Hot answers tagged

7

In general you will do a lot of things in training that may not be directly applicable in a fight. This does not mean that they are not helpful. For example: what is the likely practical fighting application of a press up? This can also extend to Stances - some stances are designed to work your leg muscles and increase your balance. My experience comes ...


6

Freezing a movement and taking a still image of it is only useful if you can see the movement that came before it and the movement that comes after it. This image you've given us can be anything, because we can't see what came before and what's coming after it. If you're assuming that it represents a "fighting stance" or a position that you hold while ...


5

Is it generally expected in martial arts systems that all training stances/positions (horse stances, front stances, drop stances, etc.) will have direct fighting applications? Generally expected... No. In reality. Yes. All stances have fighting applications. All movements in kata or forms have direct fighting applications. They may not be immediately ...


4

It's not a starting position. It is a defence against a kick. The rear arm has caught the opponent's leg and it is hooked over it, the front hand is pushing him over backwards. You would need to see the full sequence of movements in the form to understand how the position is used. In karate the stance is called "manji-uke" and it has a direct equivalent in ...


4

Is this a realistic start position in a fight? No, not at all. Instead you think of this as a finishing position. That particular position could be anything, including but not limited to: an arm bar knife hand strike to a nice vulnerable spot (like the neck or the mastoid process) a grapple that is leading to a hammer fist Personally I never ...


2

The picture is used on the cover of Winning Karate by Joseph Jennings. My guess is that that stance is from some kata, and as such it could be completely reasonable. But, your critique is of the utility as a general ready stance for fighting, and you're inviting us to join in... As far as that goes, you're right - it would be terrible if used as a general ...


2

The stance typically referred to as "goat-clamping stance" in Wing Chun is Yee Jee Kim Yeung Ma, typically translated as "two character abduction horse stance". The "two character" refers to its resemblence to the character for two in Chinese. "Abduction" refers to the drawing in of the knees which apocryphally is similar to clamping a goat between your ...


2

For Historic European Martial Arts (HEMA): Just about every stance or guard is meant to be used in combat. While some of them may seem odd, like Ochs/Ox (or Finestra/Window); ... or the reverse grip (from German Longsword): ... or may seem to leave you vulnerable, like Long Tail (notice how he's looking to our right, his left); ... or just don't ...


1

Being rooted means you can absorb/resist some force without moving. A dancer can be balanced on pointe, but this is not a good stance for rooting because they are easily unbalanced. Balance is necessary but not sufficient to be rooted. Fighting stances will have the feet separated and knees bent to help absorb force. But this is not the end of the story. ...


1

Your Basic stance, that you learn first in Boxing is with a balanced weight distribution of the legs. But if you fight, the weight distribution changes and you need to learn punching and defending also in those situations. The weight distribution can also be more towards the front or towards the back foot. Here is a nice article using the term axis to ...


1

Please consider checking your stance structure and posture by working from the center out and down to your feet. Kokutsu is hard because you need ankle flex and tons of leg strength. Make sure your tanden is sucked up and forward slightly. Use your stomach muscles to pull your butt under you. Keep it there for all stances. I always have a slight flex or ...


1

Reverse punch relates to the fact that it's the side opposite the front leg which is punching. Doesn't matter if it's forward or backwards. Both forward and backwards are normal and you should be able to use both. When stepping forward the force will primarily be on the punch, the hikite pulling hand would only be clearing the opponent's guard, and isn't ...


1

This position (approximately) occurs in the first form ("discipline form") of the Shaolin Qi Shi (seven animals) style of Kung Fu that I am learning. In this form, the hands are held in eagle claw rather than closed (the position is therefore known as "low eagle"), and the upper hand is closer to the face, but it is otherwise the same. The position occurs ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible