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If I do not fully understand a technique, they will hit me with more and more power Are "they" other students in your class? And are they attempting to learn an offensive technique compared to your defensive one? I ask because they may be more focused on their own training than on yours if that is the case, and increase their power as they get more ...


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I wont claim to be a sparring expert, but I've had a lot of fun playing with the information-theory side of combat (how to avoid telegraphing and such), and I see some patterns in your questions which cropped up in my work with information-theory. It takes a surprisingly long time to make up your mind. It's estimated it takes 100ms-300ms between receiving ...


0

Training should be progressive for ALL students. A basic outline for training, with each step starting slow and progressively increasing speed: solo air training to learn movements dummy training, for example with striking bags prearranged partner exercises to develop reactions sparring Skipping straight to sparring is an invitation to trouble. And if ...


5

First off, consider therapy. I know that it's not exactly martial arts advice, but it sounds like you've undergone a great deal of trauma and frankly, us just giving you training advice would be like giving cadence tips to a runner with a broken leg. You have been damaged and you need a qualified medical professional to help you with that damage. Past that, ...


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Looking at your description of the problems you have, there are three things you can do: Practice Practice and Practice Really, all those are rookie mistakes, to put it bluntly. The fact that you hit one or two times and then stop, means you lack understanding of the feel and flow of the fight that only comes from seasoning and constant practice. You ...


1

First of all. Although this question already has many answers basically re-iterating the same, please let me repeat that there is a fine line between training hard in martial arts and abusive behavior, and at least on the surface of it, it seems like what you are enduring tends towards the latter. However, there is always (at least) two sides to any story. ...


0

Disclaimer: I am a male and wasn't in the same situation but i want you to give some advice. I did 5 diffrent martial arts myself and found it quit hard not to confuse arts of the same type (e.g striking arts). Also i had problems working on Wing chun foottwork, which is quit diffrent from the Kickboxing footwork, which i learnt before. And for this i have ...


0

Sparring is absolutely essential to learning how to deal with live energy. I would like to caution you though. Sometimes sparring can create bad habits what I mean by this is: To often a practitioners go into sparring with the wrong mindset. They simply try and unload on their opponent. If you are doing this without protection gear someone is going to get ...


1

Your classmates should not be deliberately hurting you during a class. There is a place for hard training, so you know what it feels like, but it should only ever happen once the proper technique has been learned. The behaviours you describe (leg sweeping, joint locks, etc.) strongly suggest that the men you are training with do not understand how to help ...


2

Talk to your instructor. Your instructor should pair you up with another woman with similar build/height, but if the situation does not permit such arrangement then your male partner should know better than to go full force on you. It might be good practice but if you don't learn anything and only getting injured, it is not going to do any good to you. ...


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Sparring is simply a simulation of a fight and it is done for practice. There are many types of sparring, ranging from step-by-step sparring to controlled sparring to free sparring. The instructor needs to understand the capabilities of his students before letting them attempt free sparring. Students usually begin with the most basic form of sparring. In ...


2

To echo more of what everyone else is saying: there is a fine line between abusive behaviour and hard training. My reading of your question is that your sparing partners have crossed it. Did they do that knowingly or by mistake I cannot tell. Some schools do go for a harder than rocks attitude that if you do not bleed, you are not training hard enough. Are ...


2

Quite frankly, it sounds like you're in an abusive training environment. The language you're using is uncomfortably similar to what I might hear from someone being beaten up by their spouse, the "they only hurt me badly when I'm doing things wrong" and making excuses for their behavior. It is possible that you're in a situation where you're literally out of ...


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You seem to practise a kind of boxing. If you are a woman and a beginner I would suggest you to begin with a softer martial art (Aïkido...), but even in this case it's not 100% sure because it all depends on people. Another solution is just to change school and find a school with some women so you can spar with women and/or with men who have a minimum of ...


1

Practice combinations. Doesn't matter if they're stupid, as long as they exist. E.g. try a 2 punch, one kick combo: Right Body shot Left Cross to the face Right Roundhouse to the head or switch around if you're left-handed. But ALWAYS attack with combinations. Single attacks don't do much until you've learned to intercept rather than counter. There is ...


7

There's two issues here: Ranging for Contact and Force This is a problem I see with folks who train for non-contact in their drills or doing "air sparring" - you train yourself to punch 2-3 inches away from actual contact, and you end up learning to attack, and evade/block, at those ranges. First thing, is your drills and training have to be at the ...


5

Hi have a trained a couple of ladies over the years and here is my take on it. For starters, there is a difference between training hard and just getting beat up. While I believe that is very important that you treat a women the same way you treat a man it is also important to not discourage a women from training. First - As a women you should be aware ...


7

Accidents happen. However, when you have an accident with people you are not really trying to hurt - you make extra effort to make sure the accident doesn't happen again - otherwise it is not an accident. If someone's ego at losing in sparring causes them to attempt to really injure someone, that is not a safe person to work with. Consider what you are ...


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In my experience as a male trainer and trainee the key for a hard, educational or maybe painful training is trust between all parts of the training group. Female fighters have told me that they were beaten up in training after they told their opponent to slow down. Afterwards they felt violently abused. So in such a case the trainer has the responsibility ...


1

He is overly aggressive and competitive. He essentially bullies students that >are newer to contact sparring and thus less able to handle his intimidation >techniques while in the ring. He also lacks fitness and so makes up for this by >going in even harder - especially on the students that can challenge him >technically. Seems your's is a ...


2

When I was in Taekwondo I was this kid. I wasn't arrogant but I was very tough on the other students below my level. I didn't beat them up but you could tell I was punishing on them and they didn't enjoy their sparring time. I thought it was fun. So the head instructor started inviting other head instructors from other schools to assist during our ...


3

This is a problem for me as well. This is usually due to friction tearing your skin open as you try to pivot. Look for some shoes you can wear during training. Skeletoes work really well for me, but I usually split my toes due to hardwood, not mats. They do make mat-specific shoes. Use "New Skin" or some other brand of liquid bandage to seal up your ...


3

In our schools we mix up our sparring training so that we can have everybody sparring simultaneously at times. At others times a couple of choice students spar whilst the others watch. Pausing frequently to swap students and give feedback (positive-negative-positive for morale/confidence). This method also allows an instructor to act as a referee (you can ...


9

Is the student toxic?1 If yes then get ride of him as soon as possible. If they have no desire to change, then they have to go. Actually, that might be harsh: offer him the choice of either mending his ways or training elsewhere. If maybe, then you have to figure out if they are willing to change their behaviour. Again, you need to talk to them in an open ...


0

Don't let the weak students fight him. He is obviously going to be a great fighter, so reigning him in is just going to make him frustrated and force him to quit. By the same token, letting weaker students spar with him will demoralise them and make THEM quit. So have him fight someone in a higher weight class/ age bracket if possible.


3

Do you know what the student wants out of the class? I have found the first place to look for resolution is to look for a win-win. If there is a way the Chief Instructor can help him accomplish what he wants to get from the class without affecting the others, then that is the win-win. Of course, this is not nearly so easy as typing a paragraph about how ...



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