Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

As Trevoke said, there are no shortcuts, no fast-and-easy way to know you are relaxed. This is a very deep subject. Relaxing the body is much easier than relaxing the mind. There are biofeedback methods you can use to relax your body. Relaxing the mind gets into meditation. However, as long as your mind searches out for an objective -- or a shortcut like ...


7

Warm up with slow, high-precision, well-known moves You should warm up thoroughly, ending with light, smooth, slow movements that you've already mastered. From Tom Kurz' article, A Well-Run Workout: The Warm-Up: Warm-up regulates emotional states because the flow of impulses from working muscles (respective motor and sensory nerve centers, actually) ...


5

Excellent Question, @Jeroen. I have had the same problem for a long time. I am not a Wing Chun practitioner, but this has haunted me all my life throughout my Martial Arts study on all stand-up Martial Arts styles, but specially Aikido and BJJ. The interesting thing is that it was via Aikido and BJJ (and by that I mean, non-striking Martial Art) that I found ...


4

Practice when you are exhausted. When you are just too tiered to have tension, you will have none. After a while, your body will remember how to do it without tension -- since that is how you trained it. Note that this will not help you learn the movement and might be in fact counter productive to learning. However, once you know the move, it might be a ...


4

There is no "fast and simple technique to relax", except maybe a hypnose-induced trigger, and I expect it would have to be carefully composed. This is done like everything else - piecemeal. And when you get familiar with meditation, it becomes something you carry around with you. The other solution is to start paying a lot of attention to your body, so you ...


4

I've been practising both Wong Shun Leung and Mai Gei Wong Wing Chun, and I had the same problems as you in the beginning. In both of these styles, early training was focused on getting the bare basics right. For example, we'd do a drill where we'd apply pressure to our partner's technique (say wu sau for example), just to train being relaxed in that ...


3

To me this is most likely a mental problem not a physical one, so chiro and massage won't help (although they'll gladly accept your money for as long as you throw it at them). This also sounds like a teaching flaw - you've been told what the problem is but not how to fix it. I have a couple of suggestions: snap tecnique drills. Some karate techniques like ...


3

Interesting question... I didn't really give this enough thought before, so I'll relate it to martial arts by way of kobujutsu taisabaki to keep it on topic. Standing, and thus stance (kamae) in kobujutsu, is a vital aspect of proper positioning relative to the opponent. Asayama Ichiden-ryu, Masaki-ryu, Kukishin-ryu, Yagyu Shingan-ryu all stress the ...


2

Tension in traditional arts is present and in modern systems as well the cause is common in some aspects but different in others. The nature of human is that if you are subjected to stress, adrenaline, unknown, you will tense up. This is a survival mechanism. Frankly the survival mechanism that animals use now is "freezing" in hopes that the predator will ...


2

I wish you had specified your martial art of choice in the question. Stiffness and even more perceived (by others) stiffness can have many causes and it's difficult to help without more detail. On a general note, stiffness is usually the result of a bad body alignment, which is often (but not always) caused by a lack of strength. Strength training may help ...


2

I have had similar issues, although perhaps not as bad. What I generally do when I realize I am tensing up is slow down, focus on my breathing, and close my eyes. Generally I have to go through the motions on my own, as doing a technique on a partner without looking is difficult. Essentially just calm yourself down and focus on doing it in a relaxed manner, ...


1

As had been said repeatedly here, there are no shortcuts and practice and continual training in self awareness of your body are required. That said, a description that really helped me that has not yet been mentioned here, at least not in so many words, is to completely relax any and every muscle that is not needed for the current task. In martial arts ...


1

Exhale. Exhale deeply and allow the jaw to "drop" and loosen. Spend a second looking for the tension in your body and make an effort to relax it. (related link: http://copdcanada.ca/anxiety.htm That is the first link I found, not the best link I could find. Years ago when I was in management they taught a variety of techniques to link exhalation to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible