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12

Primary and secondary grappling skills Wristlocks and most other standing joint locks are almost always secondary grappling skills: one must already be able to dominate using basic gross-movement wrestling skills like pummeling, grip/hand fighting, foot-sweeps, hip throws, body locks, and so on. Part of the problem is strength: standing wristlocks and ...


12

You are probably missing kuzushi (balance breaking) and/or atemi (strikes). Both serve the same purpose: to distract your opponent so that they worry about something else rather than their wrist. Then, applying a wrist lock becomes easy (read: easier). The ninth technique of the goshin-no-kata shows just what I mean: you have a lapel grab which is ...


10

Running seems like it is the thing for you: You can start now and improve your techniques by going to the gym to find a trainer, going to a run club, and reading books and magazines on running. You can also get a whistle and blow it (while running to a safe place) to attract attention to your predicament. Martial arts take long time to learn. Self defence ...


9

First, let me begin with "What do you mean by effective?" In this case, there is enough context that I think I know, but it can matter a lot. Very few martial arts are truly ineffective, but all of them are products of their environments and the needs of their founders. Muay Thai is brutal, and thus probably not the best choice for someone that needs to ...


9

First off, consider therapy. I know that it's not exactly martial arts advice, but it sounds like you've undergone a great deal of trauma and frankly, us just giving you training advice would be like giving cadence tips to a runner with a broken leg. You have been damaged and you need a qualified medical professional to help you with that damage. Past that, ...


8

Is there a way to escape/ defend yourself from tornado kick? Ummm... yes. If there wasn't, all martial arts would only practice tornado kicks, but in fact relatively few martial arts use the technique. Those kicks are horribly telegraphed, which means the defender have a lot of warning and time to decide what to do to defend or counter-attack. They're ...


8

There is no "ultimate method" in a street fight. Ground grappling is really good if you end up in a one on one fight, on the ground, with no weapons involved. Fights tend to go to the ground because people have bad balance, it's relatively easy to trip or get knocked over something, and the tackle/bum rush doesn't require a lot of skill to use. ...


8

Unfortunately, some martial arts as practiced in the training hall are unsuitable for general use in street fights. The danger with high kicks is not just the surface as mentioned by cs1971, there are other factors too: high kicks are slower (they have further to travel) you are more vulnerable during the delivery and retraction stages of the kick ...


7

In general you will do a lot of things in training that may not be directly applicable in a fight. This does not mean that they are not helpful. For example: what is the likely practical fighting application of a press up? This can also extend to Stances - some stances are designed to work your leg muscles and increase your balance. My experience comes ...


7

You have two requests here. First, you can learn to defend yourself against an average person relatively quickly - just as much as you can learn basic first aid, relatively quickly. Whether it will be enough or not really depends on the luck of the draw of the situation you face. Going to train once or twice a week, for a few months, in a school aimed ...


6

You can only try to shorten the distance to the attacker as soon and quick as possible as the chair, baseball bat or any other object he is potentially throwing has the strongest impact on the end of the motion or object. By that I mean, that the stick/bat/chair will be moving fastest at the point furthest from the attackers arm (the hit will be strongest ...


6

The setup for one of these kicks is ridiculous, and I question if there is even a significant power difference between one and a well delivered roundhouse or side kick. I feel good footwork is the best defense, since anything except a stationary target is going to foil the effectiveness of execution. I'm a big, aggressive fighter, and I always step inside ...


6

Ranging in self defense is actually very different than sparring or competition fighting. Start with this: what range are you at when you realize you're being attacked? (and don't have an option to get away?) Are you 20 feet away, with them running and yelling at you? Did someone tackle you from behind and you're on the ground? See, the first problem is ...


6

Basic headlock release: 1) twist your body to get the front of your neck at the gap (if your throat is being closed by the arm this is top priority). 2) With the arm that is closest to the attacker - do a front crawl motion (bring the arm between you and the attacker low to get the arm behind you both). 3) Bring the arm up and between yours and the ...


5

WTF stylists can do a few things to improve their self-defense capabilities. Get those hands up! WTF tends to focus so much on kicking that they forget they have hands. Hence, they stop protecting their heads. Practice non-point sparring. That is, stop your opponent with the power of your technique rather than stopping the match on touch. Continue ...


5

In the case of sankyo (or tenkai kote hineri), the most common way to escape the technique is to drop one's elbow. Of course, a well executed tenkai kote hineri prevents that from happening. Any kote hineri (rotational wrist lock) or kote gaeshi (supinating wrist lock) can be escaped with a judicious punch aimed at Tori's nose or to be fair, any body parts. ...


5

Is it generally expected in martial arts systems that all training stances/positions (horse stances, front stances, drop stances, etc.) will have direct fighting applications? Generally expected... No. In reality. Yes. All stances have fighting applications. All movements in kata or forms have direct fighting applications. They may not be immediately ...


5

This is going to vary from individual to individual. What is going to matter most is one's training and comfort level. I don't advocate throwing a spinning jump kick when your life is on the line, but if you are a taekwondoin and you are really comfortable with busting out a roundhouse kick to your assailant's brainpan, then by all means do so. I have ...


5

A lot depends on the exact circumstances of the situation. How unevenly matched are the combatants in size and strength? What are the stakes (pain, humiliation, injury, death)? What are you prepared to do to remedy the situation? Some things are pretty straight forward. Make certain your airway and blood-flow is clear. If they aren't, you can thrash and ...


4

Stop pretending you're learning substantial skills by practicing alone. Without a partner to give live feedback and skilled resistance, and without a knowledgeable coach to correct mistakes, you're just engaging in martial masturbation. You'll ingrain bad habits that you'll have to unlearn later. Focus on becoming the most athletic version of yourself ...


4

If they just want your belongings, give it to them, and good, you're done. Your friend is unhurt, so your friend did the right thing. The question people need to focus on is "What will make me safer?" and your friend did the thing that got him out safely. If they want your life, you're going to have to a) figure that out in time, b) figure out what you'...


4

Holds like sankyo rely on crossed extensor reflex action - the sensation of pain causes reflexive activity in other parts of the body. This is most effective when the opposing side of the body has nothing to leverage against, i.e. no wall or floor to push against. This means you can continuously adjust or tweak the hold to prevent the opponent punching or ...


4

A motorcycle driver in protective gear is similar to an armored opponent. Striking the opponent may not be effective, but you can still use grappling techniques. This striking constraint makes the situation like that in wrestling, judo, or jujutsu; except you are constrained by circumstances and not competition rules. You can still throw them, use other ...


4

One possible use for a high kick is intimidation. A high kick delivered cleanly is impressive-looking, and may convince other attackers to back off. That said, I'd only recommend it if you're really certain of your ability to pull it off, and to recover if it doesn't come off cleanly. Of course, there is another purpose to training high kicks, namely ...


4

It's a bit of a dirty secret really - most people who teach self defence classes know that what they're teaching will be mostly ineffective due to: the deer-in-the-headlights syndrome that you mentioned 99% of those students are not going to actively practice what they were just taught therefore if they ever manage to apply it effectively it will be ...


3

Any art where you train vigorously and practice applying your techniques against a moving, unpredictable, uncooperative partner will develop self-defense skills and attributes. Judo, BJJ, boxing, kickboxing, SAMBO, MMA, and other arts are all reliable styles for finding that kind of training. The goal is to regularly practice sparring in class in order to ...


3

What you should be learning First, I'll point out factors you want in any training aimed primarily at self defense. This is because there are schools, programs, workshops, etc. that claim to be about self defense and don't cover these things, and there are schools for sports martial arts or traditional/cultural martial arts that DO, and this is really the ...


3

You're a female, and you're mostly interested in self-defense. Presumably this is because you just want to be able to defend yourself in common real-life situations women might find themselves in. And you're worried that the class you enroll in will only teach things that are useful for much taller men. Briefly, my recommendation for you is to look at ...


3

Whatever you do in Aikido, the simple rule of thumb applies: never play fair! If your and your opponent's hands are similarly strong and you're performing your lock single-handed, than you have a very slight chance to prevail. In order to achieve the goal of your lock you have to: use both hands against the one of the opponent use your legs and body ...


3

I also train in TKD and though we don't train for grappling (locks, chokes, etc.) very often, we are told that against a stronger opponent, you may need to do something else to weaken their grip. (As Sardathrion explains in his answer). The weapon of choice is a kick or strike to the groin! You may find that there is a small but vital aspect of the lock ...



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