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12

You are probably missing kuzushi (balance breaking) and/or atemi (strikes). Both serve the same purpose: to distract your opponent so that they worry about something else rather than their wrist. Then, applying a wrist lock becomes easy (read: easier). The ninth technique of the goshin-no-kata shows just what I mean: you have a lapel grab which is ...


12

Primary and secondary grappling skills Wristlocks and most other standing joint locks are almost always secondary grappling skills: one must already be able to dominate using basic gross-movement wrestling skills like pummeling, grip/hand fighting, foot-sweeps, hip throws, body locks, and so on. Part of the problem is strength: standing wristlocks and ...


9

In a case where you have to face more than one opponent, in a case where putting someone into submission is not enough to end the fight: If you're more comfortable with the idea of using submissions, then you can train for that: arts/skills such as Chin-Na, some schools of jujitsu, hapkido, aikido... all teach joint locks that let you control one ...


9

First, let me begin with "What do you mean by effective?" In this case, there is enough context that I think I know, but it can matter a lot. Very few martial arts are truly ineffective, but all of them are products of their environments and the needs of their founders. Muay Thai is brutal, and thus probably not the best choice for someone that needs to ...


7

There's two goals here, and they don't necessarily overlap. Less harmful techniques The techniques less likely to result in serious injury or death for your opponent(s) are to restrain them. Unfortunately, restraining them requires tying up part of your body to do so - limiting your mobility and your ability to defend yourself against others. These ...


6

First off, consider therapy. I know that it's not exactly martial arts advice, but it sounds like you've undergone a great deal of trauma and frankly, us just giving you training advice would be like giving cadence tips to a runner with a broken leg. You have been damaged and you need a qualified medical professional to help you with that damage. Past that, ...


5

I would turn this question around and ask: How do people get standing arm-bars and joint locks on the arms of their opponents? Understanding how they do that will give you a good idea about how to defend against it. Generally, in order to perform a standing arm-bar or a grapple of some sort on the arm (like a wrist grab and twist), you can break it down ...


5

WTF stylists can do a few things to improve their self-defense capabilities. Get those hands up! WTF tends to focus so much on kicking that they forget they have hands. Hence, they stop protecting their heads. Practice non-point sparring. That is, stop your opponent with the power of your technique rather than stopping the match on touch. Continue ...


4

Stop pretending you're learning substantial skills by practicing alone. Without a partner to give live feedback and skilled resistance, and without a knowledgeable coach to correct mistakes, you're just engaging in martial masturbation. You'll ingrain bad habits that you'll have to unlearn later. Focus on becoming the most athletic version of yourself ...


4

I teach Kyokushin karate and I've taught the many different ways a roundhouse kick can be executed. However these can be boiled by 2 different characteristics: the striking area (i.e. Ball of feet, instep and lower shin) and the power mechanics. With power mechanics there are 3 distinct forms: 1st the TKD style where the leg is brought up vertically like ...


4

The most recent reference I've found, from 2007, indicates that tinted sunglasses may indeed block the effect, although it seems like the disorientation effect may still be effective.


3

I think either you or your self-defense instructor are misunderstanding something. If your instructor thinks it's too dangerous to take more than one class with him because of the possibility that you might learn something and try to use it for real, then it's the same as him saying that you should not learn anything from his classes. What kind of a teacher ...


3

It would largely depend on the chainsaw. What most people seem to forget is that a chainsaw is a tool designed to either cut an immobile target(trees) or light targets(shrubbery). A regular chainsaw is not expected to block anything, cut through everything or cut indefinitely. thus striking the saw likely destroys or deforms the rail (or at least ...


3

I also train in TKD and though we don't train for grappling (locks, chokes, etc.) very often, we are told that against a stronger opponent, you may need to do something else to weaken their grip. (As Sardathrion explains in his answer). The weapon of choice is a kick or strike to the groin! You may find that there is a small but vital aspect of the lock ...


3

You're a female, and you're mostly interested in self-defense. Presumably this is because you just want to be able to defend yourself in common real-life situations women might find themselves in. And you're worried that the class you enroll in will only teach things that are useful for much taller men. Briefly, my recommendation for you is to look at ...


3

What you should be learning First, I'll point out factors you want in any training aimed primarily at self defense. This is because there are schools, programs, workshops, etc. that claim to be about self defense and don't cover these things, and there are schools for sports martial arts or traditional/cultural martial arts that DO, and this is really the ...


3

Any art where you train vigorously and practice applying your techniques against a moving, unpredictable, uncooperative partner will develop self-defense skills and attributes. Judo, BJJ, boxing, kickboxing, SAMBO, MMA, and other arts are all reliable styles for finding that kind of training. The goal is to regularly practice sparring in class in order to ...


2

I'd like to address the "how to evaluate a school" part of the question from personal experience. Brief context: I fenced foil in my teens, did aikido and wing chun in my 20s. I got osteoarthritis in my knees at age 35 (Dad blamed my dancing, I blamed all the kneeling from Catholic school). For years I couldn't walk without a stick; I even changed ...


2

Below is a link pertaining to a 3 month white belt who used Kotagaeshi to defend himself. It goes with the adage that self defence is 80% confidence. Basically a lot of things will work from a lot of martial arts, it's having the presence of mind at the time when your adrenaline is pumping that counts in that context. It has controls, pins and throws, ...


2

Most of the techniques in aikido are based on creating an opening for you to manipulate/control your opponent through the use of leverage and/or pain. In order to do that you are going to have to get within arms reach of your opponent or literally toe to toe in some cases :). Aikido really shines when you can create that opening and use one of techniques ...


2

Personally I've never been concerned for the opponents live. Remember they are the one attacking you! I say that with tongue in cheek. Because as you know you should be doing everything in your power to defuse or remove yourself from the situation. Now if you are find yourself within a fight use enough force as you feel is needed to protect yourself. I know ...


2

The actual way to win a street fight with minimum injuries is to not fight at all. In fact, if you are faced with a choice or situation that would put you on the spot for a brawl, the first thing that you should always do is to flee or negotiate with words. Only on occasion that there is no choice and there is a chance to win, I guess you should do ...


2

You should get some clarification from your instructor, but my guess would be that this is a policy of the school and not necessarily anything about a legal reason. If this is a college or university, they may have weird arcane policies built up based on their own liability and insurance needs. This may also have to do with avoiding getting sued if a ...


2

I think doing some sort of martial art which incorporates kicking and punching, and where you can train with a heavy bag, and do real heavy bag workouts. That's what I would do. Something like kick- & thaiboxing (preferably a martial art where you hit something with contact). A general home workout regime would be running for a couple of miles, followed ...


2

As you are already aware, martial arts are extremely difficult to learn without an instructor. My advice would be to find the best teacher you can in your area. There is really no substitute for the feedback and guidance they provide. Even if you only travel to see them once a month, you will still make better progress than learning out of a book or video. ...


2

Whatever you do in Aikido, the simple rule of thumb applies: never play fair! If your and your opponent's hands are similarly strong and you're performing your lock single-handed, than you have a very slight chance to prevail. In order to achieve the goal of your lock you have to: use both hands against the one of the opponent use your legs and body ...


2

I study in the Bujinkan, and the instructor I've been working with and I worked through all three "scrolls" of the Gyokko-ryu, and one thing about all the locks and throws there is that while we teach the locks in isolation in order to get an understanding of them, in the kata you always do something to the person before applying the lock (usually some sort ...


2

There are several things to consider. What weapons are legal where you live? Which of these do you intend to carry? In some states of the USA you can carry a gun. This makes military styles such as Krav maga much more useful as they teach you to make space to draw a gun. Where I live in the UK weapons are illegal; no guns, no blades, no sticks. As a ...


2

If they just want your belongings, give it to them, and good, you're done. Your friend is unhurt, so your friend did the right thing. The question people need to focus on is "What will make me safer?" and your friend did the thing that got him out safely. If they want your life, you're going to have to a) figure that out in time, b) figure out what ...



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