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12

In my experience as a male trainer and trainee the key for a hard, educational or maybe painful training is trust between all parts of the training group. Female fighters have told me that they were beaten up in training after they told their opponent to slow down. Afterwards they felt violently abused. So in such a case the trainer has the responsibility ...


8

But, when training, you can stop and breathe. But there's no time to breathe in a real fight. This difference does not have to exist. A coach should occasionally put students through sparring of some kind that the student should not take breaks in. That can take many forms, including hard rounds with someone else from the gym, or a smoker match-up with ...


7

Accidents happen. However, when you have an accident with people you are not really trying to hurt - you make extra effort to make sure the accident doesn't happen again - otherwise it is not an accident. If someone's ego at losing in sparring causes them to attempt to really injure someone, that is not a safe person to work with. Consider what you are ...


6

Hi have a trained a couple of ladies over the years and here is my take on it. For starters, there is a difference between training hard and just getting beat up. While I believe that is very important that you treat a women the same way you treat a man it is also important to not discourage a women from training. First - As a women you should be aware ...


5

Is this the logo of your club? ☺ On a more serious note, what you are describing is called bullying which is a form of abuse. Bullying should not be tolerated in any context whatsoever. So, what can you do? First, if you were knocked out: seek medical help as soon as possible. You might have more damage than just "seeing stars". Some might be ...


4

You can't reliably get good at things you don't practice. In a fight, we don't rise to the level of our expectations. Rather, we fall to the level of our training. Whether it's an eye-poke, strike to the carotid sinus, a chin-push osotogari, or some other dangerous technique, if you never train it against a resisting opponent (that is, in sparring), you ...


4

Great question. I suggest that many of the so-called "too dangerous" techniques are very low-yield in practice. In other words, you're not going to get as much bang for your buck from them as you will your more "meat and potatoes" techniques. Let's take the finger-tip eye gouge for example. This is distinct from shoving your thumb or finger into someone's ...


4

Walking on the sidewalk carries a risk of brain damage. Consider that before moving onward. Any contact sport--and many ostensibly non-contact sports--involves the possibility of an accident involving a clash of heads, a stray limb, or a slip and fall. But I wouldn't classify no-head-contact kickboxing as any more concussion-inducing than flag football, ...


3

You don't happen to go to Eric Kelly's Cherry Street boxing gym, do you? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syhb3z4pTFQ I'm kidding. But if you watch that video, I wonder if you might see some things in common with your gym experience. Coaches can be intimidating. They push you. Usually it's because they want you to step up your game and learn quickly, ...


3

In judo contests I have seen square steel tubing holding the mats together. Rigid, 5cm x 5cm steel tubes going around the tatami, tightened together by several tie-down-straps (ratchet strap is the correct name?) that go under the tatami. The whole package stays together just by gravity and the tension on the straps. The ratchets need to be covered though, ...


3

So, are there any viable (healthy) ways to simulate the body reactions to a punch landed to the face, intending to practice defense in such semiconscious state? I had heard a story that at least some Cuban amateur boxers will do somersaults as part of their pad workouts. The idea is that this will help you improve punch accuracy/precision when you are a ...


3

You master it by approximation: the more accurate the approximation, the better your odds are when you need it. Now mind you, that also means a great deal of the practice is your entry and positioning against a resisting opponent to deliver whatever is supposed to be your technique that's too dangerous for practice. That's the big pitfall most people fail ...


2

Talk to your instructor. Your instructor should pair you up with another woman with similar build/height, but if the situation does not permit such arrangement then your male partner should know better than to go full force on you. It might be good practice but if you don't learn anything and only getting injured, it is not going to do any good to you. ...


2

To echo more of what everyone else is saying: there is a fine line between abusive behaviour and hard training. My reading of your question is that your sparing partners have crossed it. Did they do that knowingly or by mistake I cannot tell. Some schools do go for a harder than rocks attitude that if you do not bleed, you are not training hard enough. Are ...


2

Quite frankly, it sounds like you're in an abusive training environment. The language you're using is uncomfortably similar to what I might hear from someone being beaten up by their spouse, the "they only hurt me badly when I'm doing things wrong" and making excuses for their behavior. It is possible that you're in a situation where you're literally out of ...


2

In grappling, I think slow wear of teeth is very rare. Problems are much more likely to be sudden impact, when someone hits you in the mouth, either intentionally or unintentionally. Using a mouthguard is common, though not popular. At any given practice, there are usually a handful of people with mouthguards. If you are worried about the wear on your ...


2

It depends of two things: How strong your teeth are If you have weak teeth it is possible you have a little of friction and waste of some of your tooth. How clean are your teeth It's possible you just had a little movement in your mouth and a little of bacterial plaque was removed. Or a little of dirt from between your teeth. I think this is the most ...


2

I'm rather short, 5'7" and the biggest issue that people have working with me is because of my low center of gravity, I'm very difficult to be thrown but I'm in a good position to throw people. So you'll find that you have to make changes to your game in order to compensate for the height difference. I'd also recommend that anyone you train with knows ...


2

Zebra mats has suggested layouts for 2m x 1m mats depending on the area you want to cover. It sounds like you are repeating layout A to cover your area. The problem with this is that when any mat is pushed (up, down, left, or right), only those mats directly in that line are affected. In layout B, for example, a push will be distributed among more mats. ...


1

Is there any reason to believe that Ingle's fighters do better than average in avoiding serious, lasting damage from injuries in the ring? I wouldn't say so. The "hit and get hit" isn't a mantra that is NOT widely taught in boxing. Everybody aims to do this, just in different ways. Some are, obviously, better at it than others though. The style of f.e. ...


1

Sounds to me like you should find a different club. Unless you want to train to be a bully. In a year or two, maybe you will be asked to beat up the new kid. Will you do it?


1

There's no interlocking with a quad cube layout. Try laying in a herringbone pattern instead, see if it helps. This is why the 40mm jigsaw mats have become so popular, I don't remember how we laid out the old ones but do remember similar problems.


1

I've trained in many martial arts schools. There have always been one or two individuals that didn't know their own strength or who simply had some kind of mental issue that caused them to scare everyone else in the class who had the misfortune of partnering up with them. And I'm not even talking about sparring. It could be a nice, smooth, flowing, ...


1

Brain damage can be caused by a lot of things but the main causes are drugs and concussion/compression (usually from boxing or similar sports). If you suffer a compression or concussion, you will have brain damage as a result to some extent. The more times you become concussed and the more serious the hit (to the head), the more serious the brain damage ...


1

First of all. Although this question already has many answers basically re-iterating the same, please let me repeat that there is a fine line between training hard in martial arts and abusive behavior, and at least on the surface of it, it seems like what you are enduring tends towards the latter. However, there is always (at least) two sides to any story. ...


1

Your classmates should not be deliberately hurting you during a class. There is a place for hard training, so you know what it feels like, but it should only ever happen once the proper technique has been learned. The behaviours you describe (leg sweeping, joint locks, etc.) strongly suggest that the men you are training with do not understand how to help ...



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