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10

Try talking to them; You're sparring so they working on their toughness is dumb; toughness is not a skill that increases with practice*; it's a deteriorating factor. Being tough is a good quality to have, but it should never be someone's primary way to win. It's a backup. During sparring, where you are trying to improve, you should be working on (placing) ...


7

It sounds like you are fighting people tougher than you, a lot of the time this means you can be faster. Every time they throw a punch, do a quick strike to spots like the side of their arm, in between the tricep and bicep. Strike to their armpits. Strike upwards to their lats and if you can, down on their trapezius muscle. Also try striking the inside of ...


6

Circle them in the direction of their weaker hand. So if they're right-handed, circle counter-clockwise. This makes it very difficult for them to go toe-to-toe with you and they'll have to concentrate on more technical boxing. Think Mohamed Ali versus Mike Tyson. Also, the old chestnut about float like a butterfly, sting like a bee applies: close the gap, ...


6

I would simply argue that not every strike needs to be debilitating in order to be effective. Most jabs aren't knockout-worthy, but the jab remains a critical piece of any effective boxer's arsenal. The inside leg kick does damage. Further, the inside leg kick is an important weapon to attack the opponent's footwork and disrupt their planned steps or kicks. ...


3

As Jack Slack notes in his discussion of body punching in MMA, one of the most successful methods for setting up a punch to the body is forcing the opponent to shell up first: 0:04 Max Holloway uses a double left hook (or a lever punch) to keep his opponent's hands high before sneaking a palm down right hook in to the body (George Foreman style) and a ...


3

Yes, you have a high risk of getting your nose broken at some stage if you continue with Muay Thai. It isn't Tiddly Winks* - you will eventually get an injury, not just from landed punches but also from kicks. If you are at all attached to your nose (pun intended) the reconsider Muay Thai. Personally I've had my nose broken half a dozen times or more - the ...


3

I have had similar issues when training with more skilled/experience people than I am. These are some things that help me: Focus on relaxing my breathing. If my breathing is under control, so am I, mostly. Don't stare your opponent in the eyes. This is a big problem for most people and actually make your a worse fighter, since you it's harder to track what ...


2

Based on my training, open handed blocks are acceptable and even encouraged, but these may be different then what you are thinking of. We use an open hand to push the blow aside by striking the side of the incoming fist, the wrist, or the forearm. This is certainly something which requires having built up a sense of timing, but it can be quite effective. The ...


2

Try to kick a little wider and hit with your shin, unbalance them right as they step down on a jab for example. You can disrupt their balance with this kick. A few good ones will hurt their leg, even in sparring with shinpads on. You can attack with it; use it to set up strikes to the head, or you can counter his advance with it as he jabs in; it ruins the ...


2

It all depends on your meaning of offensive fighter. He is offensive and physically much stronger / much more experienced than you. Same level physically / experience wise but offensive If it's the first one, then you are out of luck. You have got to train more as there is nothing much you can do. You can land a lucky shot occasionally but that would ...


2

When you punch to the body don't keep standing up; you need to change your level. Dip through your legs, like a small squat and duck down, like you would if you duck a punch. You don't just bend at the waist and lean over, you squat down. From there you can punch your regular punch. (i.e. a straight/hook) Your ideas for when to throw the bodyshots are ...


1

5 years of sparring / competitions, I would say that the likely hood of getting an injured nose is low, but it is still there. Most injuries i suffered on the head are basically on the jaw and side of the heads. *Ouch. The main thing to remember if you get injured in your nose is that if it bleeds for more than a day, please get an Xray as it might be ...


1

If you want to prevent a nose injury use headgear that protects your face . Here is an example http://store.titleboxing.com/facprottrain.html Otherwise, broken noses are common injuries to unprotected faces. Broken noses can affect your quality of life by affecting your appearance and breathing.


1

Since you know Muay Thai, you know you have a lot of close range weapons. There isn't a need for a close range body punch most of the time. Punches are more for medium-short to medium-long distance. Using your elbows and knees are for totally short distance right? And I'm sure you've heard that from your Muay Thai class or whoever you train with. I'm not an ...


1

A good time is when you are circling away from their power hand. Throw some jabs or combos at their head and move away from their power. Then once in a while circle in closer to them and throw a punch at their kidneys. If they are right handed, circle to their left, punch with your right keeping your left guard up. They might get a bad angle punch with their ...


1

Why punch when you can kick/knee? Body punch is basically used in MT to hit areas like the solar plexus or rib cage. These areas are very very painful when hit, but are a bit hard to hit with knee or kicks in short range. Elbows won't reach as well. The thing is it is crucial to keep one hand up to protect while hitting with the other. Sneaking in a shot ...


1

I like Juann's advice to circle towards their weaker hand, and it sounds like you're already closing then disengaging. I'd add: don't get fixated on the punches. I often have to remind myself of this as I'm a heavy hitter and a perfectionist and don't like to concede anything, and I train mainly kyokushin these days which easily degenerates into a slug ...


1

have you thought about cross-training? Meeting force with force is not always the best way; it might be useful to check what other martial arts have in their arsenal. Try to take a few aikido classes (just for fun), it could change the way you box with some opponents (even if you can't use the actual aikido moves while boxing, your mind will be changed ...


1

I know one thing intercept the punch if you can't block it. Cut them off don't let them full force punch you by standing there. Also,foot foot foot footwork! Front, back, sideways and circle left or right. Footwork footwork footwork that's like everything. Also try push hands for dodging strikes.


1

If the reason for your mental block is because you don't want to hurt your sparring partner, then you must think about it this way: If you don't attack your sparring partner, your sparring partner will most likely not learn anything from the fight regarding defense, and will possibly feel insulted that you find it hard to attack because you might hurt him. ...


1

I am now studying TKD after many years of sparring open handed whilst learning Kung Fu. Tonight my sparring partner took exception to this non TKD technique. I obliged him with closed fist inner and outer blocks. I did not have the same level of control and of course this means striking bone against bone, rather than palm against bone. The consequence is ...


1

I had the same problem and I got to the bottom of it. I searched for what caused my frustation. First I worked out my ego. During martial arts most of the frustration is caused by fear of humiliation. If you are stressed during sparring that is because your ego fights back. Deep inside you fear loosing against your spar partner. From puberty to adulthood ...


1

The best solution for this is to gain experience. Experience is what teaches you to remain calm during contact sessions. There's no meditation mumbo-jumbo that will keep you calm when you get punched in the face. The only answer is to get used to it. And the only way to get used to it is to experience it. A lot. It's utter horse-puckey to let a yellow belt ...



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