Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

Boxing is probably the most effective "real world" martial art you could do. Especially if you cross-train in greco-roman wrestling. Bruce Lee said something to the effect that you learn more in one year of boxing and wrestling than 10 years of eastern martial arts.


3

You may want to look into some styles of escrima, kali, or penjak silat. These tend to have a lot of striking with some use of grappling and locks. These also tend to deal with weapons (knives, sticks) as well as multiple opponents, which are extra bits that are critical to self defense that often get missed in sports-focused training. Boxing gives you an ...


2

The answer to this question really depends on: What training you have Where you are fighting (what terrain, obstacles, etc. is around you) Every form of self defense has different options they specialize in. Jujitsu and Judo folks will get around the person's back and lock them up. Some folks will catch a thumb or get a wrist lock. Boxers will play ...


2

My Answer Today Given my judo and lifting training right now, I feel comfortable defending against throws by an untrained opponent. I feel less confident trading strikes. Therefore, I would stay outside striking range, maintaining distance using footwork plus an occasional leg kick, front kick, jab, or push kick as appropriate. If the attacker persists I ...


2

Epinephrine is known to dull pain for a time thus allowing someone not to feel as much pain as they actually have. However, it is temporary. I suspect, but have no evidence, that this is what allows competitors to take blows and not register the pain till later on. A lot of training require "soaking" of blows thus both reducing the energy dumped into the ...


2

There are various options that you can take, each with its own merit. Wing Chun and/or Tai Chi is a good option but it may take some time to properly learn the techniques. If you have a long term plan this is a good option though. Wing Chun does include kicks, but it is mostly low kicks. Aikido or Judo are also good options. These though focus less on ...


2

In my experience, there are a few reasons why professional/trained fighters do not feel pain as much as a normal person. Higher pain tolerance They are constantly taking hits and their bodies have become accustomed to pain. Fighters know in which situations pain is unavoidable and they may have developed a different response to it. Also, by mentally ...


1

The important thing is that there are two phenomena limiting your performance: Physical limits -- injury or pain so severe that you CANNOT continue. Psychological limits -- a combination of fear, surprise, stress, or self-preservation instincts make you REFUSE to continue (including fleeing, surrendering, collapsing, dialing back your own intensity, etc.) ...


1

Your body turns off you ability to feel pain when you're in a serious fight. I once fought with a broken collar bone. It was a bit tender, but I didn't feel any pain until the following morning. And for me getting hit hard in the face was just a bright explosion of light and a moment of disorientation. If it was a particularly hard strike, you may feel the ...


1

Boxing is pretty effective in real life and has that 1 hit knock-out power. That being said, you should also look into Wing Chun's or Tai Chi's techniques of 'push hands'. Basically they are 'arm trapping' techniques that can be used to lock opponents arm, preventing them from hitting & blocking your strikes. Aside from that, they also integrate throws ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible