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18

Mind Maps The BJJ community is big on mind maps, which are close but not an exact match in your search for ontologies. For instance, Aesopian has this one: This is not surprising, since the entire concept that set BJJ apart from judo was the idea of an inexorable flowchart: Takedown Pass guard Mount (using a broad definition of the term--not ...


13

See the translation of Taekwondo entry in Japanese Wikipedia. According to this article, in 1940s during the Japanese rule of Korean Peninsula, Karate (空手) was taking hold under the name Kongsoodo (공수도, 空手道) and Tangsoodo (당수도, 唐手道). To backtrack on these namings, we need to understand the origin of Karate. Sakukawa Kanga (佐久川寛賀) from Ryukyu Kingdom ...


11

What style of TKD? ITF, WTF, ATA, STF, etc? I would suspect that they are probably WTF, and their bounce has to do with the style of sparring that they train for. TKD sparrers in general use their feet a lot, and there is a lot of switch stance, spins, aerial kicks, things of that nature, so the requirement is to be light on your feet. Watch any WTF or ...


11

Rulesets determine skillsets. Tactics are determined by the "battleground" (read: competition setup). If a style focuses on competition that doesn't allow foot-sweeps or clinching, and kicks are scored higher and more frequently than face punching, your fighters will end up looking like Olympic TKD: hands at the sides to deflect body kicks, facing sideways ...


10

tl;dr: The key to comfort in the air is learning how to fall. There is no One True Answer to building this sort of confidence. Instead, I'm going to try to give you some specific tips that I've shared with students in class. Some of these suggestions have worked for some of those people: your mileage will vary. How to be comfortable jumping around? ...


10

I'm going to be very precise with my answer here. Your technique will remain the same, your kicks and punches should still be the same as when you practice them. What does change though is your approach to your opponent so that you can deliver that technique. Because your opponent is taller, you will have more issues than it just being harder to reach their ...


10

The primary change is that daredevil / suicide moves now lose all interest. Jumping up and hitting the top of the head Spinning kicks, in particular the spinning hook/reverse/something kick to the head super-lunge-punch All these moves, and more, are now begging for punishment much more than before, when a judge might decide to call a point and stop the ...


10

Some of the answers on the following questions may be helpful: What qualifies a school or business as a legitimate martial arts system? How important is lineage when it comes to credibility or trustworthiness? What characteristics should I look for in a sensei? Some of the danger signs I would look for in what people call a "Belt Factory": Either ...


10

Sorry I'm not able to give a more academic answer to your question. As a former black belt in TKD and a bit of a martial arts history buff, I took an interest in this question myself at one point in my past. Here are my observations and thoughts on the matter. Taekwondo forms used to be entirely from Shotokan karate. This comes about because many Koreans ...


9

How you re-enter the school will depend on the school and instructor. Ask their advice, and be up-front about how much you've forgotten and your current level of fitness. Don't pretend you can walk into a school with a preconceived idea of what belt you'll be wearing and what level you should be training at: that is ultimately your instructor's decision. ...


8

[NB: It is entirely likely that you will have no idea what I'm talking about here. Unless you have training in Bujinkan Ninpo Taijutsu, this will all be foreign to you, and this is purposely so. This is based on content from my own training manual, and is meant to aid students in their continued study of taijutsu and is not for everyone.] From the ...


8

I can give a Hapkido perspective on this, since at least at my dojang we are taught that you keep your fists closed until you reach 1 dan, at which point you can open them (and do so more and more as you go up from there). We relax it a bit for blocks (we don't teach hard blocks until 9th kup), but not for attacks. There are two major reasons we give for ...


8

I have been in TKD and Martial arts for over 40 years. I have a master rank in TKD. I also have a traumatic brain injury. This happens very seldom but the head gear in any sport does not protect you from concussion as the violent movement of the head causes the injury. I learned a long time ago to move my head away from a punch or kick. This minimizes the ...


8

First, bear in mind that this will differ from dojang to dojang. Depending on your association (WTF or ITA for example) there may be a list of techniques you will have to master for each belt. If you are not affiliated with an association, your teacher will have a checklist of things he wants you to learn before each belt. Ask your teacher what the ...


8

Given that women are extremely well represented in Gymnastic competitions, I think it's fair to say that women are quite capable of doing aerobatic flips with kicks. Edit to add: Other than maybe standing up and p***ing into a moving shot-glass, there isn't anything that women aren't capable of.


7

The situation of TKD is very similar to that of Shotokan karate (and indeed since TKD comes mostly from Shotokan karate). In Shotokan, you will occasionally see some weapons being taught, such as the nunchaku, tonfa, sai, and sword. But those weapons aren't in Shotokan's syllabus. Each instructor had to learn them from someone who knows Okinawan or Japanese ...


6

In rapier we would encounter this problem all of the time: You'd go up against opponents in sparring that were significantly weaker or stronger than you all of the time, and you have to learn to not walk over the weaker opponents so that they could still have a good game and learn something while working on your technique. First, though, let me say that ...


6

First I'd talk to your instructor and see what his/her philosophy is for returning students. They will be the best guide for what fits in their class. In my (Hapkido) class we tend to throw you back in at your belt level for everything, partly because a big part of being at that belt level is teaching, and teaching is a way of learning and getting back into ...


6

Edited for the differences portion of the question: For the most part, TKD is TKD is TKD. A front kick in WTF looks like a front kick in ITF looks like a front kick in ATA, etc. Differences in execution are relatively minor, even if you go from TKD to a Karate flavor, the techniques are pretty much the same. The differences between TKD and Karate are the ...


6

I think that style is less relevant than Sensei. I don't practice either TKD or karate, but I believe that the most important factor in determining whether you'll take the kind of blows you want to avoid is the instructor (and the senior students). Watch a few classes. In particular watch juniors sparring and look for evidence that they're being observed ...


6

Tai chi can be best described as "mediation in motion." It is more slow-moving than tae kwon do and focuses more on internal energy development whereas tae kwon do is more external. However, that does not mean that tai chi itself will not provide a workout for you. It may not be as strenuous or physically demanding as tae kwon do, but you will see some ...


6

In short, grading every 3 months as a lower Gup is fairly normal. You will begin to be able to tell if you're in a "belt factory" if you look to the higher Gups and Black Belts and wonder how on Earth they have X Belt. I'm an instructor for an ITF-based Taekwon-do school and the approach that our umbrella organisation follows is to have gradings four times ...


6

Answer: Absolutely 16 is a great age to begin TKD training and you have plenty of time to become proficient enough for competition, provided you are in good physical condition. Since you mention that you practice ballet and gymnastics, your athleticism makes you an excellent candidate for TKD competition training. I would argue that someone could achieve ...


6

Yes, it's possible, but if you focus on that you're likely to be disappointed. Most people who start (any martial art, or anything else difficult for that matter) tend to drop out after a short time, or simply not have the time or natural talent to rise to elite competitive levels. And that's ok. It seems a little early to be caring about national level ...


6

Former black belt in Taekwondo here. This turned out to be a pretty long explanation. Sorry about that. But in this case, I wanted to educate rather than just inform. Judging by the question, this sounds like a young student and someone just beginning Taekwondo or karate. Back when I was 13 years old just beginning Taekwondo, I would have loved for someone ...


5

According to The 1995 Condensed, 1999 Condensed and 2008 15 Volume (as well as the original 1985? 15 Volume) these are Hooking Blocks (16 and 19 preformed as the first half of a Connecting Motion). Online resources back this up as well, such as http://chk-taekwondo.com/id28.html which is an excellent, excellent resource. My own writeup on the patterns is ...


5

The main difference between WTF and ITF is WTF is South Korean and ITF is North Korean. The forms are different, kicks are the same. Attitude in ITF may be geared more towards self-defense and WTF is certainly geared more towards sport sparring in most dojos. ITF Wiki WTF Wiki Actually to better answer your actual concern, would it be difficult for ...


5

An open hand requires less tension, which means faster movements. Once you have acquired the awareness/control over your hand, and your fingers aren't all over the place, it is to your benefit to modulate the tension and change your hand's position. I know that when I spar, with closed hands, I feel like I have much fewer options available, and I feel like ...


5

I agree with the other answers about the technique varying, but wanted to add one more: Time and dedication. We like to say that a "black belt is a white belt who didn't quit" (this is not unique to us, it's a fairly common expression). We also talk about how when a new person enters the dojang it is impossible to tell if they will be one of the ones who ...


5

Women are under-represented in martial arts generally, not just in tricking. It isn't that they aren't well-suited. I think this is a culture problem more than a physiology one (though physiology does play a part). The culture problem I'm speaking of is mult-faceted, but boils down to the overwhelming masculinity in martial arts culture. Women can feel ...



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