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10

Long answer short, no it shouldn't influence your choice. Your body can be shaped in any form you want, and even if you are heavy, light or middle weighted you have to learn how to use your body anyway to be succesfull in any martial art. Long answer: If you are looking among all the wide array of martial arts this can be a great question, take for example ...


9

There's a few things to navigate and untangle in your question, but the short answer is YES, there are martial arts out there that do this. Mostly it comes down to instructor rather than specific style, although obviously certain styles tend to be grouped around testing, you can find instructors who do not participate in that manner. Holding Back ...


7

I think that when something is a sport, you obviously can't learn all the things, as someone who is better at something and is competitive, she/he won't teach you the best techniques as you could use that against her/him at some competition. Your assumption is wrong. Plenty of coaches teach all the techniques of their style, either because they're ...


5

I've always considered non contact tournaments to be a lottery, but even in full contact matches you will get calls that go against you that you don't agree with - that is the nature of the sport. I would (politely!!) question the organisers and determine whether they have a review process for decisions. If they do then the referees/judges will have to ...


5

Should my body type influence my choice of martial art to learn? No. Your choice of martial art should be tailored to your preferences, subject to your physical abilities. Body type is only relevant if you're missing limbs, senses, or other capabilities that require special modification of a style. As for what people tall, short, wide, thin, ...


4

Quite surprised by all these big NOs. I would say: it depends. If competing and consequently having better chances at winning competitions are your goals, then your body type can definitely give you an edge. As common sense goes, grappling-based disciplines is more suited to stocky, strong people. There are notable exceptions: Paulo Miyao is a 64Kg bjj ...


4

As a competitor, it is not your place to criticise the judges' decisions. You should show proper decorum and fair play even if you know the decision is the wrong one. You can (and clearly in your case, should) bring it up with yours manager/team captain and ask why you did not win. If there is something not right, your manager or team captain or whoever is ...


3

If you are not happy with a judge's decision, you should take it up with the head official. The head official is usually not the senior judge. In my own organization, the head official was our Grand Master, while the head judges were instructors from various dojangs. Just take note of the fact that the head official is there to make sure the sport's image ...


3

There's one series I've been following - it's a Chinese series called Kung Fu Quest. You can find a few seasons on Youtube with English subtitles. Season 1 is more cheesy, after that it becomes quite good. The show has a rotating group of hosts - they usually pick 2-3 guys to study a particular art for few weeks or months - a decent amount of time to get ...


3

there are no "secret" in martials art. do you really think that when you reach black belt, some weird man will come at you, hidden in shadows, and teach you a more powerfull secret technique that will allow you to beat the best of the world ? we arent in a bad '60 kung-fu movie ... There are techniques that aren't shown to white belt because these are ...


3

IMHO, body-type should not be a 'primary factor' determining your choice of martial art. Since martial art is an 'art', most of them (not sure about all) can be adapted to reach a balance point between your body-type and the orthodoxies of the martial form. However, I would not say it outright that body-type has no effect. If you look at the traditional ...


2

The answer is No. Body type should not be a factor in choose a martial art. In fact, you should do some research on the different types of arts before you get serious. You can speak with the instructors and have a feel or a trial class, if it is offered by the instructor. There are many types of martial arts. Some are upright stand-up arts such as Karate ...


2

NO Your body has no influence in which martial art you like. Martial art is different of other sports. A people who training a Martial art has passion for that. I choose my martial art not for facility but for the challenge. What is your objective in Martial arts? Your body type just will make different for make big featured. It is really hard for a ...


2

You mention in the comments that you are trying to avoid a repeat. You may or may not be able to do that. Excepting the appeals process, all you can do is show up and compete to the best of your ability. One thing I have learned over 40+ years competing in various things (Including close to 30 in martial arts now) is that sometimes you will have your ...


2

So you're looking for a martial art that 1) has no exams, 2) is taught completely without holding anything back from the student, and 3) is not a sport. There are actually many martial arts teachers that teach this way, sure. My recommendation is to look around and meet with all the different instructors in your area. Ask them if they have tests, if they ...



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