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23

What you have heard is at least partly wrong. Heavy weight lifting can be about increasing size, but it is more often about directly increasing strength (it's part of the distinction between a bodybuilder and a powerlifter). The expression is that "no one gets bulky by accident." I also have never seen any reliable evidence that it makes you slower at ...


15

Kicking has four parts to it: flexibility, technique, focus and ab's. For the flexibility, I have found PNF stretching to be quite beneficial. This is a form of stretching that uses periodic resistance/contraction followed by relaxation to achieve a deeper stretch and excellent long term results (here is a reasonable Youtube example). Of course flexibility ...


14

Tom Kurz notes: Taekwondo master Hee Il Cho, famous for his powerful and precise jumping kicks, says, “Weight lifting can help athletes in any sport, including the martial arts. The more strength and size you have, the better you will perform. If two people weigh the same, the one with more muscle can hit harder." You should listen to Hee Il Cho. He ...


9

One of my favorite exercises in that area is holding a side kick against the wall. You execute a side kick with your foot against the wall, and then you shift your weight forward until your foot no longer slides down. This will only work if you hold your leg at least in a horizontal line. Once you have some balance you can work on height. If you get your ...


9

Honestly, the best thing you can probably start with is not going to be a martial art at all. Instead, try the following: Strength Training One of the biggest culprits in back pain, knee pain, etc can actually be corrected by increasing the strength of the surrounding muscles. I had hip issues and years and years of martial arts did not fix my hip issues, ...


9

A good way to get gi / kimono specific grip training is sling your gi / kimono top around a pull up bar or a tree branch and use that to do any number of exercises, such as Pull ups, grip the lapels and hoist yourself up Grab lapels and pull yourself up Grab lapels and bring your lower body up and wrap your legs around the gi in triangle position Just hang ...


9

Classifying tai-chi-for-health What are we talking about when we talk about forms-based tai chi? Evaluating the practice as an ignorant outsider, it's essentially a slow dance. There are a number of one-footed balancing postures, deep lunges or otherwise low stances, and opportunity to stretch the limbs as well as flex and extend. In addition to the ...


7

First, I think your coach is wrong: weightlifting, properly done, is excellent for boxing. Second, I think your assumption that your legs are strong is wrong: running is not a particularly good way to develop leg strength compared to methods like barbell squats and deadlifts. Third, I think punching with weights in the hands or on the wrists is a bad idea ...


6

We did an exercise at my first Judo club that seemed to help with grip. We would hold our arms out directly in front of us and then alternate between making a grip and having our hands as open as possible. Basically, like gripping thin air, but repeatedly. A very simple exercise, but it seemed to help. How many times we repeated was a measure of how many ...


6

Because the motions are performed slowly, tai chi ends up being its own conditioning exercise. Holding stances increases overall stamina as well as helping find root. That said, at one point I'd taken to doing stressed forms, where I'd wear a weight belt, arm and/or wrist weights, used leg bands, etc. depending on what I was trying to work on. Other than ...


6

"Not tai chi" Many tai chi teachers espouse physical development through means other than tai chi, and reserve tai chi for the refinement of skill. Similar to pre-war Aikido (wherein students were required to have significant expertise in other arts such as karate, judo or jiujitsu), tai chi strength and conditioning is often mixed with other styles of ...


6

National Geographic did a fight science segment on martial arts kicks, featuring karate, tae kwon do and muay thai against capoeira. I was a little disappointed, in that they had Simon Rhee (karate) doing a front kick. Just because of the angles, motion and muscle involvement you will never get a front kick that outperforms a round or side kick. (Especially ...


5

Slugster's great post forgot to mention relaxation. Conditioning to build strength and improve flexibility is very important. However, fast, fluid motion also requires you to be relaxed and it's harder to achieve relaxation of the large leg muscles than it is of the arms. One drill I give people is to get a pile of cushions at a height they can ...


5

This seems like a tough question to answer to me because "health" is a vague term and it begs to be compared to other things. I would think one advantage forms based tai chi would have over the other things you mentioned (running, strength training) is an additional mental discipline / meditative aspect that would contribute to mental health and well-being ...


5

First of all, always be cautious when taking medical advice from the Internet. It's best to consult a doctor or physiotherapist before taking any actions. Any training where you train one particular muscle group may cause a muscle imbalance. That is why a good instructor will let you train various muscle groups. I'm no Taekwondo expert, but I don't think ...


4

A fun way to work on balance (and endurance) is to stand in your kick stance, and draw out the alphabet with your kicking leg. This doesn't really work your actual kicking technique much, but it will work your balance and your endurance and strengthen all the muscels needed for kicking, and therefor your balance and technique will improve.


4

I have vague memories of simply trying various kicks in slow-motion, trying to keep my balance, until I could do most of them without losing my balance. Alternatively, try to just lift one foot off the ground from a "feet together" standing position. The foot only needs to be lifted until it's no longer touching the ground. Try to keep your balance. After a ...


4

When talking to people about this specific problem in class, I usually surprise them with my comment: "stop standing on your heel." If you are light on your heel but strong on the ball of your foot you have several advantages: You are using your calf muscles. They're very strong and confidence inspiring. You have less rotational friction than a planted ...


4

First off I wouldn't worry about accidentally turning in to Arnold. Body builder forums are littered with people struggling to gain mass. It's much tougher than you think and you'd have to be REALLY focused on gaining mass and not just strength to even have much of a chance of that happening. While strength is not always paramount in many martial arts, it ...


4

Take a newspaper (remember them?) and page by page, crumple the paged from flat paper to the tightest ball you can make with one hand.


4

Aside from the strength training for grips, there's also certain technique involved in grips. For example, when you hold the right arm sleeve of your opponent, make sure you grab the part right under his elbow, and grab it tight, so he is unable to move his arm properly. At the same time it's hard for him to release his harm since you can control his arm ...


4

Taekwondo instructors generally don't have the kind of knowledge you're talking about with regards to identifying muscle imbalance and improving it. For that, you need a personal trainer, someone who's knowledgeable in muscle building and proper exercise form. Taekwondo itself can develop some muscle imbalance, but in general this should be a pretty minor ...


4

If BJJ is around, you should do BJJ. If grappling of another kind is around--wrestling, judo, SAMBO, et cetera--you should train that. But if nothing's available, you should do general physical preparation with a slight emphasis on BJJ's specific requirements. General Strength For instance, you'd want to do some kind of general strength (not bodybuilding!) ...


3

Tai Chi. Any kind. Possibly even any teacher should do. TaiChi is neat, because of the general focus on smoothness. The movements must be carefully orchestrated and done not only with the minimum effort possible, but also with efforts to relax. The only way to relax fully, over time, is going to include fixing the posture, going as far down as the bones ...


3

We are taught to practise in bjj to use a gi (uniform) you can hang it on something strong and practise pulling up if you do not have a gi to use for this excercise you can use a belt a martial art belt if possible. It helps to work your arms and you will be able to hold on with that grip when the opponent is resisting or moving.


3

There are a couple of things that you can do to help. Go hang from something Basically either go outside and find something overhead or get a pullup bar and hang from it. You can make a progression out of this, going from a pullup bar to one-hand on a pullup bar to hanging from a rope. The basic idea is that if you want to improve your grip strength, ...


3

i've always liked getting a bucket or small garbage can and filling it full of uncooked rice. you can do what we call rice grabs by jamming your fist into the rice while grabbing and releasing handfuls of rice. cheap and effective.


3

Get Strong First If you're weak, there's no point in trying to get a strong grip. You're too weak for it to matter. Instead, you should first work on getting your whole body strong, and then--only then!--focus on developing your grip. Mark Rippetoe has some words for people lacking general strength who want to increase strength in one particular area. From ...


3

Your goal to increase your grip strength should focus on exercising your forearm muscles. There are several strength exercises and tools you can use to work out the different muscles in your your forearms. Tennis Ball or Hand Grip As @stslavik stated in his comment, you can grab a tennis ball and squeeze it to your heart's content. When squeezing the ...


3

There are a few things you can do to improve grip strength. Like everything else, sport specific drills are best, training the closest to the actual activity your trying to improve. on that note: Like others have mentioned, throw a gi over a bar and do pull ups with it. My favourite, because it works all sorts of different parts of your upper body, and ...



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