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9

Kenjutsu is the skill of using the sword, divided into various styles by ryuha (roughly, "schools"). This can include skills such as drawing (iai) or engaging (battou), as well the disarming of an armed opponent (shinken shirahadome or muto dori). Generally (though certainly not in all cases), kenjutsu is one component of a greater curriculum within a ryuha ...


8

There are quite a few historic manuals linked from ARMA's page of manuals. The majority are pre-17th century, but there's a good dozen from that period. As to schools, my understanding is that practically every fencing master would claim his/her own style.


8

Major categories that I am aware of (expanding slightly on Sardathrion's comment): Iaijutsu (居合術) and Iaido (居合道) are the art of drawing the sword. Iaijutsu, theoretically, prefers more practical application while iaido is closer to an internal martial art, but you'll find schools under both names that exist along a bit of a continuum. Kenjutsu (剣術) is ...


7

I've studied iaido for five years, and practiced a variety of styles under one teacher (that's how much my words are worth). In general, parries, blocks and deflections are done with the side or the back of the sword. It provides a very convenient yin/yang balance to the movements, where you can draw from your opponent's strike and smoothly deflect it, then ...


6

In general yes, it's better to start out with a light weapon as you have to learn the forms and techniques first, without being concerned about injuring yourself with a heavy or real weapon. Usually you would learn the techniques with a wooden version of the weapon while at the same time learning how to strengthen the arms, wrist and fingers in style and ...


5

Krabi Krabong the tradtional weapons art from Thailand has a panoply of arms, including different shields. The shields are usually combined with offensive weapons. During a fight/show the participants often switch weapons/shields or pick up weapons others dropped. Thus many combinations are possible.


5

Okinawan kobudo (weapons training) has a short-spear and shield combination called the tinbe (shield) and rochin (shortspear). Purportedly, the shield was made of a tortoise shell, which is now illegal, causing modern versions to be made from plastic. The tradition of Okinawan weapons is often associated with Okinawan and Japanese karate but it is also ...


5

I don't think there are any major umbrella iaijutsu organizations. The All United States Kendo Federation also supports iaido and you'll sometimes find (for instance) Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu or Muso Shinden Ryu instructors among the local kendo sensei. I used to study kendo and iaido in the Pacific Northwest and I thought the quality of the instruction ...


4

It is definitely best to start with a light weapon at slow speed. You must give your body time to adjust to different movements and you must give your brain time to adjust to different techniques. When using a light weapon you are able to cheat (using improper techniques) so by going slow you provide yourself with the time to make conscious choices about ...


4

I've actually learned more (in longsword) from a heavier weapon than I have from a lighter weapon. The key with longsword is to learn how to use the handle as a lever, and nothing teaches that like weight. It's very easy to tell when you're brute forcing a cut, as opposed to levering it with weight. Using a light sword, it's possible to do things that ...


4

First off I think it our choice of trainingweapon depends on whether you want to start practicing on your own, or join a club. If you are planning to join a club, I'd say wait and see what they are using. Some clubs prefer steel other nylon wasters. This might save you the costs of new/additional gear ;). Also, and this might be different from club to club, ...


4

Your question may be answered more generically as thus: What is the difference between -do and -jutsu? (with the exception of judo and jujutsu) -Jutsu, grossly, means 'technique'. It means something applicable, practical, extremely concerned with getting results. -Do, grossly, means 'path'. It has much stronger ties to a lot of other aspects of life, ...


4

Sorry if this is a vague answer, and I don't know the first thing about the Seido karate style, but I remember an instructor (I can't remember what style. Kajukenbo, perhaps?) at a martial arts camp once telling me that they only taught weapons at black belt level to avoid weapons bias. The idea was that a practitioner should be fully proficient in empty ...


4

It all comes back to the question: What are you trying to do? If you're training in sword fighting, then use a sword. Just repeat the same sword cut over and over again. Try to go as fast as you can without losing accuracy. Repeat. In some amount of time, your forearms will tire. When they tire so much that either you're starting to slow down or you're ...


3

I don't have any references, only anecdotes from instructors I've trained with, so please do not mistake this as historically accurate information. The picture you show appears to be a variation on the 9 Ring Broadsword. This is supposed to have been a training weapon. The 9 Rings on the back of the blade provide a sound that assists the student in ...


3

Japanese martial arts traditionally do not block. The theory is Evade and Strike. An easy way to consider this is to look at the footwork. In Aikido, your hanmi is not a strong stance to block, but it's a great stance for moving and evading. With this mindset, I have trouble believing that there is a proper "Block". I can't think of any time I've been ...


2

As far as French manuals go, I know of only one from the late 16th century, entitled (deep breath): Traicté contenant les secrets du premier livre sur l'espee seule, mere de toutes armes, qui sont espée dague, cappe, targue, bouclier, rondelle, l’espée deux mains & deux espées, avec ses pourtraictures, ayans les armes au poing por se deffendre & ...


2

Many ninjutsu and related arts like To Shin Do have weapons classes open to all from the beginning, some even incorporate weapons training into regular classes as well. Look at your friendly neighborhood band of ninjas to see. :)


2

The exact answer would depend on which specific styles/lineages your talking about. (And there I am not able to provide specific info.) But a general answer would be the difference is the meaning of 'do' versus 'jutsu'. Iaido would be a "way"; practicing for self-betterment being the more primary intent. Iaijutsu would be "martially effective"; practicing ...


1

Practising sword play will improve your strength. Other exercises will help too. In the past I have found the most beneficial for hand strength to be finger tip press ups, pull ups and kettle bell use. All of these rely on hand strength. It is important to remember your body as a whole, bearing in mind that for for every contraction there is an expansion ...


1

Discalimer: I'm a novice in strength and conditioning, and I know just about nothing about sword training. General Strength First Activity-specific strength training is not a good idea until the student has already attained a basic level of whole-body strength. Therefore, instead of focusing on sword-specific strength training for specifically the arms, ...


1

Umm, not an expert but a few castles and armoury museums I've been to the medieval training swords were heavy (compared to the dao, jian, katana and other training weapons I've used). I suggest you try asking on http://www.thearma.org/ and if that doesn't help http://www.aemma.org/ (with sound turned off FFS)


1

Likely the most significant difference you'd see is that Iaido is practiced as a stand-alone art, while Iaijutsu would be one component of a Ryu (school/style) that has a larger scope. It's unlikely you'd find someone who practices Iaijutsu who doesn't also know Kenjutsu, but you could quite likely find someone who practices Iaido who doesn't know Kendo or ...



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