Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


6

Fighting disciplines (such as Muay Thai, boxing etc.) Can cause multiple eye traumas. If your vision becomes blurry or if the pain doesn't go away you might want to consider consulting a physician. You can learn more on potential eye injury from blow to the head by reading these articles: Giovinazzo VJ, Yannuzzi LA, Sorenson JA, Delrowe DJ, Cambell EA. ...


5

The fist should move as little as possible. The power of the uppercut comes from slightly dipping in the knees while turning the hip and then pushing from the hip. The elbow shouldn't move behind the body at all. The movement should look a little like the elbow is fixed at the hip and being pushed by the hip rotation/thrust. Only at the very end the arm ...


4

NullPointer, it's a parable and it's either (a) impossible or (b) just a case of the guy healing & the doctors being wrong. Just a parable; there is no single guy this is based on. I believe the lesson is a little less than what you state; that a positive attitude can help you overcome obstacles including healing, but not necessarily to do the ...


4

A - Elements of good punch Hit with your shoulder not hand (focus on the shoulder and not the peripherals). Hips turning in the direction of the attack Rear leg pushing hips in the direction of the attack (on ball of the foot) Position of front leg should be enough to hold you in place and not falling forwards or becoming stuck in place. As a general rule: ...


4

I believe the story you are referring to in Zen In The Martial Arts is the chapter, "Confident Seeing" on page 109. The instructor was Sam Brodsky and he was doing a demonstration for his students in which he intended to break 9 one inch slabs of concrete with one punch of his fist. While only breaking 7 slabs he had pulverized many of the small bones in ...


4

As an instructor of Krav maga and Israeli Combat Systems (ICS), I can tell you there are very specific reasons for not turning at the end of a punch. Krav Maga and ICS are meant to teach people quickly and effectively defend themselves in a street fight. Unlike a tournament or cage fight, anytime you get into a street fight, your skills will deteriorate ...


4

Your question is actually three parts: 1) How do I make a strong punch? 2) Where can I hit someone to have the best result? 3) How do I deal with multiple attackers? My answer to the first question is: Find a boxing gym and have them teach you how to punch hard without breaking your hand. Wrist strength is what you seem to think is the most important ...


4

I just love those self defence myths. First, unless you have trained punching people with keys in between your fingers, the result will be as much (if not more) damage to yourself as with the target. You may drop your keys as a result of the impact and pain which means that you lost your keys. Punch Injuries: Insights into Intentional Closed Fist Injuries ...


3

depends on how hard you spar and how well you protect your dome. You shouldn't get a broken nose in sparring unless you're not wearing headgear and/or getting ready for a fight. Otherwise you should have headgear on and not going full force anyway. But different gyms, different flavors.


3

Well depending on the Krav Maga school it may or not be right. As far as I know from attending some IKMF training the punch is not rotated but it is not perfectly vertical either. The way to do it as I have been told was the position the you get when you raise your arm straight in front of you in a natural position and clench the fist. Bas Rutten, a former ...


3

There's a story by Joe Hyams in his book Zen in the Martial Arts that is probably what you're thinking of, or comes from the same root. The tile breaking sounds different, but the "men working" visualization and miraculous recovery is identical.


3

I'm not a boxer, I have almost zero boxing experience, but I've seen several valid approaches to footwork during the jab. The two I've been shown most commonly are a Jack Dempsey-style jab with a heavy forward step and a jab with no step, pivoting the front foot on the ball of the foot. I can't speak to the jabs you've seen or the examples you describe, but ...


3

When you punch to the body don't keep standing up; you need to change your level. Dip through your legs, like a small squat and duck down, like you would if you duck a punch. You don't just bend at the waist and lean over, you squat down. From there you can punch your regular punch. (i.e. a straight/hook) Your ideas for when to throw the bodyshots are ...


3

Yes, you have a high risk of getting your nose broken at some stage if you continue with Muay Thai. It isn't Tiddly Winks* - you will eventually get an injury, not just from landed punches but also from kicks. If you are at all attached to your nose (pun intended) the reconsider Muay Thai. Personally I've had my nose broken half a dozen times or more - the ...


