New answers tagged

1

Flexibility. It is not required, I don't think it is ever required in any martial art (except maybe ones that actually involve it, like say capoeira and some kicking based martial arts) It is just good for you, without flexibility you end up having lots of vulnerabilities other martial artists may not have (for example you are more vulnerable to choking ...


2

Competitions form a social glue that pulls many people into martial arts - either as contenders or people who watch the competitions and find out about the martial art that way; for that reason they're pretty popular. They also force you to be honest about some of your ability and conditioning. You know how some of your techniques work against a live, ...


1

This is a genuine concern. Many martial arts struggle with this as soon as competitions are introduced. I would like to examine first first: why are competitions useful? You have a non-compliant opponent; they will actively defend themselves and resist your attempts at aggressing or defending. Competitions provide a controlled environment, so that ...


-1

I have Ehlers Danlos Syndrome. Our hereditary defective collagen makes us hypermobile. However I agree with poster that it has its drawbacks. Balance strength and proprioception issues. So while some of us could do a high kick without training, we could injure the joint by doing so. We are told not to do this sort of thing. Contrary to the view of many ...


0

A lot depends on where you are at in your training. If you are well on your way to mastering the fundamentals of your art, you can probably deconstruct forms from a video performance. A quick search on YouTube provides thousands of results. You can also ask your instructor if he/she has any video training aids. It might also be worth talking to your ...


-1

If you are the type to claim that sport fighting styles are actually "martial arts", then, my answer to you is "While it is not true that martial arts require full splits to learn, it is also true that your ability to progress in that style would be greatly improved if you were capable of doing full splits." On the other hand, if you are not the type to ...


0

The only feasible answer is, given whatever set of constraints you must consider (time, money, health, etc.), try as many as possible and then choose to study whichever art(s) you enjoy the most.


7

There are two important points to consider: Full splits are not essential in many martial arts systems. Kicking itself may be secondary. The motivation behind full splits is often high kicking, which is high-risk in combat. See Low kicks vs high kicks in street fight. No one expects beginning students to have full splits. If your martial arts school ...


5

TL;DR No, it's not essential. Full splits are an impressive display of flexibility, but few martial arts include them as anything other than a nifty party trick or exhibitions.


3

Henka means "variation" or "change". In other words, a different way of doing something. It doesn't refer specifically to the kihon happo ("basics" / "essentials") of Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu, although you are expected to learn many different henka for each technique. That's part of the training. The theory goes like this: When a technique is first shown, it ...



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