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10

First, men who know nothing about martial arts may see a woman leading the class and immediately think that they (the men) could beat up the female teacher. So they think there is no reason why the woman could teach them anything about fighting. Second, some men might not want to train with women at all (students or teachers), because it would be awkward ...


10

Long answer short, no it shouldn't influence your choice. Your body can be shaped in any form you want, and even if you are heavy, light or middle weighted you have to learn how to use your body anyway to be succesfull in any martial art. Long answer: If you are looking among all the wide array of martial arts this can be a great question, take for example ...


5

Should my body type influence my choice of martial art to learn? No. Your choice of martial art should be tailored to your preferences, subject to your physical abilities. Body type is only relevant if you're missing limbs, senses, or other capabilities that require special modification of a style. As for what people tall, short, wide, thin, ...


5

First things first, I think you should see a doctor that could give you a "go". A specialist could tell you if he thinks it would be safe for your knee if you restarted doing martial arts. If the doctor says no, you're putting yourself at risk if you restart. Let's face it, even if you feel your health is deteriorating, it is much better than with a ...


4

Do not bother. A rank is just an internal thing specific to one particular organisation within a style within a martial art. They do not translate at all between styles nor can you compare them. Even within the same styles, what a "black belt" means can vary massively. Fundamentally, a black belt covers about 3cm of one's bum and cost about £5/$5/€5. You ...


4

Just focusing on the "How a woman can teach martial art for men?" aspect more than the "understanding why men might be uncomfortable" bit which has been well-covered in existing answers. Steve Weigand also shared some good ideas how to get guys in the door and stop them walking out before they've even got an impression of you as an instructor, if you do get ...


4

Quite surprised by all these big NOs. I would say: it depends. If competing and consequently having better chances at winning competitions are your goals, then your body type can definitely give you an edge. As common sense goes, grappling-based disciplines is more suited to stocky, strong people. There are notable exceptions: Paulo Miyao is a 64Kg bjj ...


3

IMHO, body-type should not be a 'primary factor' determining your choice of martial art. Since martial art is an 'art', most of them (not sure about all) can be adapted to reach a balance point between your body-type and the orthodoxies of the martial form. However, I would not say it outright that body-type has no effect. If you look at the traditional ...


3

On the physical side: Knee ligament replacement surgeries are pretty good these days. You should see a doctor to see if that is an option. (You might want it anyway, even if you don't train hard, because you want to make sure you're not suffering meniscus wear as well...). The second person you want to see is a sports medicine specialist. They can let ...


3

Im in the same situation. For the past 6 months I've been hitting the gym for 5-6 days a week. My schedule looks like this: Mo: chest/shoulders Tu: arms/back We: legs/cardio Tu: same as Mo Fr: same as Tu Sa: same as We Every Tuesday and Friday evening I go to Wing Chun, a lesson is 2 hours, the first 25 minutes are hardcore cardio. My goals are working on ...


2

Unfortunately a lot of martial arts is sold on machoism. Men who build their self image on machoism don't feel they can learn "how to be a man" (as opposed to, say, their martial art), from a woman. They may not say it, they may not even be self aware enough to acknowledge that's what's driving them, but it's true for a lot of men. When you add in the ...


2

It depends on which form of kung-fu you're talking about. There are many, and each have their own set of skills they attempt to teach. If it's an internal form of kung-fu like Taiji, Hsing-I, or Bagua, no you can't do it without an instructor (yes, you can imitate the motions, but internal martial arts are about what you're doing that we can't see, so it's ...


2

NO Your body has no influence in which martial art you like. Martial art is different of other sports. A people who training a Martial art has passion for that. I choose my martial art not for facility but for the challenge. What is your objective in Martial arts? Your body type just will make different for make big featured. It is really hard for a ...


2

The answer is No. Body type should not be a factor in choose a martial art. In fact, you should do some research on the different types of arts before you get serious. You can speak with the instructors and have a feel or a trial class, if it is offered by the instructor. There are many types of martial arts. Some are upright stand-up arts such as Karate ...



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