within arms reach of your opponent or literally toe to toe in some cases :). Aikido really shines when you can create that opening and use one of techniques ...


2

If you refer only if the reaction time of instinctive reflexes being slowed by starting to train a martial art because you are thinking what to do, the answer is no. Instinctive reflexes like crouching or closing the eyes when going to be hit, are really hard to modify. It doesn't take a few days not even months to modify them, and will be automatically ...


1

Well. Wing chun has forms for this purpose. There are six forms for solo training, starting with Siu Nim Tau. But keep in mind that form aim at training of you muscle memory so your body gets used to the moves. Apart from this there is never enough of footwork and punching training. Once you start with Chi Sau you will need a partner. There is no way around ...


1

What I ended up doing is going to a shoe repair shop and have them replace the velcro straps on my gloves, really happy with the result.


1

Suggest that you first check the side of velcro on your gloves that has the little hooks on it. Sometimes you can get a buildup of lint or other material that prevents it from grabbing on to the velvet/felt side. If this is the case you can tease out the lint and it should start grabbing better. If the wrap still won't hold then sewing a new layer of velcro ...


1

What I took from Aikido is to discover the least harmful way to respond to any attack, to subdue your opponent in the most complete and least harmful way possible, and to practice these responses so frequently that they become the automatic instinctive response to said attacks. I think it was intended to be almost like a non-lethal krav maga in a way, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible