New answers tagged

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Bankuei, in his winning answer, is right that this comes down to specifics. If you really think about the situation, the person with the gun has a huge tactical advantage of having a gun, while you do not. In such an asymmetric situation, you're not going to find a general solution that wins. If one existed, guns wouldn't be such a big deal. Instead, you ...


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There are already a lot of excellent answers describing how the two compare in balance etc. Her I would like to advocate the a single technique instead of comparing the two in general. This technique is often forgotten, because it is not allowed in most sports-based martial arts: the kick to the groin, which is of course a low kick. It is the single most ...


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Here is an example of a technique against a baseball bat as taught by the Krav Maga Association "Krav Maga Global". Techniques against chairs and other larger objects are also in curriculum and work similarly. In fact they are often much easier to defend against, since they are much heavier and make the attacker more immobile. The baseball bat is the most ...


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I assume that you are not in that 2 vs 1 situation right now. I'd say you run, as far to safety as reasonable, starting right now. If you have any possessions (or family) you don't want to give up, you better start packing your bags and move out. You say you don't have the money to move, but that can't be right. You must sleep somewhere, you sell it, or if ...


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With enough experience in sparring against opponents of other disciplines, sizes, and experience levels, one can learn to read the body language of intent. With enough experience in training, one's body just does what it needs to without having to think about what it's doing. Specific self-defense scenarios may be mental traps, but knowing that you can ...


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I would back away from them until I felt I was credibly out of the range of their thrown object, and then walk/run away as necessary to deescalate the situation. If I was unable to move away from the armed aggressor because of circumstances (e.g. trapped in an enclosed space), I would attempt to feel out their speed/reflexes as I closed distance and then ...


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The odds of violent resistance against two assailants, with firearms who also have the drop on you, are not good. The best you can do is comply until the situation changes. If they don't kill you right away, you may have an opportunity to resist and/or escape at a later point. If your goal is to survive, then the best skill to have is the ability to 'read' ...


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If you're allowed to conceal and carry, you need to be more sensitive to these threats and see them coming before they happen. Arm yourself with know-how, confidence; know who and what your enemy is, and be ready before any of this dumb stuff ever happens to you. Worse comes to worst, what? 200 dollars? Is your life worth 200 bucks? More? Less? Give the ...


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If, for instance, someone has a baseball bat, you want to get closer to the side he's swinging it from. Even if you get hit around the body, you can brace for impact with your arm like a shield and it will not be debilitating if you're closer than his focal point of impact. His power is cut in half if you're 45 degrees or less from his frontal angle and thus ...


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There's basically 3 things going on with the freeze. The "easiest" hurdle (easiest to adjust your training to) is addressing practical issues of terrain, location, being out of position. Most training is done in a clear, well lit space, free of obstacles. After you get basic proficiency, your training should include adding things which put you under ...


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there is a way. first of all, actually knowing what a street fight is from an experiential standpoint (that is, learning from doing) will be invaluable. however, even though you have never stepped into that kind of thing, he's my tip you might or might not get from someone else. alright, here's my layman's blueprint for what's going on when this SH*T ...


4

It's a bit of a dirty secret really - most people who teach self defence classes know that what they're teaching will be mostly ineffective due to: the deer-in-the-headlights syndrome that you mentioned 99% of those students are not going to actively practice what they were just taught therefore if they ever manage to apply it effectively it will be ...


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One way to reliably experience using martial arts skills during an adrenaline dump is to compete in a full-contact ruleset. A judo tournament, knockdown karate tournament, and scheduled kickboxing match, would each fit the bill. Some "reality-based self-defense" schools advocate situational training, such as practicing in everyday clothes and in everyday ...


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Various forms of fencing and swordsmanship are good for learning how to use one hand effectively. Bruce Lee applied a lot of ideas from fencing to how he performed his lead punch. In some styles of historical fencing, notably British sabre, it is common to put the off hand (usually the left) behind the back. This both makes it less likely to be cut and, in ...


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I got attacked with a metal bar by a tuk tuk driver trying to rob me. I blocked it with my forearm which caused an open fracture in the process (would have hit me in the head otherwise). I managed to avoid the next few rush attacks and run away which is always the best defence. I've always been a bit sceptical about weapons drills as they seem unrealistic - ...


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There is always a counter technik; also inside the Aikido (other than punching and kicking) For every technique there is a twin technique which could be used as counter, like ying yang principle. The concept is called Kaeshi waza. Of course I would not suggest to resist the sankyo grip if your opponent/partner tori has solid control over you, it might harm ...



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