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7

Defending punches by putting a glove against your face is not a successful strategy without big gloves. With MMA's small gloves or without gloves at all, it is a Bad Idea. To be truthful, it's not an optimal strategy in boxing or kickboxing, either: you still take a substantial impact. Instead, work your rolling, bobbing and weaving, slipping, and parrying, ...


7

Heavyweight fighters are more susceptible to knock-outs. It's why heavyweight fights sell better than lightweight fights. Fans want to see a knock-out. Heavyweights generally hit harder than lightweights, because they have more muscle and more mass behind their punches than lightweight fighters do. When they're being punched at, heavyweights are slower to ...


6

National Geographic did a fight science segment on martial arts kicks, featuring karate, tae kwon do and muay thai against capoeira. I was a little disappointed, in that they had Simon Rhee (karate) doing a front kick. Just because of the angles, motion and muscle involvement you will never get a front kick that outperforms a round or side kick. (Especially ...


6

The fist should move as little as possible. The power of the uppercut comes from slightly dipping in the knees while turning the hip and then pushing from the hip. The elbow shouldn't move behind the body at all. The movement should look a little like the elbow is fixed at the hip and being pushed by the hip rotation/thrust. Only at the very end the arm ...


4

I'm not sure how you're scraping those knuckles; maybe make a tighter fist? Pull back straighter? Are you contacting the bag head-on or is your fist dragging? The easiest solution is the white tape used for bandages; throw a couple of loops around each knuckle. I did that when climbing (for support) and got it down to a few minutes. Bag gloves are a ...


4

If you're scraping those particular knuckles, probably a problem with your punch technique. You should be hitting straight on with your top two knuckles, and punching straight in and straight out. Scraping indicates dragging your fist on the heavy bag after the punch. This observation may be subject to stylistic differences, but I don't know any style ...


4

It isn't ideal. I don't think you're going to get much out of it, because part of punching bag training is reacting to the return swing. Additionally, some of your force will be transferred through the bag into the wall, which could possibly damage the wall if it's dry-wall. Also, the bag will probably not be the right height to punch without having to ...


3

Regularly hammering the heavy bag with heavy gloves will compress and deform their padding, so they won't provide the expected protection (to your opponent), rendering them illegal to use in competition. Light gloves still give your skin some protection compared to being bare-knuckled - you can train a bit harder and longer. Can also help avoid repeatedly ...


3

I occasionally run into this issue myself. It happens because, even though you feel like you're using proper technique, your front knuckles are sliding(albeit less than millimeters) against the bag when you high punch. This can happen because your hand gets tired when training and it loosens the fist a little, letting your knuckle drag. When I find this ...


2

Frankly, any covering of your hands that doesn't slide around too much will work. Try a pair of light work gloves. If those are too hot, an ACE bandage or even just a bandanna wrapped around your hand will work. The latter two aren't appropriate if you're doing grappling work, but will do fine for punching a bag.


2

As you guessed, small gloves aren't ideal for passive blocking (keeping your hands in one position to block more than one punch). The closest thing to passive blocking you could get away with in MMA is to whip your forearm at your opponent's wrist in such a manner that your wrist impacts his. This isn't a strike though, the idea is the get your wrist to ...


2

Lighter gloves are nicer. They're quicker, lighter, and easier to put on/off. Unfortunately, they're not that great prolonged striking, and not all that thickly padded.


2

I have a couple suggestions for you on this issue: If you plan on using this for punches, kicks, knees, elbows, and possibly sword work I would suggest getting something like a kendo stick to do the sword work. Kendo Stick on Amazon This will help minimize any damage to the bag that would be caused by a bo staff or a dull sword but still give you the feel ...


1

My Sensi taught me years ago that you will fight the way you train and to build yourself up slowly. If your knuckles start bleeding, treat it like a hand injury in a fight and switch to throwing palm strikes without losing rhythm. Also, as others here have alluded to, after you build calluses on your knuckles this won't happen anymore. The way I did it ...


1

I had the same problem, which went away the more I punched with bare knuckles. My knuckles got slightly larger to the point that when I punch the wall like you did in your picture, my knuckles hit first. The skin on my middle joints became calloused. It did teach me the hard way what it felt like to punch with the wrong technique. It was a good lesson.


1

I would like to expand on The Wudang Kid's answer in that I found a stand on Amazon for about $100. Alternatively you could also pick up a BOB but those are significantly more expensive, around $270. Should you go the tree route as suggested above I would definitely suggest at minimum hand wraps and nomex gloves and definitely go lighter on the punches. Hope ...



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