3

As Jack Slack notes in his discussion of body punching in MMA, one of the most successful methods for setting up a punch to the body is forcing the opponent to shell up first: 0:04 Max Holloway uses a double left hook (or a lever punch) to keep his opponent's hands high before sneaking a palm down right hook in to the body (George Foreman style) and a ...


3

As it mentions in the comments, the idea is to have the keys protrude from within your fingers so that you can scratch someone. I personally would not do this. There are reasons for this: It takes a bit of time to setup. If I am attacked, it will probably be without warning, therefore I will not be able to get my keys between my fingers in time. If I ...


3

There's basically two ways to use a normal set of keys for self defense. 1. Between the knuckles Held protruding between the knuckles you might be able to get a gouge on someone, particularly in the eyes, neck or cheek. The problem is that you have to hold it in such a way that the keys do not slide back into your hand while you're doing it, and it often ...


3

In my meager boxing experience, I've been taught to assiduously avoid cocking back before a strike. It telegraphs your intentions. The power that it provides would be better developed through better body mechanics in the hips and legs. However, if you throw a technique that loads you up towards the right rear, such as a right round kick or a left straight ...


2

Body shots are usually taken from the side and aimed at the floating ribs. Otherwise they are only employed when in a clinch. NEVER lunge your head forward. Here's a nice video showing the proper technique.


2

As an instructor of Krav maga and Israeli Combat Systems (ICS), I can tell you there are very specific reasons for not turning at the end of a punch (at least for Krav Maga and ICS). Krav Maga and ICS are meant to teach people quickly and effectively defend themselves in a street fight. Unlike a tournament or cage fight, anytime you get into a street fight, ...


2

Slightly behind either ear is the place to hit if you want a knockout. 43 years experience in martial arts, military and personal body guarding has proven this to me. As a former corrections officer, it is a statistical fact that knocking a person out rather than continuing to fight with them is a more humane way to end an altercation. The longer an ...


2

Another variation of this technique involves using a kick. From a southpaw stance, several low back leg kicks (left) can be thrown. Once opponent learns and moves their arms to block this kick, feint it but in the same move spring up and deliver a right right-hook kick, from the other leg/side. The plus of this one is that you can keep your arms free for ...


2

The answer is probably "it depends". Some examples: If you're employing the cross without preparation as the first technique in a combination it is most likely better not to telegraph your attack by "winding-up" a lot. If your cross is a follow-up on a technique on a jab/kick from the other side it is easier to conceal the wind-up in the previous ...


2

I see Dave Liepmann's already touched on what I want to say, which is that thinking about shoulders is a cart-before-the-horse mentality, and instead you should focus on your use of legs and how they're accelerating your hips, then how the torso drags the shoulders after the hips. Once you've mastered that to the point where you can pass a sizable ...


2

Regularly hammering the heavy bag with heavy gloves will compress and deform their padding, so they won't provide the expected protection (to your opponent), rendering them illegal to use in competition. Light gloves still give your skin some protection compared to being bare-knuckled - you can train a bit harder and longer. Can also help avoid repeatedly ...


1

Detached retina is a common boxing problem. It involves the retinal tissue at the back of the eye detaching - it can lead to permanent blindness. If you start to see flashes of light, or fuzzy eyesight, or "greyness" at the edges of your vision, you should see a doctor right away (within 24 hours). It is more prevalent if you are already short sighted ...


1

5 years of sparring / competitions, I would say that the likely hood of getting an injured nose is low, but it is still there. Most injuries i suffered on the head are basically on the jaw and side of the heads. *Ouch. The main thing to remember if you get injured in your nose is that if it bleeds for more than a day, please get an Xray as it might be ...


1

If you want to prevent a nose injury use headgear that protects your face . Here is an example http://store.titleboxing.com/facprottrain.html Otherwise, broken noses are common injuries to unprotected faces. Broken noses can affect your quality of life by affecting your appearance and breathing.


1

Since you know Muay Thai, you know you have a lot of close range weapons. There isn't a need for a close range body punch most of the time. Punches are more for medium-short to medium-long distance. Using your elbows and knees are for totally short distance right? And I'm sure you've heard that from your Muay Thai class or whoever you train with. I'm not an ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible