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12

Running seems like it is the thing for you: You can start now and improve your techniques by going to the gym to find a trainer, going to a run club, and reading books and magazines on running. You can also get a whistle and blow it (while running to a safe place) to attract attention to your predicament. Martial arts take long time to learn. Self defence ...


8

There are two important points to consider: Full splits are not essential in many martial arts systems. Kicking itself may be secondary. The motivation behind full splits is often high kicking, which is high-risk in combat. See Low kicks vs high kicks in street fight. No one expects beginning students to have full splits. If your martial arts school ...


7

You have two requests here. First, you can learn to defend yourself against an average person relatively quickly - just as much as you can learn basic first aid, relatively quickly. Whether it will be enough or not really depends on the luck of the draw of the situation you face. Going to train once or twice a week, for a few months, in a school aimed ...


5

TL;DR No, it's not essential. Full splits are an impressive display of flexibility, but few martial arts include them as anything other than a nifty party trick or exhibitions.


5

I see no problem in training on the beach as long as the sand is dry, clean (no rubbish), relatively plain (no bumpiness) and fine (it adapts better to the impact, same reason why it should be dry). It might be slightly harder than a mat, but it's far from dangerous. It might even improve ukemi by 'punishing' bad posture or lack of tension. Modern mats are ...


3

A fundamental truth about self-defense is that the more relevant skill, strength, and experience you possess, the less damage (and pain) you need to inflict to accomplish your goal. Other than running away, there aren't many real options which offer substantive protection without a commitment to training while minimizing pain dealt to any aggressor one is ...


3

"Winning" in self defense is whatever makes you safer. Within that context, if you can get yourself out of danger, sooner, with more reliable methods, that's better. If someone is trying to hurt you, you don't know if they have friends on the way, if they're going to pull out a weapon or make something into a weapon and so on. However, "first few seconds"...


3

I found great benefits in using the paper and string. Cheap and easy - Hang paper on a string wedged between ceiling tiles or spotlight fittings. Small thin note cardboard I found to work best. Rope can be trickier, but still very simple to rig up. I had one in my office, stand up have a few hits (after a stressfull phonecall) , sit down calmly.. keeps you ...


3

Henka means "variation" or "change". In other words, a different way of doing something. It doesn't refer specifically to the kihon happo ("basics" / "essentials") of Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu, although you are expected to learn many different henka for each technique. That's part of the training. The theory goes like this: When a technique is first shown, it ...


3

Enroll in an adult gymnastics class. While you can ask them to start with the back and front flips, they'll usually have you start with more basic things and will allow you to make gradual progress towards your flips over time. And they'll teach you good form with an emphasis on safety. Safety is key, and so is being able to teach it to different people. In ...


3

Stop pretending you're learning substantial skills by practicing alone. Without a partner to give live feedback and skilled resistance, and without a knowledgeable coach to correct mistakes, you're just engaging in martial masturbation. You'll ingrain bad habits that you'll have to unlearn later. Focus on becoming the most athletic version of yourself ...


3

Real fights are not constrained by rules. There is no referee to pull you apart from a clinch, or rules against bashing the back of your head. Nothing prevents multiple people from attacking. There is no padding. If someone puts you on the ground, they can stomp you. Real fights are not like the movies, where people are bashed in one sequence and ...


2

I think doing some sort of martial art which incorporates kicking and punching, and where you can train with a heavy bag, and do real heavy bag workouts. That's what I would do. Something like kick- & thaiboxing (preferably a martial art where you hit something with contact). A general home workout regime would be running for a couple of miles, followed ...


2

As you are already aware, martial arts are extremely difficult to learn without an instructor. My advice would be to find the best teacher you can in your area. There is really no substitute for the feedback and guidance they provide. Even if you only travel to see them once a month, you will still make better progress than learning out of a book or video. ...


2

The easiest solution would be to find an adult-friendly gymnastics, parkour, street dancing, or cheerleading class. They should already have the curriculum and equipment to teach you to safely perform forward and back flips. Alternately, there are many instructional resources on the internet. Google + Parkour Backflip Tutorial = How To BACK FLIP - Free ...


