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The flinch reaction is a nervous system reaction to a stimulus in order to protect a portion of the body inherently felt to be at risk. When your nervous system is repeatedly overridden (for example, when we repeatedly stretch past the point of basic resistance) the body relaxes and the signal to fire that reflex is no longer sent under that stimulus. ...


12

Firstly I really apologise for this round about answer. To train as a martial artist really requires that you seek out proper instruction from qualified, competent instructors. They should lead you through the appropriate exercises based on your physical fitness and ability. That said, any exercise that causes sharp pain, dull continuous pain or that ...


9

Training Martial Arts Without Coaching is Not Recommended I came to the same conclusion you did in this answer on Stack Exchange Fitness: skill development without a partner and without a knowledgeable instructor is very hard, slow, and prone to producing bad habits instead of ability, so you're better off becoming a beastly physical specimen instead. Your ...


8

Stop planning your eventual wall of black belts and go get a blue belt in BJJ or a brown belt in judo or join a SAMBO school or join a wrestling club. Worry about integrating your grappling into your striking after you have some grappling skill. Try a class at each of the grappling schools in your area, pick the one with the highest quality teachers and ...


8

stslavik has the right idea. You need to dampen your current reaction so you can substitute another. Martial Arts hoodoo talk: You flinch because your mind gets caught on the idea of being hurt. If you can still your mind, your reactions will become more in line with your intent. For me the thing that's helped most is visualization. As stslavik ...


8

Honestly, the best thing you can probably start with is not going to be a martial art at all. Instead, try the following: Strength Training One of the biggest culprits in back pain, knee pain, etc can actually be corrected by increasing the strength of the surrounding muscles. I had hip issues and years and years of martial arts did not fix my hip issues, ...


6

Fitness for martial arts doesn't mean just strength or aerobic capacity. It also requires flexibility and agility. Please don't ignore stretching--both in order to be better, and also to train safer. Injuries often inhibit, even preclude, eager training. (Said by the guy who's not trained seriously for a month while nursing a shoulder injury.) When I moved ...


6

Okay well if you do wing chun that is great, so do i! Yes it is definitely worth practicing alone. Here are some of the things i do: Get a 3 section wall bag and a wet towel (with somewhere to hang it). Assuming you have correct form on your sun fist punch, you should practice punching the center of a wet towel with out any water flicking back onto you. And ...


6

Practice on your own is pretty much an unavoidable element of the martial way past a certain point. Other than developing your body through conditioning exercise (Bruce Lee's plyometrics are a good starting point), you can develop your body through breathing exercises (the Systema DVDs about breathing are pretty interesting and insightful). It is important ...


6

Well you're talking about the specifics of when and how to breathe, but maybe you really should be asking about why one breathes and what are you trying to do with it. Generally speaking, when one exhales, this creates tension in the abdominal area. At the same time that your abdomen is tensing, you will also create tension in the entire core (the abdomen, ...


5

Disclaimer: I am a beginner in both judo and physical culture. My views on strength, conditioning, and technique should be viewed with skepticism. You're right that training once a week is insufficient. Most people won't see much progress in either physical condition or skills at less than two days a week minimum. I'll address solutions in the context of ...


5

Like Sardathrion said, Cardio is very important. Stretching is also vital, I've tweaked my planting knee because I can't split my legs far enough apart. There are a number of very good books on Amazon about martial arts stretching and exercises. I know some people who self trained them selves through books, like Bruce Lee's Tao of Jeet Kune Do. But honestly ...


5

Your sensei is correct and it will take patience and practice. That is true of all things in life. For meditation / breathing. Sit in seiza. Either rest your hands in your lap, or hold your hands up, interlock the pinky, ring, and middle fingers. Extend your index fingers up and press your thumbs side by side. Breathe slowly in through your nose, and ...


4

"Meditation, breathing, or visualization" practice will not help with what is essentially a failure of physicality and technique. Technique usually improves with in-class practice, but physicality requires out-of-class work to develop for most adults who are not genetically gifted. You must attain a basic level of athleticism--that is, physical strength, ...


4

Your options as a college club are: Share what each member knows Find a coach or teacher Be a thoroughly mediocre "fight club" I recommend avoiding (3). Learning from online resources is hard and not recommended. Either accept that the styles you'll learn are the styles that each of your (possibly flaky, deranged, drama-bringing) fellow students brings ...


4

It all comes back to the question: What are you trying to do? If you're training in sword fighting, then use a sword. Just repeat the same sword cut over and over again. Try to go as fast as you can without losing accuracy. Repeat. In some amount of time, your forearms will tire. When they tire so much that either you're starting to slow down or you're ...


3

You need to work on this enough to lose all the superfluous tension in your body. If you really want to work on this, then just do standing practice. Stand, feet approximately shoulder-width apart, and then scan your body in horizontal slices (along the sagittal plane) feeling for tension. Go from your head to your toes. I would recommend trying to limit ...


2

Tai Chi. Any kind. Possibly even any teacher should do. TaiChi is neat, because of the general focus on smoothness. The movements must be carefully orchestrated and done not only with the minimum effort possible, but also with efforts to relax. The only way to relax fully, over time, is going to include fixing the posture, going as far down as the bones ...


2

This happens as a natural reaction but you can train to 'disable' this reflex. Drills: stand without defending while a colleague performs strikes(straight punches for instance) very close to your face and focus on not blinking. with large(boxing or kickboxing gloves) cover up when receiving punches and keep your eyes on your opponent through between your ...


2

Following up from @stslavik answer: Flinches are good. A controlled but instant reaction to a threat developed through muscle memory, Flailing is bad. An uncontrolled reaction to a threat that will likely get you hurt. Obviously, closing your eyes is "A Bad Thing", and that comes from you not trusting your blocking or your footwork (say, from a standard ...


2

As @stslavik already gave an excellent answer, I'll just throw in an anecdote. Not long after I started Judo, one of the more senior members of the club decided that he needed to cure my flinch that I had developed over being thrown. That evening he took me to the end of the mat and if my memory doesn't fail me, threw me solidly for at least half an hour. ...


2

Doing Luta Livre helped my back and posture problems a lot. A lot of different muscles are used in both static and explosive manner. Luta Livre is -just like Brazilian Jiu Jitsu- a submission wrestling sport, although in Luta Livre no gi is worn. The athletes usually wear tight-fitting clothes like fight-shorts and rash-guards. Apart from that the two ...


2

Reducing stress, eliminating back pain, and improving fitness have little to do with martial arts styles. Instead, they have a lot to do with the physical culture that a given school adheres to. In terms of strength, if a tai chi school has newcomers master one-leg squats, stone lifting, barbells, or gymnastics alongside forms practice, that could help. If ...


2

Do any of you hold a teaching belt in any of the martial arts you do? It also sounds like it will be more of a 'mixing all of our martial arts together' than an MMA program as is understood with cage fighting? The real thing you need is an instructor of some sort. You cannot just find highly effective street techniques; most of what you know, and what you ...


2

For explosiveness, your tools are the Olympic lifts (including preparatory work from powerlifting), box jumps, leaps, and sprints. Plyometrics can be used but as I understand it they are more appropriate for someone who is already squatting and power cleaning significant weight. For agility, your tools are footwork drills and the general practice of ...


2

In short, exhaling relaxes your muscles, giving you more of a "snap" to your techniques. But the main reason you exhale during defensive techniques is that your lungs act as shock absorbers in much the same way as a car's airbags release air in a controlled way to minimize the impact of a crash. Also, if you are inhaling or are out of breath at the moment ...


2

If you are looking for tips on how to be safe, then I am a big fan of Mark "Animal" MacYoung's No Nonsense Self Defence. It has a lot of good advice on self defence form prevention to running to safety to decreasing the risk of getting attacked. Also, the site highlights a lot of myths and rubbish which is branded as self defence. If on the other hand, you ...


1

If you want to start with a mixture of striking and grappling you should go to an MMA school where this is likely to happen but your grappling will develop slower than by joining a grappling school. On the other hand you could join: BJJ, Sambo, Wrestling or Judo depending on what you're more interested in ground work or throws. After gaining some skill you ...


1

Standing practice ideas: wear light clothing stand with feet slightly apart, knees and elbows slightly bent, just enough to be relaxed and not have your legs or arms locked stand in a breeze, different wind levels on different days, and think about how the wind feels on different parts of your body. Can you feel it moving your hands? Raise your arms a bit ...


1

Your centre is nothing more than the centre of mass of the human body. It could refer as well to the line of symmetry of the human body. I suggest you picked a book on human anatomy. The Body In Motion by Theodore Dimon is a good starting point. If you really wanted to go down the mystical route, then Oomoto might be the sect for you. It was very ...



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