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7

Defending punches by putting a glove against your face is not a successful strategy without big gloves. With MMA's small gloves or without gloves at all, it is a Bad Idea. To be truthful, it's not an optimal strategy in boxing or kickboxing, either: you still take a substantial impact. Instead, work your rolling, bobbing and weaving, slipping, and parrying, ...


7

Heavyweight fighters are more susceptible to knock-outs. It's why heavyweight fights sell better than lightweight fights. Fans want to see a knock-out. Heavyweights generally hit harder than lightweights, because they have more muscle and more mass behind their punches than lightweight fighters do. When they're being punched at, heavyweights are slower to ...


6

National Geographic did a fight science segment on martial arts kicks, featuring karate, tae kwon do and muay thai against capoeira. I was a little disappointed, in that they had Simon Rhee (karate) doing a front kick. Just because of the angles, motion and muscle involvement you will never get a front kick that outperforms a round or side kick. (Especially ...


6

The fist should move as little as possible. The power of the uppercut comes from slightly dipping in the knees while turning the hip and then pushing from the hip. The elbow shouldn't move behind the body at all. The movement should look a little like the elbow is fixed at the hip and being pushed by the hip rotation/thrust. Only at the very end the arm ...


6

Fighting disciplines (such as Muay Thai, boxing etc.) Can cause multiple eye traumas. If your vision becomes blurry or if the pain doesn't go away you might want to consider consulting a physician. You can learn more on potential eye injury from blow to the head by reading these articles: Giovinazzo VJ, Yannuzzi LA, Sorenson JA, Delrowe DJ, Cambell EA. ...


5

I just love those self defence myths. First, unless you have trained punching people with keys in between your fingers, the result will be as much (if not more) damage to yourself as with the target. You may drop your keys as a result of the impact and pain which means that you lost your keys. Punch Injuries: Insights into Intentional Closed Fist Injuries ...


4

Your question is actually three parts: 1) How do I make a strong punch? 2) Where can I hit someone to have the best result? 3) How do I deal with multiple attackers? My answer to the first question is: Find a boxing gym and have them teach you how to punch hard without breaking your hand. Wrist strength is what you seem to think is the most important ...


3

There's basically two ways to use a normal set of keys for self defense. 1. Between the knuckles Held protruding between the knuckles you might be able to get a gouge on someone, particularly in the eyes, neck or cheek. The problem is that you have to hold it in such a way that the keys do not slide back into your hand while you're doing it, and it often ...


3

As it mentions in the comments, the idea is to have the keys protrude from within your fingers so that you can scratch someone. I personally would not do this. There are reasons for this: It takes a bit of time to setup. If I am attacked, it will probably be without warning, therefore I will not be able to get my keys between my fingers in time. If I ...


3

Another variation of this technique involves using a kick. From a southpaw stance, several low back leg kicks (left) can be thrown. Once opponent learns and moves their arms to block this kick, feint it but in the same move spring up and deliver a right right-hook kick, from the other leg/side. The plus of this one is that you can keep your arms free for ...


3

The feint is the major benefit behind it. The intent is to get your opponent to drop their guard from their head to defend against your kick so that you can land the punch. There's some benefit in the momentum involved in throwing your leg back while leaping forward, and when done right, you're reducing your target profile by coming in upper-body first, and ...


3

In my meager boxing experience, I've been taught to assiduously avoid cocking back before a strike. It telegraphs your intentions. The power that it provides would be better developed through better body mechanics in the hips and legs. However, if you throw a technique that loads you up towards the right rear, such as a right round kick or a left straight ...


3

Regularly hammering the heavy bag with heavy gloves will compress and deform their padding, so they won't provide the expected protection (to your opponent), rendering them illegal to use in competition. Light gloves still give your skin some protection compared to being bare-knuckled - you can train a bit harder and longer. Can also help avoid repeatedly ...


2

Lighter gloves are nicer. They're quicker, lighter, and easier to put on/off. Unfortunately, they're not that great prolonged striking, and not all that thickly padded.


2

I see Dave Liepmann's already touched on what I want to say, which is that thinking about shoulders is a cart-before-the-horse mentality, and instead you should focus on your use of legs and how they're accelerating your hips, then how the torso drags the shoulders after the hips. Once you've mastered that to the point where you can pass a sizable ...


2

The answer is probably "it depends". Some examples: If you're employing the cross without preparation as the first technique in a combination it is most likely better not to telegraph your attack by "winding-up" a lot. If your cross is a follow-up on a technique on a jab/kick from the other side it is easier to conceal the wind-up in the previous ...


2

Slightly behind either ear is the place to hit if you want a knockout. 43 years experience in martial arts, military and personal body guarding has proven this to me. As a former corrections officer, it is a statistical fact that knocking a person out rather than continuing to fight with them is a more humane way to end an altercation. The longer an ...


2

I'm not sure how you're scraping those knuckles; maybe make a tighter fist? Pull back straighter? Are you contacting the bag head-on or is your fist dragging? The easiest solution is the white tape used for bandages; throw a couple of loops around each knuckle. I did that when climbing (for support) and got it down to a few minutes. Bag gloves are a ...


2

If you're scraping those particular knuckles, probably a problem with your punch technique. You should be hitting straight on with your top two knuckles, and punching straight in and straight out. Scraping indicates dragging your fist on the heavy bag after the punch. This observation may be subject to stylistic differences, but I don't know any style ...


2

As you guessed, small gloves aren't ideal for passive blocking (keeping your hands in one position to block more than one punch). The closest thing to passive blocking you could get away with in MMA is to whip your forearm at your opponent's wrist in such a manner that your wrist impacts his. This isn't a strike though, the idea is the get your wrist to ...


1

I occasionally run into this issue myself. It happens because, even though you feel like you're using proper technique, your front knuckles are sliding(albeit less than millimeters) against the bag when you high punch. This can happen because your hand gets tired when training and it loosens the fist a little, letting your knuckle drag. When I find this ...


1

Frankly, any covering of your hands that doesn't slide around too much will work. Try a pair of light work gloves. If those are too hot, an ACE bandage or even just a bandanna wrapped around your hand will work. The latter two aren't appropriate if you're doing grappling work, but will do fine for punching a bag.


1

I have seen some horrific photos of injuries sustained from trying to put the keys between the knuckles where they slipped from impact. Try putting keys in your key and push them up against a hard surface. Notice that it doesn't take much pressure before they twist and start pushing into your flesh. Holding a key between thumb and forefinger is a bit better, ...


1

Detached retina is a common boxing problem. It involves the retinal tissue at the back of the eye detaching - it can lead to permanent blindness. If you start to see flashes of light, or fuzzy eyesight, or "greyness" at the edges of your vision, you should see a doctor right away (within 24 hours). It is more prevalent if you are already short sighted ...



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