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7

While "back kick" is mostly synonymous with "side kick" in most martial arts, there are styles that do have a back kick that is subtly but very significantly different than a side-kick. This is perhaps what you're picking up on. In a side kick, you will raise your leg up and inwards, chambering the kicking leg in a position whereby the kicking leg is ...


7

Former black belt in Taekwondo here. This turned out to be a pretty long explanation. Sorry about that. But in this case, I wanted to educate rather than just inform. Judging by the question, this sounds like a young student and someone just beginning Taekwondo or karate. Back when I was 13 years old just beginning Taekwondo, I would have loved for someone ...


5

I'm aware of Tang Soo Do and at least some forms of Karate having a spinning heel kick, but beyond the Korean martial arts and Karate, I'm not aware of any (though it seems likely that there is at least a related move in Capoeira and some styles of Kung Fu). In Alex Gillis' A Killing Art (a heavily sourced origin of modern Taekwondo), Gillis relates an ...


4

If you feel like there is a greater chance of injury for 540 degree kicks over 360 degree kicks, that's good, because there is a greater chance of injury. If you want to develop techniques like a 540 degree spin kick, you have to understand this is a fact of life. The physics of rotation is a good place to start. Your moment of inertia is your resistance ...


4

The 540 kick causes a lot of problems for people who are confident with the 360. This is often due to starting with the opposite leg forward to the 360. As backwards as it may sound - practice the 180 kick this will get you more used to jumping with the kicking leg at the back. Progress that to a 360 reverse turning kick with the opposite leg. This will ...


4

If you are fighting for real then you skould not kick higher than your opponent's balls. Reason is you're legs are to easy to get a hold of. Bruce Lee's high kicks and spin kicks are just for show. They look cool but if he used them in a real fight he would get his ass kicked. There are plenty of targets to hit below the balls, especially the knees. i would ...


4

They're both effective at their intended purpose. Just to be fair though, TKD also has a spinning back-kick, which is much closer to the JKD spinning kick.


4

I am a TKD instructor. That, and I used to do Latin. Ballroom, HipHop and Freestyle dancing. The combination of these things helped me pick up the techniques fairly intuitively, but the point is that you need to practice advanced kicks in stages: first learn to spot when you do a turn, in other words: don't swing your head, Keep your head on the target like ...


4

I think this nicely illustrates the mental conflict between drills and practical application. Consider one of the key points of a high spinning kick (taekwondo in my case but the commonality with hapkido is obvious): a high spin draws your upper body down and away from your target. Obviously, the movement of your upper body will differ based on flexibility ...


3

So far as my knowledge reaches, I can only answer the first part of your question. Yes, there are many arts which practice the spinning kick. My favorite: Capoeira. The "back spinning heel kick" is generally known as "Meia Lua de Compasso"—variations may apply. The "back spinning hook kick" is known as the "Gancho"—again, variations may apply across schools ...


2

In many ways, what comes natural to us may not be natural to others. And vice-versa. As such there will be techniques you have to learn and teach that might not be great for you, but will be for your student. When it comes to the spinning techniques, my "grand-sensei", if you will, was a natural at them. My direct sensei much less so. And I am even less ...


2

Hook kick is very beneficial as both a "stealth technique" and if you have bad aim with a side kick. Start by throwing a side kick that misses the opponent such that your foot is in front of his head (heel points to his head, toes point to the audience). If the side kick was high enough, and far enough from his head, he probably blocked the kick with a low ...


2

Everything you say is fairly accurate. There is one very interesting further use case, which expands on your idea of balance and muscle coordination - If you think of that sequence of movements as two-player drill, you can begin to examine it in a different light. Theoretically: this particular low-spinning heel strike might be a follow-up to a high parry ...


2

The techniques you describe are two separate techniques in Taekwon-do, at least in ITF Taekwon-do. The spinning heel kick is called bandae dollyo chagi and the spinning hook kick is called bandae goro chagi. Since Hapkido is a Korean martial art it may have its roots in Taek Kyon which as far as I know was mainly a kicking art which was also one of the ...


2

Moon Hwan Lee set up a taekwondo school in Australia in the '70s, and it's grown independently since (under his direction) - notably not incorporating many changes which happened in Korea during the late '70s and '80s. We have a kick which we call spinning-hook kick or spinning-heel kick which is identical to the backspinning hook kick described. The heel ...


2

I'll just modify my answer from the linked question: I am a TKD instructor. That, and I used to do Latin. Ballroom, HipHop and Freestyle dancing. The combination of these things helped me pick up the techniques fairly intuitively, but the point is that you need to practice kicks in stages: first learn to spot when you do a turn, in other words: don't swing ...


2

I'll take a stab at this for you since there isn't an answer yet.... The first thing I'll say is that in the case of a side kick, moreso than any other type of spinning kick, the spin isn't about generating extra power in the kick, it's simply about opportunity and changing the direction of chambering the kick. For all of the following discussion assume ...


1

As a MMA practicionner with 20 years of combat sports, here's my 2 cents/ideas : kicking practice helps keeps legs strong, FLEXIBLE and AGILE (very important) the fact that 'they are rarely used' does not mean u can't use them if your good enough not to get caught when throwing them (therefore you really need to practice) A kick can be as effective as ...


1

The only real value in learning the mechanics of big, spinning, haymaker attacks is being able to accurately gauge an opponents telegraphs and punish them accordingly. Mechanically speaking, these techniques tend to be slow and overpowered. Thus, their practicality is low for use against a non-compliant opponent. Plus, it is always, always, always a bad idea ...


1

Some are spinning to face backwards and kicking with toes pointed down, hips pointed away from the target. Others are spinning 3/4 of the way around and then essentially doing a side kick, toes and hips pointed to the side. Is one of these more correct? Or are these two distinct kicks. From the perspecitive of any given style or school, whether one is ...


1

I dont know about JKD but in Taekwondo, there are many effective round kicks like one of them is called "Touch Back" which directly hits the face of opponent by sole of foot and the other kick is known simply as round kick in which opponent is hit by the heel of foot. Also there is a kick called Hook which hits chin of the oppenent. Moreover there is ...


1

I'll admit that I don't follow Steve's explanation of the difference on the spinning kicks, so I won't address that. There's also this video where they discuss another perceived difference between the two. Namely, the teacher is suggesting that all TKD (or, as he says it, Karate) back kicks require a full 360 degree spin, and are therefore slower, albeit ...


1

My understanding is that this was a technique used in Hwa Rang Do. Since the founder of the modern system also was part of the organizing group in Korean Hapkido, it's easy to see how it could have been shared there and spread outward.



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