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14

Interesting... Assumptions Consider for a moment the "Chainsaw-Wielding Killer" of your apparent nightmares. Assume, for a moment, a weight of approximately 8.3 lbs. (Roughly 7.4 lbs. for a lightweight chainsaw, another .9 lbs. for fuel, using the Stihl MS 192 C-E as a guide) – roughly twice the weight of a european bastard sword. Said killer could: ...


12

There's this art form called Running. It defends against almost any handheld, especially heavy, melee weaponry. How to defend using Running Observe position of chainsaw and its wielder. Distance yourself out of arms (+ chainsaw) reach: this should be some six to eight feet. Turn away from the chainsaw. Engage feet and quads in Running. Do not stop until ...


7

Interesting. There are a lot of assumptions here. Let's cover the assumptions that you're making about the attackers first: A1Q - You seem to be indicating he's the lookout, as well as a fill in. His position would indicate that, if you're cornered, he's also closest to a wall. A2L - Being loud, barking orders, etc. is not indicative of a leader ...


7

[Nota Bene: A lot of this is going to piss off a lot of you. I am most certainly NOT blaming any victims by saying any of this; I'm proposing a better way to prepare people for the harsh reality that certain people are just not nice.] What Is Rape? I wasn't going to answer this question. I like Sardathrion's comment that "Whatever you think you know about ...


7

I note your question is tagged with just self-defence - what I explain here can be applied whether you are practicing an established martial art or just a bunch of self defence type moves. There is an exercise in a number of Japanese arts (karate, ninjutsu, aikido and more) called Tai Sabaki. It involves doing the same repeated sequence of moves (whatever ...


6

There's a few things here that I want to address: I did start thinking about owning a gun and getting a license to carry a concealed weapon after that I feel for you; no one should have to go through what you went through. Let me say this first off: I am 100% for responsible firearms ownership. That said, many people become victims of crimes and ...


6

It's a somewhat contrived question, but I will answer as if it wasn't. a chainsaw (even a smaller one) has a reasonable weight, if you cannot out sprint the attacker then you clearly need to do some work on your fitness (note I'm excluding the fact you might be injured (maybe chainsaw guy already removed one of your legs?!!)). a chainsaw is similar to any ...


5

Mu shin, mu gamae which means no mind, no posture. You have to rely on your training that if something happens, your body will react before your brain can make a conscious decision to do something. This is why we do sparing and drills: to train to react instead of consciously forcing an action. However, my best advise would be: do not worry about it. ...


5

First, the teacher should understand that if they're teaching even a moderately sized class, the odds are overwhelming that someone has experienced a violent sexual assault. If not them, then someone they are close with. Even overlooking the fact that those memories are painful, consider this when saying that such-and-such technique will work to prevent ...


5

You've taken the first step in doing so - acknowledging that you're doing it. Now, where do you go from there? That largely depends on the situation, but here's a few things that might help to get you started. Learn to roll. You've been put in an arm bar, or you've been thrown, or basically any other situation that if it follows through to its natural ...


5

The FBI compiles some data but not as fine-grained as you want. Beyond that I think you're SOL other than looking at guesses. My favorite such nonscientific approach is the "HAPV" (Habitual Acts of Physical Violence) idea formulated by Patrick McCarthy. He seems to describe things accurately in my judgment. That is to say, he alleges that the most common ...


4

There are two things to keep in mind regarding headlocks. First, most "headlocks" aren't actually controlling the head, or don't just control the head. They're usually controlling one or more shoulders and other limbs at the same time. Second, they're almost always not the end, but are instead used as a transition to a more dominant position (except maybe ...


3

So, there's two useful habits I've developed towards dealing with those situations. Shifty Eyes Your peripheral vision is actually really good at detecting motion. The useful factor in this is that when you are walking in a sketchy area, you can simply practice scanning back and forth in a way as if you had just noticed something. When someone is looking ...


3

Interesting. My answer is going to be a bit all over the place, but stick with it, because the question you're asking isn't the issue you need to address. Why Everyone is a Potential Threat The issue with potential threats is recognizing a threat and not fabricating a worry. When martial artists begin training, we're thrown into a situation where, for a ...


3

For any kind of a weapon like this, whether it is a sword, staff, knife, chainsaw, axe, you name it, you want to be one of two places: Outside its range - Obviously if you are outside the range of the weapon + the wielders reach, then they can't hit you with it (Short of throwing it). Being outside the reach of the weapon also gives you the opportunity to ...


