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26

NO!!!!! Get out. Get out now. As in, do not train there even one more time. There is always the chance of being injured in any martial art. That's true of any active sport, of course--but "combat sports" have an intention of everyone getting hit, kicked, etc. The requirement for safety is therefore paramount. You need to train safely if you are going to be ...


20

Your question isn't what you are really asking. Your question is "Can I learn Kung Fu without sparring", and that answer is yes. Sparring is not 100% necessary to learn any art. You can learn all the kicks, punches, blocks, stances and so forth without ever facing anything more than a heavy bag or possibly a human holding a pad/shield. What you really want ...


18

Can anyone learn martial arts techniques without sparring? Sure! I mean, you can learn that they exist. Can you learn how to effectively apply martial arts techniques without sparring? Oh, no. Gosh no. No, no, no. Nope. Sparring is how we turn things we know of into things we know how. Until you can do it in sparring it's all a bunch of theory. Not ...


10

What you're describing is a sensitivity to your own violent thoughts and actions. You feel bad even thinking about inflicting pain on a training partner, even if it's just a "tap" which you know causes no real pain. Just the thought of hitting someone over and over again causes you to feel bad. And so after 3 years of being in a style that practices that ...


9

You're answering your own question here. In sparring they can't go light and hit with momentum and throw dangerous moves. I have seen another guy get an elbow to on the back of his neck and haven't seen him in weeks I got a very strong hook that gave me a huge black eye (after asking for them to go lighter). Last week during a seminar in ...


8

I had a Trig professor in college who asked us on day one, "What do math and sex have in common?" The answer was, "You cannot learn them through reading about them in books, and you cannot learn them through watching other people do it. You can only learn them through participation." Martial arts is so varied that one has to first ask, "What do you want to ...


7

Drills are meant to teach your muscles to perform a technique properly. I would pad the hell out of the recipient before I let another student hit him/her full-force. It's not about inflicting damage, it's about learning how to do something properly and with force. That's how I do it anyway. There's no sense in punching the hell out of each other each time. ...


7

Defending punches by putting a glove against your face is not a successful strategy without big gloves. With MMA's small gloves or without gloves at all, it is a Bad Idea. To be truthful, it's not an optimal strategy in boxing or kickboxing, either: you still take a substantial impact. Instead, work your rolling, bobbing and weaving, slipping, and parrying, ...


5

I've always considered non contact tournaments to be a lottery, but even in full contact matches you will get calls that go against you that you don't agree with - that is the nature of the sport. I would (politely!!) question the organisers and determine whether they have a review process for decisions. If they do then the referees/judges will have to ...


5

I think a good analogy is that sparring is to martial arts training as internships/work placement is to job-focused education, in that it gives you a taste of what the "real world" is like. You can learn a lot hitting a bag (just like you can learn a lot in school), but ultimately there is only so much that you can learn there compared to sparring with a ...


5

Anderson Silva, an MMA fighter with a muay Thai background, has executed low-kick catches in the UFC against Chael Sonnen (to an inside leg kick, no less) and James Irvin, as described in this Judo Chop article. The James Irvin kick catch was simply spectacular, and seems like it would apply well to strict MT competition as well. (Note that the Irvin kick ...


5

You should get out. While it's true that any training there is a spectrum of how hard you may want to go - from the no-contact doing only forms kind of training up to folks like the Dog Brothers using full force stick fighting... the fact is that there's a point after which you are taking injuries and gaining nothing. And if the school is going harder than ...


5

Asking for a strategy upfront is not going to be beneficial, especially on the internet - we have never met this opponent so all we know is he's bigger and stronger than you (and we have no idea how big you are). Train hard. Be confident in your knowledge and capabilities. You should start learning to read your opponents - it's an important skill to have, ...


5

It is the same as asking if you can learn a language without having conversations with real people. In a sense, yes, you can learn to read and write that language from books and instruction. But you'll be in for a heck of a big surprise if dropped into a city where people speak that language for real -- everybody will talk so much faster than you imagined ...


4

Attempting such a kick is one thing, but given how easily the opponent can pull push or twist you with the leg they're holding, and all the ways in which your attempted kick might miss or make more or less contact than hoped, it's very presumptuous to assume anything about how you'll land afterwards let alone "fall with the hands to the floor and bring your ...


4

The legality of the move has already been answered by Juann and others in the comments. Even if it was legal, this would be a poor option. If a Muay Thai opponent grabs your leg (catches your kick), the next thing they are going to do is smash the thigh of your supporting leg. They are not going to give you a moment to start launching your own convoluted ...


4

I'm guess that "Sockgate" is referring to this incident? There's a good description of the "SensorHogu" technology in this article. They use piezoelectric sensors, which is the use of crystalline materials that react to impact with releasing a small burst of electricity. They require a sharp impact, which matches with what one wants for a tournament setup. ...


4

I've been practicing Wing Chun (Wang Kiu lineage) for over a year now...having just been introduced a little to sparring with kicks allowed, I tend to try to automatically block kicks with my arms. Emphasis mine. This is your problem. Flinchy reactions to normal attacks is caused by either A) not knowing what to do or B) not sparring enough under ...


4

This answer makes the assumption that you're talking about reaching down to block low kicks with your arms, which your question seems to indicate. In Wing Chun, the rule of thumb is that the hands address anything above the waist, and kicks anything below the waist, with some overlap in the groin region. If the kick is coming at your head you should be ...


4

No. Are you learning to throw punches and kicks, or are you learning to fight? You always need to spare with someone to learn how to fight. How could a boxer be a champion if he never boxed with anyone? Martial arts is not just about throwing punches and kicks, it's also about quickly adapting to your opponents move and style. If you never sparred with ...


4

Several sports aside boxing and martial arts (such as soccer, rugby, ice hockey) have the potential to cause damage. So, the risks are real and clear (for example: Kickboxing sport as a new cause of traumatic brain injury-mediated hypopituitarism), as they are for any sports that allows contact. That said, how severe the risk is? This is a difficult ...


4

I think that the key to finding an answer (as is often the case) lies within formulating properly the question. Learning "kung fu" by itself is difficult to define, since basically kung fu means simply being highly skilled in something (as compared to wushu which is the actual fighting training). But, to get closer to your question, how do you actually ...


4

The video is from the World Martial Arts Association which was setup by Michael T. Dealy in the early 1990s, Mike Dealy trained under Grandmaster Duk Sung Son. The style is Chung Do Kwan, a form of Tae Kwon Do with light or no-contact. The WMAA has a video channel on Youtube, but about a year ago all video's were removed, probably because of the criticism ...


4

As a competitor, it is not your place to criticise the judges' decisions. You should show proper decorum and fair play even if you know the decision is the wrong one. You can (and clearly in your case, should) bring it up with yours manager/team captain and ask why you did not win. If there is something not right, your manager or team captain or whoever is ...


4

My advice whenever you're facing either someone who's more advanced or bigger is to concentrate on your basic, "high percentage" techniques and be as precise and as quick as you can. Stick to things you know well, and avoid any temptation to do something "cool" or something you've just recently learned. In another answer, I discussed what "high percentage" ...


3

If you are not happy with a judge's decision, you should take it up with the head official. The head official is usually not the senior judge. In my own organization, the head official was our Grand Master, while the head judges were instructors from various dojangs. Just take note of the fact that the head official is there to make sure the sport's image ...


3

Fear is the point here. On the same line of pain and fear which you've already experienced, if you go on you will need to cope with rage, adrenaline dumps, loss of confidence or willingness to surrender, bleeding, inability ot breathe normally, extreme fatigue and not being able to fight back properly. Even losing consciousness or having some bone broken are ...


3

If the kick is slow enough or sloppy enough to be caught, then yes you should catch it. Why not - it's there for the taking. In a non-tournament situation (i.e. real life) catching a kick should mean fight over. When shouldn't you catch a kick? When you run the risk of breaking your arm by getting it in the way, or you become vulnerable to further ...


3

Regularly hammering the heavy bag with heavy gloves will compress and deform their padding, so they won't provide the expected protection (to your opponent), rendering them illegal to use in competition. Light gloves still give your skin some protection compared to being bare-knuckled - you can train a bit harder and longer. Can also help avoid repeatedly ...


3

The short answer, is you will learn a martial art, but will be unable to fight effectively. This is based on personal experience and backed up by a few authors. This is based on the fact I learned more from boxing and judo (both full contact arts that focused on getting in front of another person) in a few months than I did from 10 years of Karate (and that ...



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