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34

Go and have a look at all the clubs around where you live. Train once or watch a session. Then pick the one that has the best instructor, the more friendly students, and the one you had the most fun with. Style is second to whoever is teaching you, to whomever you train with, and to however much fun it is. All in equal measures.


15

A wrestler will say wrestling, a bjj player will say bjj, a muay thai fighter will say muay thai. But to be fair, they are all right. There isn't really one specific art that is better then the other for a base. I know, some people will argue with me for this, but if you look at the current state of mma, there are champions with a wide assortment of ...


13

Young male, not looking for anything specific, but I am a huge fan of MMA in general. You just answered your own question: try something that has already caught your interest. It's not at all hard to find a school in your area. Look some up and check them out.


13

A full blown martial art takes too long to master to help you for that specific situation. Also, in most traditional martial arts, the actual self-defense or "streetfight" part is small, if it exists at all. For example, the self-defense / streetfight classes in my Kung Fu school teach us the following options, to be considered in that order: avoid ...


10

This is going to be less about the specific martial art, and more about the instructor. The answers to this question are going to be relevant. Some of the big things to keep in mind when selecting a dojang for this sort of application: Do they emphasize operant conditioning? Does it train you to miss through light contact sparring? Probably not ideal. Do ...


9

Honestly, the best thing you can probably start with is not going to be a martial art at all. Instead, try the following: Strength Training One of the biggest culprits in back pain, knee pain, etc can actually be corrected by increasing the strength of the surrounding muscles. I had hip issues and years and years of martial arts did not fix my hip issues, ...


9

Aikido sounds like something you should check out. I would seek a ki-aikido school, if such existed where you lived based on your comment on "spiritual peace". Aikido generally relies on re-directing the attackers' momentum (and creating opportunity to do so) to either throw or pin. Technique is more important than strength and I have seen tiny females ...


8

All martial arts—if properly understood—can lead to "spiritual peace" (that's in quotes because in context, this would mean [the second half of] "calm"; but explaining that is a whole chapter of a book). Examples Ju Do "judo" (the gentle way). Understand its concepts and you need not exert any strength at all. Tai Chi: Understanding the forces of nature ...


7

Virtually all of the martial arts use the hands in some way. Even Taekwondo, which uses mostly kicks during sparring, will use the hands to block and punch. Whereas, grappling arts use the hands to grab onto the gi or wrists or whatever. It's not uncommon in Brazilian Jiujitsu or Judo to sprain your pinky and ring fingers due to the fact that your grip ...


6

Aikido is all about controlling someone without harming them. Aikido is basically ju-jitsu without strikes or kicks. The practice includes defense against bladed weapons and multiple attackers.


6

While bouncing I have used a single component of my skill set actively - clinch wrestling (or Greco-Roman if you will, but I only ever trained Freestyle). Every single altercation I handled by clinching, holding and talking to the trouble maker until they settled down. I kept other things in mind, and adjusted specifically how I did it to account for ...


6

I think that when something is a sport, you obviously can't learn all the things, as someone who is better at something and is competitive, she/he won't teach you the best techniques as you could use that against her/him at some competition. Your assumption is wrong. Plenty of coaches teach all the techniques of their style, either because they're ...


5

I'd say, none of the shows are by definition useful as a source of truth or any really useful information. They are mostly entertainment programs targeted at a specific audience of would-be martial arts enthusiasts. Do not get me wrong - martial arts shows are nice in the sense that they give general overview of what's out there, but I would not refer to ...


5

You say you are young. If you are still in middle or high school you should join the wrestling team. This will be free daily training, and you will have bi weekly competitions if not more often. So Once you can fight MMA legally (18 usually) you will have already had 100 or so competitions, which is a huge advantage when it comes to the adrenaline dump of ...


5

Aikido, judo and karate are all complementary arts: One (karate) focus on strikes, the others on avoidance, control of the opponent, and using body physiognomy to control/throw. Judo works from grapples and Aikido from a distance. As such, they are all good additions to each other. Whatever art you chose to do, remember to "empty your cup" before ...


5

Yes, power training will positively affect your grappling. It's important to understand how. All techniques require a degree of physicality. (Muscle is, after all, what moves your body in the first place.) Physicality includes strength (the ability to produce force), power (strength applied quickly), conditioning, and other attributes like balance, agility, ...


5

I've always considered non contact tournaments to be a lottery, but even in full contact matches you will get calls that go against you that you don't agree with - that is the nature of the sport. I would (politely!!) question the organisers and determine whether they have a review process for decisions. If they do then the referees/judges will have to ...


4

Aikido is not simply about locking and throwing, it also has striking (atemi waza). Aikido complements a lot of other arts; once you have practiced some of the Aikido techniques you will find it very beneficial to your karate blocks (uke), and you will find some of the same Aikido concepts buried within your karate bunkai.


4

"Verbal Judo" would be a good start, knowing how to talk down someone and de-escalte a situation is very helpful. After that I would tend to look towards something like JJ/Akido for joint locks and take downs. Add some striking art such as boxing or Krav Maga. Watch some videos on YouTube of actual confrontations in a bar. See what happens, how things ...


4

Systema. It is absolutely no-nonsense, focuses on acting without aggression, naturally, without sudden movements, and is ALL about practical experience. It will more-or-less-naturally start teaching things like the locks and movements that a bouncer is most likely going to need.


4

Personally, I've had classes in both traditional and more modern forms, and I have to recommend Muay Thai. At least in my experience it fits your requirements: Base - Muay Thai is more or less where most modern MMA fighters start. And in that sense it's a bit more practical than (for instance) kung fu. Ease to get into - Again this fits the bill. Get ...


4

This might make a few people here unhappy, but I would say look into Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) and other western martial arts systems. There are three kinds of SCA weapons combat categories. Heavy list/Weapons. This is the modern sport equivalent of medieval combat. It is fought with armor, either 1 on 1 (tourney) or group vs group (melee). ...


4

Take a martial art that is very 'realistic' to be spiritually self-fulfilled. The realization that many of the techniques that you learn gets used by people who put themselves in a cage to fight other people with these techniques, makes you realize that they have enormous confidence in their techniques, that they're teaching/sharing with you. Live sparring ...


4

I found Rory Miller's book on drills to be an excellent resource. A lot of realistic self defense exercises depend on a combination of figuring out safe practices vs. realistic stress testing. Regardless of the exercise, I find what is useful is setting up clear communication at the beginning of training - how hard are you supposed to go, what's off ...


4

As a competitor, it is not your place to criticise the judges' decisions. You should show proper decorum and fair play even if you know the decision is the wrong one. You can (and clearly in your case, should) bring it up with yours manager/team captain and ask why you did not win. If there is something not right, your manager or team captain or whoever is ...


3

You are probably correct about jiu-jitsu if you ever want to compete. Forrest Griffin makes a distinction between being a fighter and a martial artist in Got Fight. He seems to emphasize jiu-jitsu and grappling for success in being a professional MMA fighter. I've learned some karate, judo, boxing, hwa-rang-do, and most recently Aikido. I am most interested ...


3

Tai Chi. Any kind. Possibly even any teacher should do. TaiChi is neat, because of the general focus on smoothness. The movements must be carefully orchestrated and done not only with the minimum effort possible, but also with efforts to relax. The only way to relax fully, over time, is going to include fixing the posture, going as far down as the bones ...


3

A process cannot be understood by stopping it. Understanding must move with the flow of the process, must join it and flow with it. -- Dune, Frank Herbert I do not know of any books that do this, but you are better off watching Youtube videos, like this one, which describes heaven and earth. You're better off looking for 'heaven six' first, though. The key ...


3

There are various versions of the rubber jigsaw mats that are pretty good, I've trained on a number and have had them for home. They are not cheap cheap, but also not that expensive. But there are options, it gets more pricey the thicker you get them. Any thickness is pretty good for purely grappling. For throwing / takedowns then the thicker the ...


3

It really will depend on the art, and what types of weapons you would like to learn. For example, I currently take taekwondo, and we utilize the following weapons (Not all of which are traditionally Korean): 6' staff - mid and long range forms. Single and double bangh mang ee (escrima) single and double ssangh jeol bangh (nunchaku) ssangh nat (kama) jee ...



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