Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

Sparring should emphatically not end in you being beaten bloody, no matter the sport. Sparring is a contact activity, and you should expect to take some knocks, but it is also an activity founded on control and trust. There's an important difference between toughening up and learning to take a hit and actually being harmed. This is doubly important for ...


16

I don't think the science is settled to a degree where we can give a solid answer, or make too many specific conclusions. Disclaimer: I'm not a kickboxer, and I haven't studied the subject deeply. Dementia pugilistica Getting hit in the head is not good for your brain. Getting hit a lot in the head is very bad for your brain. That's true regardless of ...


12

If the students are going too hard on the beginners, the instructor either don't care or has lost control of the class. It's his or her responsibility to make sure everybody is safe. Most good schools ease their beginners into sparring. They start of with some light sparring, and then progress from there. Even pro fighters spar easy a lot of the time, as ...


10

I'm going to be very precise with my answer here. Your technique will remain the same, your kicks and punches should still be the same as when you practice them. What does change though is your approach to your opponent so that you can deliver that technique. Because your opponent is taller, you will have more issues than it just being harder to reach their ...


10

The primary change is that daredevil / suicide moves now lose all interest. Jumping up and hitting the top of the head Spinning kicks, in particular the spinning hook/reverse/something kick to the head super-lunge-punch All these moves, and more, are now begging for punishment much more than before, when a judge might decide to call a point and stop the ...


10

Try talking to them; You're sparring so they working on their toughness is dumb; toughness is not a skill that increases with practice*; it's a deteriorating factor. Being tough is a good quality to have, but it should never be someone's primary way to win. It's a backup. During sparring, where you are trying to improve, you should be working on (placing) ...


9

"It depends." Partly on your goals, partly on what you hope to achieve via sparring. First things first: If shin guards are standard in your studio or if your instructor recommends them, then absolutely get them. You might talk to the senior students and see if they agree with the advice before springing for them, but this is one of the situations you ...


8

I would advocate that you throw the boil & bite mouthguard away and spend the money to get a properly moulded one from your dentist or orthodontist. The advantage these have is that they are moulded very closely to your teeth, and they are very hard to dislodge. Consequently you don't end up distracted by it while sparring and don't end up gagging from ...


8

I can give a Hapkido perspective on this, since at least at my dojang we are taught that you keep your fists closed until you reach 1 dan, at which point you can open them (and do so more and more as you go up from there). We relax it a bit for blocks (we don't teach hard blocks until 9th kup), but not for attacks. There are two major reasons we give for ...


8

There are several things I can think of that might help, depending on exactly what the underlying problems are. Slow Repetition The most fundamental thing I've ever seen improve speed is slow repetition. We say that "speed comes from repetition" in my Hapkido class and when I trained with a rapier we had similar expressions: you had to go slowly before you ...


8

It sounds like you are fighting people tougher than you, a lot of the time this means you can be faster. Every time they throw a punch, do a quick strike to spots like the side of their arm, in between the tricep and bicep. Strike to their armpits. Strike upwards to their lats and if you can, down on their trapezius muscle. Also try striking the inside of ...


8

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


7

First of all, ask yourself this - why are you getting frustrated? Is it because you're getting your ass handed to you? Or is it because you find yourself almost getting something, but not quite? If it's because you're getting your ass handed to you...well, that's what you get for sparring with the black belts. :P But seriously, though, even if they're ...


6

In Tae Kwon Do, we definitely are trying to win, but we aren't going to kill each other over it. When I first started sparring, I got kicked quite often, and thought, "Oh Jesus this hurts" but after a while, I got used to it. Sparring hurts when you first start, but you get used to it. If you find that you keep getting hurt, something is wrong. If you find ...


6

In a perfect world, your mouth guard should fit for the life of the guard if properly molded in the first place. It is extremely common, however, to have a mouth guard that doesn't properly retain its shaping, mostly because of a relaxation or remodeling of the guard from wear, being cleaned with too high of heat, or simply from never having been properly ...


6

In rapier we would encounter this problem all of the time: You'd go up against opponents in sparring that were significantly weaker or stronger than you all of the time, and you have to learn to not walk over the weaker opponents so that they could still have a good game and learn something while working on your technique. First, though, let me say that ...


6

I would argue that there is no such progression. While push-hands may look like a "slowed down" version of sanshou, it is an entirely different exercise on its own. The only way to progress to sanshou is to start doing it. Edit: To elaborate, the practice of sanshou (or free form sparring if you like) is an integral (albeit rarely practiced) part of ...


6

I use gel handwraps for boxing, and have used gel gloves. My experience with foam is that it compresses and shifts over time in your gloves, whereas gel gloves seem to do this less, and last a bit longer as a result. This is entirely anecdotal, based on my personal experience.


6

Circle them in the direction of their weaker hand. So if they're right-handed, circle counter-clockwise. This makes it very difficult for them to go toe-to-toe with you and they'll have to concentrate on more technical boxing. Think Mohamed Ali versus Mike Tyson. Also, the old chestnut about float like a butterfly, sting like a bee applies: close the gap, ...


6

Fighting disciplines (such as Muay Thai, boxing etc.) Can cause multiple eye traumas. If your vision becomes blurry or if the pain doesn't go away you might want to consider consulting a physician. You can learn more on potential eye injury from blow to the head by reading these articles: Giovinazzo VJ, Yannuzzi LA, Sorenson JA, Delrowe DJ, Cambell EA. ...


5

An open hand requires less tension, which means faster movements. Once you have acquired the awareness/control over your hand, and your fingers aren't all over the place, it is to your benefit to modulate the tension and change your hand's position. I know that when I spar, with closed hands, I feel like I have much fewer options available, and I feel like ...


5

Short answer - catch your shin on your opponent's knee or elbow in a roundhouse kick without shin guards and see how you feel. ;) Or, to look at it another way - Do targets defeat the purpose in training? Does a face mask or mouth guard defeat the purpose of training? Does practising with dull/not metal throwing stars or a wooden blade defeat the purpose? ...


5

As a yellow belt, you have to realize you are just beginning. The most dangerous time in a student's career is when they are between the yellow and green belt level. It's because they know more than most of their friends, and might even be able to win a fight or two. Part of your training is to learn how to deal with defeat and not let it defeat you. ...


5

What you are describing in your question sugggests to me that this is indeed a bad club, or at least a bad trainer. Let's Pitting a beginner against a guy with years of experience is only a good idea if the trainer trusts the more experienced guy to hold back and not beat the beginner up. The goal should be to show the beginner where he makes mistakes, ...


5

It seems you are suffering a rush of adrenaline when you get hit, hence why you speed up and can take (or are prepared to take) further hits. Overall, this rush of adrenaline is bad and should be avoided. Adrenaline is great when little old ladies need to lift crashed cars off people or you need to sprint into a burning building to save someone. While ...


5

If you're conditioning your body, shin guards defeat the purpose. If you're sparring, shin guards allow you to walk home afterwards.


5

If there's one thing I've learned over the years of training (Ninjutsu as well): It's better to have the equipment and not need it than to need it and not have it. If the instructor suggests them, buy them; he'll make your life hell if he thinks you're not taking his advice. Any sort of padding will make the training less realistic, but is that necessarily ...


5

The biggest risk with concussions is getting a second one shortly after the first. For competetive boxers and kickboxers, this means the 10 count and standing 8 count are sentencing them to long term brain damage. If you're training casually, wearing very good headgear (Winning FG-2900 if you can afford it, Rival d3o would seem to be a good second choice) ...


5

I have two methods I rely on when I become a counter-puncher (or counter-thrower, or passive grappler). The first is to simply attack constantly. You will become tired. That's okay, you'll get in better condition. You will make mistakes. That's okay, mistakes are what practice is for. Start every round (against competent, non-noob partners) with an ...


4

I'm a first dan black belt, and on the taller side. What really is effective on me is getting close, in other words, get past my legs so I can't kick. The problem is, if your tall opponent is fast, getting past is hard. I'd suggest (after having people do this to me numerous times) is let the tall person kick first, then 빠른 발, a kick that (I don't know the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible