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8

It will be pretty difficult to do Judo alone. You can practice kung fu or any other martial art with forms (pre-arranged patterns) by yourself though. If you don't already know the martial art, though, you're setting yourself up for failure. Save yourself and any future teacher a few headaches and don't try to learn from DVDs or Youtube. Don't get me ...


5

Is a master always required to gain mastery over this martial art? Yes. If you try really hard you could get some basic ability yourself (from books, videos etc.), but to gain anything approaching mastery you need good instruction (and other skilled people to practice with). The simpler the style is technically the more you can teach yourself, so ...


5

There's two things that increase stamina: cardio (fast, regular movement) and muscle endurance. Pretty much any regular movement can do that - Shaolin training or anything else. You can do a few minutes every day up to the recommended at least 30 minutes of cardio that doctors recommend, and of course, more once you get the endurance going. Understand ...


5

Yes, no, maybe... It all depends on what you mean by "appropriate". First, the themes and matters discussed in the book are suitable for an adult. If you were a teenager or child, things might be different but at 19 you should have the matturity to read whatever you chose. Second, should you follow the advice given (if any) in the books is up to you. I ...


5

Your option to learn new things is pretty limited. Forms have some, limited value Since you've mentioned kung fu as one of the directions you might go, there's plenty of video online of various forms and lots of books to back it up that you can do. This might help you develop leg strength and coordination, but your options for learning how it ...


4

Can I learn martial arts by own? Yes you can - but all you will have is an academic knowledge of the art, you won't be able to rely on it to defend yourself. To be honest you will probably hurt yourself more than your opponent if you relied upon it without some expert instruction. You can read all the books and watch all the youtube clips you want, but ...


4

Boxing is probably the most effective "real world" martial art you could do. Especially if you cross-train in greco-roman wrestling. Bruce Lee said something to the effect that you learn more in one year of boxing and wrestling than 10 years of eastern martial arts.


3

You may want to look into some styles of escrima, kali, or penjak silat. These tend to have a lot of striking with some use of grappling and locks. These also tend to deal with weapons (knives, sticks) as well as multiple opponents, which are extra bits that are critical to self defense that often get missed in sports-focused training. Boxing gives you an ...


3

This is also a question people struggle with when wanting to return to training after a break, where it can be a bigger problem because going back in at their old level means a certain intensity from their peers. Regardless of whether taking up something new or returning to an old activity, the bottom line is participation and determination. However tough ...


3

You seem already more than fit enough. Everyone will have their own weaknesses, be it strength, stamina, balance, flexibility, or whathaveyou. All the boxing or kickboxing programs I've seen have warmup and conditioning parts to their classes/sessions. They involve rope jumping, calisthenics, shadow boxing, bag hitting, stretching, etc. Doing those, over ...


3

There's some options, though it becomes really specific to your ability. I made a youtube vid talking about the general issues of self defense with mobility issues last year. Here's some things to look at more specific to your question: Can you pivot on your weak leg? In some cases of leg weakness, people end up "locking" the leg. While this ends up ...


2

You can learn some things alone. But there's a lot of caveats worth noting. Self defense is risk reduction Martial arts can give you some tools, but it's worth noting that the best safety is avoiding danger where you can. So - the best training you can do alone right now is finding away to get yourself up on some short distance sprint training. ...


2

Buy the Tao of Jeet Kune Do. Because Reasons: The Tao of Jeet Kune Do is Bruce's treatise on his philosophy - the philosophy which underpins his later teachings. Absolute beginners should find teachers, not books, to learn technique from. You can try copying the stuff in "Bruce Lee's Fighting Method", but until you already have a basis in martial arts, ...


2

There are various options that you can take, each with its own merit. Wing Chun and/or Tai Chi is a good option but it may take some time to properly learn the techniques. If you have a long term plan this is a good option though. Wing Chun does include kicks, but it is mostly low kicks. Aikido or Judo are also good options. These though focus less on ...


2

Mastery, you want a qualified instructor. But, that's not to say there isn't anything you can learn on your own. Let's consider these factors: Conditioning You can do a lot of conditioning exercises on your own. A lot of the strength, balance and flexibility training can be done solo, and in many cases are not very different than calisthetics outside ...


1

If you want to start a martial art for fitness and mental benefits, I can highly recommend Taekwondo. There are other styles you can try too, e.g. Muay Thai, but Taekwondo is probably the most fun you'll ever have in a dojang/dojo. My problem with kung fu schools OUTSIDE of China is that they're usually not that great. The transfer of knowledge outside of ...


1

I would say Yes to the 'master' question. As for self training, I would say proceed with caution. There are many videos on youtube that you could learn from, however without a proper master, you might develop bad forms or bad habits that would be very hard to fix later on. I myself encountered this when I self-trained advanced karate forms, only to be ...


1

Boxing is pretty effective in real life and has that 1 hit knock-out power. That being said, you should also look into Wing Chun's or Tai Chi's techniques of 'push hands'. Basically they are 'arm trapping' techniques that can be used to lock opponents arm, preventing them from hitting & blocking your strikes. Aside from that, they also integrate throws ...


1

You may be able to learn a lot of useful things from watching Bill "superfoot" Wallace fight. He also has some sort of problem with one of his legs, forcing him to develop his left leg and left arm to compensate.


1

There's been some pretty good scholarship and interest in the Dadao recently. There's a few forms or methods which have managed to be incorporated/carried along with various forms of kung fu - here's some demonstrations from a Mantis kung fu school. Others are attempting to reconstruct Dadao movements from old military manuals. It's a bit difficult to ...


1

If you can't find a Jeet Kune Do school but you want to learn something similar, look for an MMA gym. Mixed Martial Arts is an outflow of Jeet Kune Do. To such an extent that Bruce Lee is referred to as "The Father of MMA". Wing Chun comprises a large portion of Jeet Kune Do, but your chances of finding a Wing Chun school that teaches proper Wing Chun are ...


1

I've given an anwser to a similar question detailing the structure of my solo training routine. http://martialarts.stackexchange.com/a/4288/3064 To answer your question if solo training is useful in my opinion, and I think this question is one of those that generates a lot of opinions and point of views which may all be different but none the less valid up ...


1

I would recommend getting something physical to punch like a punching bag if you have one. Imaginary targets are good but a bag will help you to practice at the correct distance for your art, like extending your arm the right length for a more powerful punch and parrying and all that. Watching videos on your form of martial art might help you remember them ...


1

Sounds like you have lots of wants and wishes. But the best thing is to simplify, don't try and do everything, sounds to me you want to focus on :- striking, clinching, takedowns, ground fight (no gi, with strikes). So if you lay this out to all the people with different skills, you can all contribute how you want to do each part, look at what each ...


1

MCMAP is a good martial arts program and the online resources (the guide book which can be download from the US military site is really quite good with really detailed body movements). I would suggest to start practicing the core curriculum for each belt level the double prescribed amount of hours. As above I would suggest free sparring with rules and ...



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