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34

What you have heard is at least partly wrong. Heavy weight lifting can be about increasing size, but it is more often about directly increasing strength (it's part of the distinction between a bodybuilder and a powerlifter). The expression is that "no one gets bulky by accident." I also have never seen any reliable evidence that it makes you slower at ...


18

Weight training is very useful for martial arts. Sports scientist and martial artist Tom Kurz notes: Taekwondo master Hee Il Cho, famous for his powerful and precise jumping kicks, says, “Weight lifting can help athletes in any sport, including the martial arts. The more strength and size you have, the better you will perform. If two people weigh the ...


13

Footwork is not just about moving in the right directions, it's also about getting there quickly and being in balance as you do it. Footwork will be no good to you if you are a lumbering elephant with no balance or dexterity. A couple of ways to get lighter on your feet are: skipping. While used extensively in boxing for fitness, it also teaches you to ...


12

There are several things I can think of that might help, depending on exactly what the underlying problems are. Slow Repetition The most fundamental thing I've ever seen improve speed is slow repetition. We say that "speed comes from repetition" in my Hapkido class and when I trained with a rapier we had similar expressions: you had to go slowly before you ...


8

As my sensei says, "there is the right amount of power and speed in the technique". Basically, what he is saying is that if you do it right, the speed will come on its own. Foundation That said, there is a difference between speed, strength, and power. It's one thing to say you can put 400lbs on your back and squat with it. That speaks to strength. It'...


7

I'd say that doesn't sound like a footwork issue, but rather like a problem of timing and distance. If you jab and your opponent has time to counter with a side kick then you are to far away. Try to work out your exact range for the different types of techniques (using a heavy bag or any other target, or just a wall if you don't have equipment. Don't ...


5

Stairs work really well. Power up and down, take them multiple steps at a time, go sideways, backwards, everything. Put as much vertical power into your step as possible. Second thing to try is working in front of a mirror or with a videocamera. This way you can watch your form and see where your sticking points are and where you're making unnecessary ...


5

First off I wouldn't worry about accidentally turning in to Arnold. Body builder forums are littered with people struggling to gain mass. It's much tougher than you think and you'd have to be REALLY focused on gaining mass and not just strength to even have much of a chance of that happening. While strength is not always paramount in many martial arts, it ...


4

Absolutely it does! When I was training judo seriously, I was in the gym lifting weights 3x a week. In most martial arts, you don't want to get huge and bulky like THelper mentioned. But it's easy to train explosive power and balance and endurance, all of which will help your martial arts training.


3

Bud Jeffries has a great article on this; http://www.strongerman.com/articles/martial-arts-and-strength/ He's a strongman, not a bodybuilder, so is much more in line with what martial artists should be interested in. He addresses the pros and cons, particularly noteworthy is that with his focus on strength training he doesn't train as much for skill, so ...


2

Tom Kurz' book, Science of Sports Training, has a chapter on speed training. Some of the major relevant points for your question: Sports fall into five groups according to how they require speed. Your training falls into the first of these, "demanding maximal manifestation of all three components of speed [reaction time, time of a single movement, time of ...


2

Just a small note: I am not a fan of using wrist and ankle weights when training in martial arts for a couple of reasons: It places a large amount of weight out at the ends of long levers (arms/legs), which makes it really easy to hyperextend the joints when doing any kind of technique at speed. Contrary to popular belief, training with a heavy object can ...


2

I think I have something similar. For myself, my current conclusion is that I lacked skill in entry. The idea of "speed" is more of a method to enter within range where I have the advantage. The strategy I have chosen to implement this is less of speed, and more of moving in a way that does not set off someone's reactions. This was built on top of the ...


2

Weight training can be beneficial, and some martial arts have a set of supplementary exercises (in Okinawa Goju Ryu we call it Hojo Undo) where you use tools like Chi'ishi (stone on a stick), Ishi-sashi (stone handles - ancient type of Kettle bell) and Nigiri Gamen (a couple of vases with necks in a size to fit a palm) for weight training. The advantage of ...


1

I've had a solid 2 years of strength training including Olympic weightlifting before starting martial arts, which I've pursued for over ten years since my first real fight. Strength training for minimum two years is a must for adding the necessary bulk to compete in fighting at a high level, but to really stand-out, you need weightlifting. That's why I was a ...


1

Strength training alongside of doing your martial art of choice is key. I've pumped my training from 1 hour to 2 hours every day and over 1 month I've increased 10 fold in my technique and power. This is all alongside my strength training of 1 to 5 reps max and it works


1

Weight training is fantastic for martial arts training, but you have to do it with a goal in mind. Ask yourself which areas you need to improve strengthwise, which areas have muscles that you will use (directly or indirectly) in practicing your techniques. Also, if you do a sport like Taekwondo, keep in mind that, contrary to popular belief, while muscles ...


1

I have found that strength training once a week and power endurance once a week alongside BJJ, Thai boxing, boxing and JKD concepts helps a lot in my fitness and strength; however, if I do strength or power endurance more than once a week, I slow down and burn out. Everyone's body reacts differently; spreading my training out over a period of time makes a ...


1

This man is probably utilising Getsumei No Michi (Moonlit path). It sounds much more mystical than it actually is though. It is simply a mental technique for heightening your senses naturally (as opposed to utilising psychotropic drugs). It's not a spiritual exercise so much as an exercise in "daydreaming" until you reach a state of heightened sensitivity. ...


1

I just bought some adjustable 10lbs ankle weights to improve the speed of my legs. Currently i can properly perform the stances, shifts, and misc. kicks and footwork with 7-8lbs on each leg. When i train with the ankle weights i also hold a 10lbs dumbbell weight in each hand, which improves me hand speed. This type of training also helps with the main issue ...


1

A tip no matter what kind of movement you are trying to do fast is to relax the muscles when executing the move then tens your arm/hand when making contact with you opponent so that you don't break you arm. You can't go fast if you tense your muscles when kicking or punching. This is explained here in a more scientific matter: The main issue addressed ...


1

I think reaction time drills might suit you better. Like Dave said, spar copiously, but with intent. Work on conditioning yourself to not think, to kick. This is a basic overview of what you are trying to overcome, but its lacking on the practical ways to train it. I will see if I can dig up some actual exercises.


1

Spar copiously. Regardless of the physical attributes of speed, your reaction time will largely be determined by how quickly you notice your opponent moving in, and how well your nervous system is trained to react with that technique in that specific situation. No training outside of sparring can give you that kind of natural reaction.


1

If you have a partner to work on this with, below is a set of drills I've found particularly useful for improving footwork, speed, and timing (which, I'd agree with Sean, seems like a large part of what you're asking about). You and a partner face off as you would for a sparring match, and one of you takes the role of aggressor. The aggressor steps forward ...



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