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8

There are quite a few historic manuals linked from ARMA's page of manuals. The majority are pre-17th century, but there's a good dozen from that period. As to schools, my understanding is that practically every fencing master would claim his/her own style.


5

While the femoral artery is a potentially lethal target, Silver is not discounting that. There are artery's in the arms, and every place he mentions. He points out that a thrust may not do the damage one would expect from a cut. He's telling you to not rely on thrusts at all, but rather rely on cuts. As for avoiding the leg, Silver, all the Bolognese ...


4

The Hung brothers, Hung I-mien and Hong I-hsiang, differed on their expressions of baguazhang and xingyiquan. Both men had trained under the same teacher. Hung I-mien, being smaller and whipcord thin, picked up his feet. He tend to dance around in unpredictable directions and taught the forms that way to his students. Hung I-hsiang, on the other hand, was ...


4

IMVHO, reasons like "getting power from the ground" (or similar) are usually given by someone who either doesn't have a good explanation for the practice or does not want to tell you the real reason (either due to complexity or insufficient rank). Yes, there is a bio-mechanical advantage to be gained from correct leverage of the leg/foot against the ground, ...


3

Kondo Sensei (Tomiki Aikido, check wikipedia for his vitals) says that the reason we slide our feet rather than lifting them is that when you lift your feet you give up a bit of balance. I would rephrase this to say that you cannot lift your foot unless you have no weight on that foot; that means for that instant your balance is focused on the weight ...


2

From my experience with iaido, sliding the foot along the ground is actually just the first level of a more complex skill which involves expanding your energy forward from the hips (and sliding the legs back involves compressing your energy). The movement actually comes from the hip and is expressed in the foot. This changes rather drastically the power ...


2

As far as French manuals go, I know of only one from the late 16th century, entitled (deep breath): Traicté contenant les secrets du premier livre sur l'espee seule, mere de toutes armes, qui sont espée dague, cappe, targue, bouclier, rondelle, l’espée deux mains & deux espées, avec ses pourtraictures, ayans les armes au poing por se deffendre & ...


2

Every martial art has its own philosophy which influences what is emphasized. That philosophy is in turn influenced by: Terrain of the region it grew up in Available weapons (including strikes as weapons) The martial arts of the surrounding areas (i.e. common enemies) If the terrain is a loose gravel, or many unpredictable sink holes in the ground, ...


1

My understanding is that damage to the femoral artery (in each leg) would be very serious. Here's an ESPN story about a death from femoral artery damage, (albeit from a gunshot wound, so that's a pretty severe injury). My understanding is that severing either of the femoral arteries would cause and immediate drop in blood pressure that would cause the ...



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