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17

Yes, depending on your definitions of martial arts, inadequate, and real world. No, depending on your definitions of martial arts, inadequate, and real world. Surviving an attack (or combat) is all about stacking the deck in your favour: martial arts (arts of Mars, the God of War) do help, so do guns, team mates, artillery, the police, not being there, ...


10

Most likely, you haven't been careful of your situation and mindful of your surroundings, avoided dangerous places or people, and/or worked hard or smart enough to defuse and de-escalate situations of rising emotions, tensions, and territoriality (either your own or of those around you). Now, a lot of "you failed to do X!" discussions seem to assume ...


7

"Real Life Situations" There are too many variables encoded in this term for it to have any meaning. Is the big man stealing your car? Running you over with a car? Picking a fight at the bar because his wife left him and he's sad and drunk? Throwing one ill-conceived haymaker? The problem with such questions is that the premise of "highly trained and ...


7

@WayneInML is right... This is the "40 ninja in trees armed with automatic weapons and a nuclear device" question – you can always provide enough circumstances to counter an argument. The only sure-fire, 100% reliable way to survive is to not be there. Don't engage idiots, listen to that oh-so-obnoxious sub-conscious of yours that tells you walking down ...


6

Start meditating. You reacted (note: not "response" but "reaction") to a perceived aggression that, in truth, had nothing to do with you and everything to do with them. I don't quite know how far they were - if they spat ON you and not just AT you, then very close. However, you say they headed away from you right after the spitting. This means they did not ...


6

To be a little bit Zen: So, I'm in a fight. What have I failed to do? You've failed to end the fight. There could be nothing that you've failed to do. People are like animals, one day you can end up in a fight that you had nothing to do with. To absolutely remove all chances of having a fight you would have to live your life in a vastly different way, ...


6

I think it really just comes down to one thing. If you made a mistake, the mistake is that you were looking for a fight. It's an understandable tendency among martial artists, especially those that train for the "mean streets," after all; what's the point of training to fight and defend yourself in the mean streets if you don't ever actually use your ...


5

I fully agree with Sardathrion that there are almost always signs before actual violence, because violence is almost always an escalation. Even when there are no signs of the attack itself (i.e. a drive-by shooting), there is an history of violent escalation (insults, threats, etc.). As for the inadequacy of martial arts with the real world, I'd first say ...


4

It's absolutely fine and normal to feel agrieved at the insult that was yelled at you. I suspect your disappointment in your reaction is because you realise you were not in control of your action. Expressing doubts about their parentage is fine as long as it isn't a sudden reflexive action, effectively you are lashing out. Where you "failed" was you didn't ...


4

@stslavik's answer hit it on the money, but I wanted to give my two cents, alongside his. I know you didn't use these words, but basically, there's no real "anti-grappling" that isn't, truthfully, just grappling. I have a couple things that I'd like to recommend if you want to avoid being put in a grappling situation, though: 1) As @stslavik said, avoid ...


3

Good Luck If your not-getting-stabbed relies on your not-engaging-in-any-form-of-clinch, then I'd hire a combat medic to follow you around, because chances are you're going to have some stab wounds. We don't always get to choose where the fight goes. Our sprawl might fail, we might get caught by surprise, our knee or punch or debilitating nerve strike ...


2

All part of learning to come to terms with your monkey brain, and learning to recognize when it wants to play with the other monkeys in the area. Not easy, start always with you did here, self examination, become aware of what you did and how yo could have handled it differnetly. I would even suggest meditation type activities to learn to calm and relax ...


2

Ultimately, you get what you train for. Some martial arts training is not appropriate for a violent encounter, some is. It really depends on the training you do. Applicability Is your martial art teaching you archery? Are you likely to use a bow and arrow in a street encounter? Probably not. Is your martial art focused on guns, knives, clubs and ...


2

Just a shortie (declaimer: I am not very much into martial arts, unfortunately). Throw something at his face: knife, keys, wallet, jacket, stone. That is, I claim you always have some kind of weapon that changes your range. If you remain there, what do you win? You spend time fighting, he spends time fighting, but his friends are free to surround you. ...


1

Maybe you failed to do everything... maybe you failed to do nothing. Its one of those quotes that may make an old master seem wise in a movie, but its basically just a noble sentiment that falls apart on examination. Sure, perhaps you're out wandering in the wrong section of town... or didnt cross the street when you should have... or you're in the wrong ...


1

Sometimes you cross paths with a douchebag. The reason why martial arts and self-defense classes actually teach you how to hurt people, and not just how to run away, is because some situations are unavoidable. I have found that the more useless the martial arts school, the bigger the emphasis is on running away rather than fighting. That being said, the ...


1

Obviously the best answer is to not get into such a position. But, if you do, you've got a few options, depending how the attacker is trying to "grapple" with you, are they going for a thai style clinch? an wrestling over/under clinch? straight for a double leg? A couple options: If they are charging at you with some good momentum, you can use a ...


1

Kick him in the groin or knock him out! Or you could side-step and attack at the same time. But realistically you have to be fairly lucky to stop someone from closing in on you if they want to grapple with you. If you are lucky you'll get one or two shots in as he jumps you, if that doesn't take him out you'll have to start grappling to stop him from taking ...


1

As a boxer who went into mixed martial arts, I would say your best option once conflict is unavoidable is a simple stiff but uncommitted jab, and of course counter-take-down techniques such as a stiff arm or sprawl. In the end you will either be able to run after a jab and a shove, or in your scenario, you're dead.



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