3

I'm in the "Why bother?" camp. I think such a conversation is largely pointless. It's got that feel of the old esoteric style of martial arts where awareness allows one to predict how the universe unfolds, and yes, there are many things you can predict, but I don't think its something you are going to teach to people, and I'm not entirely sure its going to ...


3

The general goal of not turning belly-down in judo competition is not enough. You need to develop specific, actionable goals to work on in newaza randori (and even, perhaps, with proper etiquette, to set up in tachiwaza randori) and to try out in shiai. Judo groundwork, in my view, is composed of several broad strokes: Rapidly applied chokes, which ...


3

You need to do something like Wrestling, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu or Judo. These arts are great for taking a persons force and using against them. Ignore all these stupid wing-chun kung fu type of martial arts. I've trained in wrestling, BJJ and Judo against guys who are smaller than me (I'm 6ft2 92KG) and had my ass kicked by guys who have great technique ...


2

Ultimately, you get what you train for. Some martial arts training is not appropriate for a violent encounter, some is. It really depends on the training you do. Applicability Is your martial art teaching you archery? Are you likely to use a bow and arrow in a street encounter? Probably not. Is your martial art focused on guns, knives, clubs and ...


2

I like the answers from all of the posters here. As a side note, I find it pretty interesting that the kubotan is not considered to be a weapon in Germany because I live in Canada and when I was visiting an amusement park, I had to remove my keys because the kubotan was not allowed in. The kubotan is certainly a weapon; however, anything can be used as a ...


2

A brick to the head is a great counter to a chainsaw. Or to anything, come to think of it. Update: Since I am forced to give more than one line answers, let me explain: a brick can be thrown. It is hard and heavy and can crush the skull of the chainsaw wielder. If your skull is crushed, you will die. If you are dead, you can't attack people with chainsaws ...


2

If we were sitting in a pub together and having a beer, my answer to your question would be "Why bother?". Of course there is more to the answer than just those two words. I understand and respect what you are trying to achieve by posing the question and trying to answer it. However I think you are trying to achieve the impossible. Your relationship to ...


2

Use science! First and foremost, one needs to understand something before one can demonstrate it. Chances are that everything you know about conflict is wrong or misleading. So, do some research first: What is crime like in your area? What does it involve? What are the common crimes and the uncommon ones? This is all statistics basically. You should be ...


2

Question is a bit old, but this is my input as a fighter who never did any ground work in competition. I Never liked it and never used it. I've always fight standing, and if my oponent went on the ground, I didn't even bother going on him for 10-15 seconds, I just stand up. Things you need to learn though if you fight like this : A- get up FAST. If ...


2

Loaded question. Depends on many factors. A) Do you have the option of running (and do you think you could outrun him)? If so, do. B) Is he within kicking range (and are you a strong and accurate kicker?) A kick to a vital area (groin, ribs, solar plexus if you can reach) would be well worth your trouble. This has the added advantage of stopping him ...


2

If you are looking for tips on how to be safe, then I am a big fan of Mark "Animal" MacYoung's No Nonsense Self Defence. It has a lot of good advice on self defence form prevention to running to safety to decreasing the risk of getting attacked. Also, the site highlights a lot of myths and rubbish which is branded as self defence. If on the other hand, you ...


1

I understand your feelings on this matter. As a female martial artist, I have learned that even though I am well-adept, I am still small, and many will inevitably view me as a target. I had a friend who jokingly called me a Poodle; even though a Poodle may bite just as nastily as a German Shepherd, most people don't take them seriously because they don't ...


1

I remember someone asked Chuck Norris how to fight a person who has a knife, he said if you get into a knife fight you are going to get stabbed. I'd say the same applies with just about anything; if you get into a fist fight with someone who is a really bad fighter, chances are they will still land a few. So if running is not an option, you need to do your ...


1

Most of the answers I have seen involve getting out of range, but a chainsaw (or almost any two-handed weapon) would be most effective at a distance. I suggest closing while avoiding the blade (not an easy task, I know) and grabbing the engine area. Using a diving roll to get behind the attacker would also position you in such a way that the weapon would be ...


1

I have to agree with most of the people here, get defensive, get distance between you and the attacker and run away. Man without chain saw likely to run faster than man with chainsaw. If you have loose items around throw them at the attacker to create opportunities for running away. Obviously if you do want to fight (can't escape), firstly you need to keep ...



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