Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Stop planning your eventual wall of black belts and go get a blue belt in BJJ or a brown belt in judo or join a SAMBO school or join a wrestling club. Worry about integrating your grappling into your striking after you have some grappling skill. Try a class at each of the grappling schools in your area, pick the one with the highest quality teachers and ...


6

Practice on your own is pretty much an unavoidable element of the martial way past a certain point. Other than developing your body through conditioning exercise (Bruce Lee's plyometrics are a good starting point), you can develop your body through breathing exercises (the Systema DVDs about breathing are pretty interesting and insightful). It is important ...


6

Okay well if you do wing chun that is great, so do i! Yes it is definitely worth practicing alone. Here are some of the things i do: Get a 3 section wall bag and a wet towel (with somewhere to hang it). Assuming you have correct form on your sun fist punch, you should practice punching the center of a wet towel with out any water flicking back onto you. And ...


6

Well you're talking about the specifics of when and how to breathe, but maybe you really should be asking about why one breathes and what are you trying to do with it. Generally speaking, when one exhales, this creates tension in the abdominal area. At the same time that your abdomen is tensing, you will also create tension in the entire core (the abdomen, ...


4

It all comes back to the question: What are you trying to do? If you're training in sword fighting, then use a sword. Just repeat the same sword cut over and over again. Try to go as fast as you can without losing accuracy. Repeat. In some amount of time, your forearms will tire. When they tire so much that either you're starting to slow down or you're ...


4

Your options as a college club are: Share what each member knows Find a coach or teacher Be a thoroughly mediocre "fight club" I recommend avoiding (3). Learning from online resources is hard and not recommended. Either accept that the styles you'll learn are the styles that each of your (possibly flaky, deranged, drama-bringing) fellow students brings ...


4

"Meditation, breathing, or visualization" practice will not help with what is essentially a failure of physicality and technique. Technique usually improves with in-class practice, but physicality requires out-of-class work to develop for most adults who are not genetically gifted. You must attain a basic level of athleticism--that is, physical strength, ...


2

This happens as a natural reaction but you can train to 'disable' this reflex. Drills: stand without defending while a colleague performs strikes(straight punches for instance) very close to your face and focus on not blinking. with large(boxing or kickboxing gloves) cover up when receiving punches and keep your eyes on your opponent through between your ...


2

Do any of you hold a teaching belt in any of the martial arts you do? It also sounds like it will be more of a 'mixing all of our martial arts together' than an MMA program as is understood with cage fighting? The real thing you need is an instructor of some sort. You cannot just find highly effective street techniques; most of what you know, and what you ...


2

If you are looking for tips on how to be safe, then I am a big fan of Mark "Animal" MacYoung's No Nonsense Self Defence. It has a lot of good advice on self defence form prevention to running to safety to decreasing the risk of getting attacked. Also, the site highlights a lot of myths and rubbish which is branded as self defence. If on the other hand, you ...


2

In short, exhaling relaxes your muscles, giving you more of a "snap" to your techniques. But the main reason you exhale during defensive techniques is that your lungs act as shock absorbers in much the same way as a car's airbags release air in a controlled way to minimize the impact of a crash. Also, if you are inhaling or are out of breath at the moment ...


2

For explosiveness, your tools are the Olympic lifts (including preparatory work from powerlifting), box jumps, leaps, and sprints. Plyometrics can be used but as I understand it they are more appropriate for someone who is already squatting and power cleaning significant weight. For agility, your tools are footwork drills and the general practice of ...


1

Practising sword play will improve your strength. Other exercises will help too. In the past I have found the most beneficial for hand strength to be finger tip press ups, pull ups and kettle bell use. All of these rely on hand strength. It is important to remember your body as a whole, bearing in mind that for for every contraction there is an expansion ...


1

Discalimer: I'm a novice in strength and conditioning, and I know just about nothing about sword training. General Strength First Activity-specific strength training is not a good idea until the student has already attained a basic level of whole-body strength. Therefore, instead of focusing on sword-specific strength training for specifically the arms, ...


1

If you want to start with a mixture of striking and grappling you should go to an MMA school where this is likely to happen but your grappling will develop slower than by joining a grappling school. On the other hand you could join: BJJ, Sambo, Wrestling or Judo depending on what you're more interested in ground work or throws. After gaining some skill you ...


1

The best thing i recommend is standard boxing sparring (with someone much better than you). Once you have been hit in the face enough times, you can keep your eyes open. You will only flinch when you have no experience. If you have racked up significant spar time you can dodge rather than flinch.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible