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3

I found great benefits in using the paper and string. Cheap and easy - Hang paper on a string wedged between ceiling tiles or spotlight fittings. Small thin note cardboard I found to work best. Rope can be trickier, but still very simple to rig up. I had one in my office, stand up have a few hits (after a stressfull phonecall) , sit down calmly.. keeps you ...


0

Based on your expressed desire not to cause pain, I would recommend a martial art that focuses on health and enlightenment. The martial arts which claim such a focus will likely direct you towards solutions that don't cause pain to yourself or others. As warned by others, the art of stopping an assailant without any pain is a topic for mastery. Pain is ...


5

I see no problem in training on the beach as long as the sand is dry, clean (no rubbish), relatively plain (no bumpiness) and fine (it adapts better to the impact, same reason why it should be dry). It might be slightly harder than a mat, but it's far from dangerous. It might even improve ukemi by 'punishing' bad posture or lack of tension. Modern mats are ...


1

Keep fit, strong, flexible, visualize. Go for a daily run, do some push-ups, sit-ups and stretching. Keep your cardio engine going. Keep your mind on your training by practicing visualization of your techniques and self-defense. This is the vital part as it helps with consolidating on what you know so far. Do this during a run Before you know it, you're ...


0

Aikido is exactly what you are looking for. Aikido is often translated as "the way of unifying (with) life energy" or as "the way of harmonious spirit." Ueshiba's goal was to create an art that practitioners could use to defend themselves while also protecting their attacker from injury. Note that : The most common criticism of aikido is ...


1

I am sorry to disappoint you. There is no such thing. Learning a self defence that minimizes the pain to yourself and others is one of those things that people seem to asking for a lot but that can never exist. It is like the proverbial wish of eating your cake and having it too... By definition, martial arts are all about effective application of pain ...


2

Quite a challenging set of criteria. To minimise pain to your opponent, you basically need to apply some hold or joint-lock until the opponent submits. The arts that try to apply joint locks while standing - in my opinion and after spending several years studying hapkido and aikido after a solid base of striking arts - require a massive gap between your ...


2

What is an "average"person? I know quite a few people that can take a lot of pain/punishment that have never trained. There are also a lot of average people that are simply just much bigger than I am. You want a 3 month, Bruce Lee in a,box course that turns you into a mystical wuxi finger hold master, and there ain't no such creature. And from a personal ...


3

A fundamental truth about self-defense is that the more relevant skill, strength, and experience you possess, the less damage (and pain) you need to inflict to accomplish your goal. Other than running away, there aren't many real options which offer substantive protection without a commitment to training while minimizing pain dealt to any aggressor one is ...


7

You have two requests here. First, you can learn to defend yourself against an average person relatively quickly - just as much as you can learn basic first aid, relatively quickly. Whether it will be enough or not really depends on the luck of the draw of the situation you face. Going to train once or twice a week, for a few months, in a school aimed ...


12

Running seems like it is the thing for you: You can start now and improve your techniques by going to the gym to find a trainer, going to a run club, and reading books and magazines on running. You can also get a whistle and blow it (while running to a safe place) to attract attention to your predicament. Martial arts take long time to learn. Self defence ...



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