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1

A fundamental truth about self-defense is that the more relevant skill, strength, and experience you possess, the less damage (and pain) you need to inflict to accomplish your goal. Other than running away, there aren't many real options which offer substantive protection without a commitment to training while minimizing pain dealt to any aggressor one is ...


1

You have two requests here. First, you can learn to defend yourself against an average person relatively quickly - just as much as you can learn basic first aid, relatively quickly. Whether it will be enough or not really depends on the luck of the draw of the situation you face. Going to train once or twice a week, for a few months, in a school aimed ...


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Running seems like it is the thing for you: You can start now and improve your techniques by going to the gym to find a trainer, going to a run club, and reading books and magazines on running. You can also get a whistle and blow it (while running to a safe place) to attract attention to your predicament. Martial arts take long time to learn. Self defence ...


2

Practicing striking a rope or sheet differs from striking a bag primarily in the area of resistance. The rope or sheet will give you feedback as to whether you hit it, but will not impede your strike. Some of the advantages are: No penalty for missed or badly executed strikes - This is primarily useful in my opinion for practicing kicks, where you're more ...


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Yes it could benefit you a lot in many different ways, as an: athlete or boxer and even your physical fitness will increase. This method allows you to aim the target much more and if you didn't hit the rope, your stamina will increase as your strength goes depleted. And as time goes by, you are more aimed than any of the boxer because the target you were ...


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Enroll in an adult gymnastics class. While you can ask them to start with the back and front flips, they'll usually have you start with more basic things and will allow you to make gradual progress towards your flips over time. And they'll teach you good form with an emphasis on safety. Safety is key, and so is being able to teach it to different people. In ...


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The easiest solution would be to find an adult-friendly gymnastics, parkour, street dancing, or cheerleading class. They should already have the curriculum and equipment to teach you to safely perform forward and back flips. Alternately, there are many instructional resources on the internet. Google + Parkour Backflip Tutorial = How To BACK FLIP - Free ...


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Don't overlook the necessity to strengthen your shoulders. Arm and hand strength are great, but you can't discount the importance of shoulder strength and endurance. Part of my warm-up routine for sword practice involves slow shoulder rotations, overhead hand claps, and side-extension isometric holds (often with swords in hand for added weight). The many ...


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In response to most comments NO to heavier that should be sword or excessive strength. Sword play it is exercise of focus and fitness not strength. If you use to much force you will find you self losing balance and sword of your opponent in your head. It is all about right amount of strength in right time. If you feel that you opponent is applying to much ...



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