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9

The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program initially included an element called Body Hardening. It involved hitting the location of primary nerves. The Radial and Ulna nerves, Femoral and Sciatic nerves, and abdominal strikes for the Celiac Plexus. The result was that, after repeated impact over a long period of time, the nerve would become damaged, such that ...


5

It sounds like you're talking about the scientific form of pressure points (as opposed to pseudoscience involving "chi meridians"), namely spots on the body which allow for direct stimulation of nerves and muscles to cause a great deal of pain or sometimes even muscle paralysis. As with defending any vulnerable part of your body, they key principles are a) ...


2

While pressure points may exist as sensitive spots on the body that can aid in both fighting and healing, touching or pressing on them probably can't kill you. Still, use pressure points as a way to help relax your muscles, reduce tension and stress, and overcome painful headaches. http://www.medicaldaily.com/truth-about-pressure-points-which-ones-can-kill-...


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Epinephrine is known to dull pain for a time thus allowing someone not to feel as much pain as they actually have. However, it is temporary. I suspect, but have no evidence, that this is what allows competitors to take blows and not register the pain till later on. A lot of training require "soaking" of blows thus both reducing the energy dumped into the ...


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In my experience, there are a few reasons why professional/trained fighters do not feel pain as much as a normal person. Higher pain tolerance They are constantly taking hits and their bodies have become accustomed to pain. Fighters know in which situations pain is unavoidable and they may have developed a different response to it. Also, by mentally ...


1

Your body turns off you ability to feel pain when you're in a serious fight. I once fought with a broken collar bone. It was a bit tender, but I didn't feel any pain until the following morning. And for me getting hit hard in the face was just a bright explosion of light and a moment of disorientation. If it was a particularly hard strike, you may feel the ...


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The important thing is that there are two phenomena limiting your performance: Physical limits -- injury or pain so severe that you CANNOT continue. Psychological limits -- a combination of fear, surprise, stress, or self-preservation instincts make you REFUSE to continue (including fleeing, surrendering, collapsing, dialing back your own intensity, etc.) ...



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