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6

This question about vertical-fist punching might help you. I'd say that keeping the fist vertical for a "jab or "cross" makes it an entirely different punch with a dubious connection to boxing or MMA. As for this specific situation, I think the salient point is that a fellow student of unknown expertise is giving you advice that contradicts your ...


6

There are no such things as "street fighting" martial arts. Each martial art has its own story for how it came to exist and how it has evolved over the years. Wing Chun kung-fu, for example, is often called a "street fighting" art, but it is nothing of the sort. The founder of that art had a specific purpose in mind for it, and that purpose was to allow ...


5

A - Elements of good punch Hit with your shoulder not hand (focus on the shoulder and not the peripherals). Hips turning in the direction of the attack Rear leg pushing hips in the direction of the attack (on ball of the foot) Position of front leg should be enough to hold you in place and not falling forwards or becoming stuck in place. As a general rule: ...


5

What is precision? There's a misconception about what it means to be precise, so to illustrate, let's examine two options: OPT1: A direct punch going straight out. OPT2: A punch that follows the target. If we attempt to strike a given moving target, it is the natural inclination to want to follow the target (OPT2) as we strike. This extends the length of ...


4

NullPointer, it's a parable and it's either (a) impossible or (b) just a case of the guy healing & the doctors being wrong. Just a parable; there is no single guy this is based on. I believe the lesson is a little less than what you state; that a positive attitude can help you overcome obstacles including healing, but not necessarily to do the ...


3

Yes, you have a high risk of getting your nose broken at some stage if you continue with Muay Thai. It isn't Tiddly Winks* - you will eventually get an injury, not just from landed punches but also from kicks. If you are at all attached to your nose (pun intended) the reconsider Muay Thai. Personally I've had my nose broken half a dozen times or more - the ...


3

As an instructor of Krav maga and Israeli Combat Systems (ICS), I can tell you there are very specific reasons for not turning at the end of a punch. Krav Maga and ICS are meant to teach people quickly and effectively defend themselves in a street fight. Unlike a tournament or cage fight, anytime you get into a street fight, your skills will deteriorate ...


3

I believe the story you are referring to in Zen In The Martial Arts is the chapter, "Confident Seeing" on page 109. The instructor was Sam Brodsky and he was doing a demonstration for his students in which he intended to break 9 one inch slabs of concrete with one punch of his fist. While only breaking 7 slabs he had pulverized many of the small bones in ...


3

As Jack Slack notes in his discussion of body punching in MMA, one of the most successful methods for setting up a punch to the body is forcing the opponent to shell up first: 0:04 Max Holloway uses a double left hook (or a lever punch) to keep his opponent's hands high before sneaking a palm down right hook in to the body (George Foreman style) and a ...


3

Knowing which MA you are studying is important in tailoring your precision techniques, as with anything else relating to a particular MA style. However this only becomes more crucial at the stage when you are already an advanced student in that discipline. Here is why: I guess you would agree that what you really mean is how to hit a target with precision. ...


3

We usually call this Sun Fist Punch. Basically it comes down to efficiency. While it is rare to find someone proficient at jabbing and vertical punching, but someone who is good at both will always have a faster vertical punch. Why it is efficient? The fact that you are relaxed and only tense your arms muscles at short intervals means you can go a lot ...


2

As an instructor of Krav maga and Israeli Combat Systems (ICS), I can tell you there are very specific reasons for not turning at the end of a punch (at least for Krav Maga and ICS). Krav Maga and ICS are meant to teach people quickly and effectively defend themselves in a street fight. Unlike a tournament or cage fight, anytime you get into a street fight, ...


2

You might have sleepy glutes. It's tough to say what's wrong or what will help without seeing the specific problem. But if your job is sedentary and you don't lift, I bet you have sleepy glutes and a weak back and legs, and fixing those would help. If you're not squatting and deadlifting, you need to start. Corrective exercises for posture, such as yoga, ...


2

Kick a heavy bag? do simple turning kicks at knee height, chest height and (when you can) head height on a heavy punch bag. Over time your flexibility will increase along with your power. If your hip movement is currently weak, you should find your strength increases quickly. I recommend leg raises and plank exercise (google them) as this will work your ...


2

When you punch to the body don't keep standing up; you need to change your level. Dip through your legs, like a small squat and duck down, like you would if you duck a punch. You don't just bend at the waist and lean over, you squat down. From there you can punch your regular punch. (i.e. a straight/hook) Your ideas for when to throw the bodyshots are ...


2

I'm not a boxer, I have almost zero boxing experience, but I've seen several valid approaches to footwork during the jab. The two I've been shown most commonly are a Jack Dempsey-style jab with a heavy forward step and a jab with no step, pivoting the front foot on the ball of the foot. I can't speak to the jabs you've seen or the examples you describe, but ...


2

Well depending on the Krav Maga school it may or not be right. As far as I know from attending some IKMF training the punch is not rotated but it is not perfectly vertical either. The way to do it as I have been told was the position the you get when you raise your arm straight in front of you in a natural position and clench the fist. Bas Rutten, a former ...


1

Since you know Muay Thai, you know you have a lot of close range weapons. There isn't a need for a close range body punch most of the time. Punches are more for medium-short to medium-long distance. Using your elbows and knees are for totally short distance right? And I'm sure you've heard that from your Muay Thai class or whoever you train with. I'm not an ...


1

A good time is when you are circling away from their power hand. Throw some jabs or combos at their head and move away from their power. Then once in a while circle in closer to them and throw a punch at their kidneys. If they are right handed, circle to their left, punch with your right keeping your left guard up. They might get a bad angle punch with their ...


1

Why punch when you can kick/knee? Body punch is basically used in MT to hit areas like the solar plexus or rib cage. These areas are very very painful when hit, but are a bit hard to hit with knee or kicks in short range. Elbows won't reach as well. The thing is it is crucial to keep one hand up to protect while hitting with the other. Sneaking in a shot ...


1

First of all make sure your technique is correct or otherwise you wouldn't be solving the root problem. Next you should some exercises to develop you muscles. You could try training with kettlebells, the swing for instance uses a hip hinge to power the motion. More info on the swing here: http://www.menshealth.com/fitness/eow-kettlebell-swing There are ...


1

Strike a punching bag. Also, do a regiment of core-strengthening exercises and stretches. Striking a punching bag will remove the hesitation one has when performing power kicks in empty space. You don't worry so much about hurting your knee during a snap or losing balance during a thrust or follow-through kick. It also naturally encourages you to apply more ...


1

A good start is to sit on a Swiss ball and move around on it much of the day. This will build up your core muscles, the fine muscles in your hips and, most importantly, loosen things up. Explosive power also comes from removing opposition. Seriously, you probably have many times the power you think you have but can't apply it. One of our advanced ...


1

For straight punches, i had my friend hold a pad and move it about. First circle it then move randomly, but smoothly and not too fast. This better trains your mind to continuously correct punch trajectory before the target is hit. Distance is important, if you are too close it is harder to determine the impact point, and if too far you go past the optimal ...


1

My punching training was really simple. I had two strikes: 1. Straight punch to the solar plexus 2. Uppercut to below the chin (going up and forward) I did these for ten years. I never worried about punching to the face, or to the bicep, or to various nerve clusters, or other weird targets. Then I met a friend who used a ton of targets I'd never thought ...


1

Vertical Punch Action Vertical punch is typically used in arts that tend to use a guard that uses a lot of cross parries with the palms - escrima, wing chun, etc. The movement efficiency is that all you need to do is close your hand and punch straight as less action. The more valuable aspect is about line of force with punches. The line of force for your ...


1

All the answers here come from karate guys and whatnot so here is a boxing/kickboxing answer: It doesn't matter if you rotate your fist or not, as long as you keep your wrist and arm straight and hit the target with your index and middle knuckles. Look on youtube how Bas Rutten punches. The advantage of vertical punches is sometimes they are straighter and ...


1

Yes push ups are good depending on the push up. The two i find to work are handstand pushups and pushups on your knuckles, with your hands by your hips instead of shoulders. Once you can manage to rapidly do a set of handstand pushups, you will have the shoulder strength to take someone of their feet with a cross or uppercut. Some explosive knuckle pushups ...


1

Some techniques and training do not stress the joints, others do. It depends on the martial art, the teacher and the kind of training. For example, a lot of judoka end up with bad knees. Likewise a lot of capoeira folks end up with back injuries. Joint damage can be understood in 3 factors: Too much stress, bad applied If you try to do too much force ...


1

The following answer is based on my personal experience and information I have gained in 10 year of martial arts practice. I hope it will be of use. As many other sports, martial arts also fall into the category of 'impact sports'. Indeed the joints are stressed not as much by practices such as shadow boxing but by striking hard surfaces as for instance ...



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