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14

Generally, no This is generally not true - there are many defensive arts where you improve your fighting skills right away and reach a basic proficiency within a matter of a few weeks or months at most (skill wise, at least, fitness can take longer to produce). Many weapon based arts that are close to their original use also have this same thing - if you ...


5

I think there is a 'superman' complex that many beginners suffer from. A notion that they are doing well in class maybe won a competition or two. Get to a real fight and the natural instinct to run our be aggressive is lost to trying to figure out whether to throw a punch or a kick. This, along with semi or light contact training can give a false sense of ...


4

It's not a problem unless you're training them wrong. If a school teaches you to FIGHT, you'll get better with each passing day. If the school only teaches you how to pass tests and look good while doing Kata, then you might have a problem.


3

Real fights are not constrained by rules. There is no referee to pull you apart from a clinch, or rules against bashing the back of your head. Nothing prevents multiple people from attacking. There is no padding. If someone puts you on the ground, they can stomp you. Real fights are not like the movies, where people are bashed in one sequence and ...


3

"Winning" in self defense is whatever makes you safer. Within that context, if you can get yourself out of danger, sooner, with more reliable methods, that's better. If someone is trying to hurt you, you don't know if they have friends on the way, if they're going to pull out a weapon or make something into a weapon and so on. However, "first few ...


3

This is not a question of whether or not you have any martial martial arts training. The issue is self perception and subconscious signals. If you are uncertain about yourself and feel insecure, you may be thinking "oh no I'm going to be mugged" while walking about late at night. This self-hypnosis creates an air of uncertainty and insecurity, which ...


3

One may in fact become more vulnerable to attacks because he goes to meet attack in situation, where he would have avoided it before. Practicing martial arts make people more confident and eager to show their new skills while frequently overrating it.


2

If you refer only if the reaction time of instinctive reflexes being slowed by starting to train a martial art because you are thinking what to do, the answer is no. Instinctive reflexes like crouching or closing the eyes when going to be hit, are really hard to modify. It doesn't take a few days not even months to modify them, and will be automatically ...


2

Below is a link pertaining to a 3 month white belt who used Kotagaeshi to defend himself. It goes with the adage that self defence is 80% confidence. Basically a lot of things will work from a lot of martial arts, it's having the presence of mind at the time when your adrenaline is pumping that counts in that context. It has controls, pins and throws, ...


1

Actually there are many skills that can be developed through solo practice and some of them even benefit from the isolation. Evasion skills, such as those gained through Parkour or Ninjutsu training allow you to develop tools of self-defense without resorting to fighting and improve both physical skills as well as timing and strategic thinking. Speed bags, ...


1

Reading these answers I have to ask how many real fights some of the posters have been in... A lot of what's taught in self-defence classes goes out the window when it happens for real, and as for avoidance being best, a lot of the time you won't be able to avoid it if it happens. Going in fast, hard and aggressive is the best way to handle it in my ...


1

All the answers here are valid but I would like to add some Info from another perspective to the questions. From my experience, I would say that your statement with "who first strikes" wins the game, is true - to some point. It is valid for a specific type of aggressor, someone unprepared that might had a couple of drinks, maybe trying to show off in front ...


1

Avoidance is the Best Defense Be aware of your surroundings. You're in a parking garage, fumbling with your keys, and you see someone running towards you, who appears less-than-wholesome (and you're unsure if you can get into a safe place before they arrive)? Run away! Someone pulls a knife on you? Run away! Do you have a choice between well lit, well ...


1

TL;DR The duration of a fight bares no relation to the risk of injury as clearly demonstrated by countless matches. Attacking first leaves one open to very serious legal repercussions. Expecting to be attacked at all times and places is a mark of paranoia. The duration of a fight has nothing to do with your probabilities of being injured. The nature of ...


1

What I took from Aikido is to discover the least harmful way to respond to any attack, to subdue your opponent in the most complete and least harmful way possible, and to practice these responses so frequently that they become the automatic instinctive response to said attacks. I think it was intended to be almost like a non-lethal krav maga in a way, ...


1

What I ended up doing is going to a shoe repair shop and have them replace the velcro straps on my gloves, really happy with the result.


1

Well. Wing chun has forms for this purpose. There are six forms for solo training, starting with Siu Nim Tau. But keep in mind that form aim at training of you muscle memory so your body gets used to the moves. Apart from this there is never enough of footwork and punching training. Once you start with Chi Sau you will need a partner. There is no way around ...



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