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12

First, men who know nothing about martial arts may see a woman leading the class and immediately think that they (the men) could beat up the female teacher. So they think there is no reason why the woman could teach them anything about fighting. Second, some men might not want to train with women at all (students or teachers), because it would be awkward ...


6

There's a good reason why an instructor pairs two students of unequal skill together. The student that is of lesser skill will begin to accelerate their knowledge when exposed to someone of greater skill. The student that is of greater skill, on the other hand, improves his/her knowledge of the art by being put in a position to explain things to the lesser ...


6

First things first, I think you should see a doctor that could give you a "go". A specialist could tell you if he thinks it would be safe for your knee if you restarted doing martial arts. If the doctor says no, you're putting yourself at risk if you restart. Let's face it, even if you feel your health is deteriorating, it is much better than with a ...


4

On the physical side: Knee ligament replacement surgeries are pretty good these days. You should see a doctor to see if that is an option. (You might want it anyway, even if you don't train hard, because you want to make sure you're not suffering meniscus wear as well...). The second person you want to see is a sports medicine specialist. They can let ...


4

Do not bother. A rank is just an internal thing specific to one particular organisation within a style within a martial art. They do not translate at all between styles nor can you compare them. Even within the same styles, what a "black belt" means can vary massively. Fundamentally, a black belt covers about 3cm of one's bum and cost about £5/$5/€5. You ...


4

Just focusing on the "How a woman can teach martial art for men?" aspect more than the "understanding why men might be uncomfortable" bit which has been well-covered in existing answers. Steve Weigand also shared some good ideas how to get guys in the door and stop them walking out before they've even got an impression of you as an instructor, if you do get ...


3

Im in the same situation. For the past 6 months I've been hitting the gym for 5-6 days a week. My schedule looks like this: Mo: chest/shoulders Tu: arms/back We: legs/cardio Tu: same as Mo Fr: same as Tu Sa: same as We Every Tuesday and Friday evening I go to Wing Chun, a lesson is 2 hours, the first 25 minutes are hardcore cardio. My goals are working on ...


3

It is very Subjective ! If you are medieval kind guy go for hema! Most of people use longsword but you also have rapiers(a lot of kinds out there as they were a very popular duel sword, also variations: rapier and buckler, rapier and dagger , rapier and cape), sword and buckler, dagger ( and shield or buckler) , big two handed sword ( you can't use them ...


3

Choy li fut Kung fu has 42 weapons. At my school you can request to learn a weapon of your choice. For instance a friend of mine asked to learn the double axes, so our Sifu learnt the form and taught it to him. I've already learnt the staff, double daggers, spear, two section staff, sabre and double ended spear after 5 years (obviously you need skill with ...


2

Unfortunately a lot of martial arts is sold on machoism. Men who build their self image on machoism don't feel they can learn "how to be a man" (as opposed to, say, their martial art), from a woman. They may not say it, they may not even be self aware enough to acknowledge that's what's driving them, but it's true for a lot of men. When you add in the ...


2

It depends on which form of kung-fu you're talking about. There are many, and each have their own set of skills they attempt to teach. If it's an internal form of kung-fu like Taiji, Hsing-I, or Bagua, no you can't do it without an instructor (yes, you can imitate the motions, but internal martial arts are about what you're doing that we can't see, so it's ...


2

What martial art should I try if I want to train with a wide variety of weapons? Probably the HEMA arts. Fiore de’i Liberi in "The Flower of Battle" for example covers everything from unarmed hand to hand combat through to mounted armoured combat and virtually everything in between. unarmed, dagger/knives, baton, swords (one and two handed), axe (...


2

Try this... "I thoroughly enjoy your teaching, and you are a great sifu. However, I am finding it difficult to further my learning with my current partner. I would like if I could work with an alternative partner, preferably one with similar experience as me." It's likely questions he may ask are those you already have answers to. But if the answer is ...


2

I imagine you're looking for the right teacher and motivation, and not so much the right martial art. I suggest going to a few local various MA gyms and checking out the physical intensity of their workout, and choosing the one with most sweat and partner-work involved. This will match with the boxing ethic and any martial art, which requires intensive ...


2

I believe the reason for his decision was well explained by Mr Weingard. However, I think you should just talk to him. Find time after a training and just tell him what your goals are and what you are expecting. Why should you treat a 'sifu' different then everybody else? Just think about that if you continue to train like that, you'll soon loose ...


1

In order to negate the pain being projected at you, sometimes others hurt themselves whether you like it or not. In real life, there's no such thing as self defense without inflicting damage to your opponent intentionally or not. Even if you are running away from a conflict, your assailant who is chasing you trips over and hurts themselves. oops.


1

The best art is the one you do not quit soon. This means, go and look at all the usual arts (probably filtered down to those you can actually train close to you, it's no use if you find a fancy art that is taught 100s of km away). If none of the martial art schools close to you trigger your interest, then I don't see an answer. And you can only decide that ...


1

Just start with boxing and go from there. If you an agile guy and/or just want to use your legs, try kickboxing as well. Muay-Thai involves a few more techniques + elbows; the rest just being kickboxing basically. (in my opinio) Don't go with any traditional martial arts because it will involve form and specific things/exercises that will sometimes take ...


1

Boxing is good for body shape, easy/quick to learn, and it is ok for self defense. You can practice your by yourself easily. Kick Boxing and/or Muay Thai are good for shape too, a little bit harder (slower) than boxing but they are easy/quick yet, better than boxing for self defense. You can still use your punching bag to practice. Other Martial arts are ...


1

I have taken martial arts classes in which a woman is the instructor. I'm male and honestly, I knew the woman instructor could knock me out in a fight and I accepted it! Lol... I have also sparred with women black belts and in class (point sparring) and have been decisively defeated by all of them i.e. 5-0! I was a green belt in my style. Make your class ...


1

Not all men feel awkward about having a female instructor. Those that do should take a serious look at themselves. "judge ones self instead of others" and all that. Our school is mixed. There are females that are younger than me, that are much higher grade. They are fellow students but sometimes get asked to take elements of the class. When they do, they ...


1

I can't think of any martial art I have studied which required me to do anything rougher than light-contact sparring with my instructor. Sex/gender shouldn't make one bit of difference when teaching technique. As long as the skills are there (both in the martial art and in effectively communicating/teaching said art), I don't think there should be an issue. ...


1

Well, as a student, I don't care about the gender of my instructor, just someone that really knows what they are doing and what they are saying. I think that some men believe that Martial Arts or Combat-Related/Self-Defense "stuff" can't be taught by a woman. It's just a mind matter, closed or open minded.


1

Most Karate schools will include some Okinawan Kobudo in their curriculum. Usually, this means learning a few Bo (staff) forms, but you can find schools in which the Kobudo is more widely integrated. From my experience in Shorinji-Ryu Karatedo, the following weapons were taught very regularly : Bo (6' Staff) Jo (4' Staff) Tanbo (~2' escrima stick) Dual ...



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