2

Competitions form a social glue that pulls many people into martial arts - either as contenders or people who watch the competitions and find out about the martial art that way; for that reason they're pretty popular. They also force you to be honest about some of your ability and conditioning. You know how some of your techniques work against a live, ...


2

Quite a challenging set of criteria. To minimise pain to your opponent, you basically need to apply some hold or joint-lock until the opponent submits. The arts that try to apply joint locks while standing - in my opinion and after spending several years studying hapkido and aikido after a solid base of striking arts - require a massive gap between your ...


2

What is an "average"person? I know quite a few people that can take a lot of pain/punishment that have never trained. There are also a lot of average people that are simply just much bigger than I am. You want a 3 month, Bruce Lee in a,box course that turns you into a mystical wuxi finger hold master, and there ain't no such creature. And from a personal ...


2

Practicing striking a rope or sheet differs from striking a bag primarily in the area of resistance. The rope or sheet will give you feedback as to whether you hit it, but will not impede your strike. Some of the advantages are: No penalty for missed or badly executed strikes - This is primarily useful in my opinion for practicing kicks, where you're more ...


2

Yes it could benefit you a lot in many different ways, as an: athlete or boxer and even your physical fitness will increase. This method allows you to aim the target much more and if you didn't hit the rope, your stamina will increase as your strength goes depleted. And as time goes by, you are more aimed than any of the boxer because the target you were ...


1

All the answers here are valid but I would like to add some Info from another perspective to the questions. From my experience, I would say that your statement with "who first strikes" wins the game, is true - to some point. It is valid for a specific type of aggressor, someone unprepared that might had a couple of drinks, maybe trying to show off in front ...


1

This is a genuine concern. Many martial arts struggle with this as soon as competitions are introduced. I would like to examine first first: why are competitions useful? You have a non-compliant opponent; they will actively defend themselves and resist your attempts at aggressing or defending. Competitions provide a controlled environment, so that ...


1

Flexibility. It is not required, I don't think it is ever required in any martial art (except maybe ones that actually involve it, like say capoeira and some kicking based martial arts) It is just good for you, without flexibility you end up having lots of vulnerabilities other martial artists may not have (for example you are more vulnerable to choking ...


1

Reading these answers I have to ask how many real fights some of the posters have been in... A lot of what's taught in self-defence classes goes out the window when it happens for real, and as for avoidance being best, a lot of the time you won't be able to avoid it if it happens. Going in fast, hard and aggressive is the best way to handle it in my ...


1

Avoidance is the Best Defense Be aware of your surroundings. You're in a parking garage, fumbling with your keys, and you see someone running towards you, who appears less-than-wholesome (and you're unsure if you can get into a safe place before they arrive)? Run away! Someone pulls a knife on you? Run away! Do you have a choice between well lit, well ...


1

TL;DR The duration of a fight bares no relation to the risk of injury as clearly demonstrated by countless matches. Attacking first leaves one open to very serious legal repercussions. Expecting to be attacked at all times and places is a mark of paranoia. The duration of a fight has nothing to do with your probabilities of being injured. The nature of ...


1

The upfront caveat You don't need a full school, or even a live teacher to learn -something- although if you can get a single person to train with, even if they are a beginner and even if you only get to practice with them once a month, it will help you immensely compared to training just by yourself. The reason is that you will want to learn range, ...


1

In ideal world there are quite few you could chose from to suite you but if you dont have a teacher or at least a mentor to directly teach you, I would recommend something you can inform yourself and learn alone from videos, books, manuals or similar. As you live in conditions you described I would suggest (and this is after a thinking and eliminating) ...


1

Since you are interested in ninjutsu, you can learn techniques from Bujinkan which culminates 9 schools of martial arts (including 3 schools that teach ninjustsu). While it is important to guide your training through classes, the grand master and other practitioners have released many instructional videos for purchase and many free online videos. Along ...



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