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11

See the translation of Taekwondo entry in Japanese Wikipedia. According to this article, in 1940s during the Japanese rule of Korean Peninsula, Karate (空手) was taking hold under the name Kongsoodo (공수도, 空手道) and Tangsoodo (당수도, 唐手道). To backtrack on these namings, we need to understand the origin of Karate. Sakukawa Kanga (佐久川寛賀) from Ryukyu Kingdom ...


9

Sorry I'm not able to give a more academic answer to your question. As a former black belt in TKD and a bit of a martial arts history buff, I took an interest in this question myself at one point in my past. Here are my observations and thoughts on the matter. Taekwondo forms used to be entirely from Shotokan karate. This comes about because many Koreans ...


8

I have been in TKD and Martial arts for over 40 years. I have a master rank in TKD. I also have a traumatic brain injury. This happens very seldom but the head gear in any sport does not protect you from concussion as the violent movement of the head causes the injury. I learned a long time ago to move my head away from a punch or kick. This minimizes the ...


7

The situation of TKD is very similar to that of Shotokan karate (and indeed since TKD comes mostly from Shotokan karate). In Shotokan, you will occasionally see some weapons being taught, such as the nunchaku, tonfa, sai, and sword. But those weapons aren't in Shotokan's syllabus. Each instructor had to learn them from someone who knows Okinawan or Japanese ...


7

Given that women are extremely well represented in Gymnastic competitions, I think it's fair to say that women are quite capable of doing aerobatic flips with kicks. Edit to add: Other than maybe standing up and p***ing into a moving shot-glass, there isn't anything that women aren't capable of.


6

Answer: Absolutely 16 is a great age to begin TKD training and you have plenty of time to become proficient enough for competition, provided you are in good physical condition. Since you mention that you practice ballet and gymnastics, your athleticism makes you an excellent candidate for TKD competition training. I would argue that someone could achieve ...


6

First, bear in mind that this will differ from dojang to dojang. Depending on your association (WTF or ITA for example) there may be a list of techniques you will have to master for each belt. If you are not affiliated with an association, your teacher will have a checklist of things he wants you to learn before each belt. Ask your teacher what the ...


6

Yes, it's possible, but if you focus on that you're likely to be disappointed. Most people who start (any martial art, or anything else difficult for that matter) tend to drop out after a short time, or simply not have the time or natural talent to rise to elite competitive levels. And that's ok. It seems a little early to be caring about national level ...


5

Women are under-represented in martial arts generally, not just in tricking. It isn't that they aren't well-suited. I think this is a culture problem more than a physiology one (though physiology does play a part). The culture problem I'm speaking of is mult-faceted, but boils down to the overwhelming masculinity in martial arts culture. Women can feel ...


5

First of all, always be cautious when taking medical advice from the Internet. It's best to consult a doctor or physiotherapist before taking any actions. Any training where you train one particular muscle group may cause a muscle imbalance. That is why a good instructor will let you train various muscle groups. I'm no Taekwondo expert, but I don't think ...


4

In its most basic sense, just let the scale be your guide. Weigh yourself at the same time under the same conditions every day (Such as first thing when you get up in the morning), and watch the trends. If you notice that your weight is creeping up, you need to either increase your cardio/workouts a bit or cut back on the calories a bit. Be aware that if you ...


4

It's going to depend on your instructor and art, and how they promote weapons within the art. Traditional Korean weapons include spear variations (traditional spear, one similar to a naginata, trident, etc), bow, sword variations, a nunchaku variant, and the staff. Whether or not these are part of the curriculum at your dojang is variable. For example, many ...


4

Taekwondo quite literally translates as the art of kicking and punching. You can certainly stylise that translation, but that's what it means. The reason TKD doesn't focus that much on weapons is probably because it's quite a modern art, having been founded in the 1960's ( or was it the 1950's?) when people were shooting at each other with firearms, as ...


4

Yes, I agree with Alan's answer that women are quite able to perform at a high level in gymnastics, so tricking is not a problem for them physically. And I agree with others that there are generally more men in martial arts than women, so that is a part of the explanation. Then there's the fact that there really aren't many "tricking" classes offered, ...


4

Taekwondo instructors generally don't have the kind of knowledge you're talking about with regards to identifying muscle imbalance and improving it. For that, you need a personal trainer, someone who's knowledgeable in muscle building and proper exercise form. Taekwondo itself can develop some muscle imbalance, but in general this should be a pretty minor ...


4

I agree with the other answers about the technique varying, but wanted to add one more: Time and dedication. We like to say that a "black belt is a white belt who didn't quit" (this is not unique to us, it's a fairly common expression). We also talk about how when a new person enters the dojang it is impossible to tell if they will be one of the ones who ...


4

Former black belt in Taekwondo here. This turned out to be a pretty long explanation. Sorry about that. But in this case, I wanted to educate rather than just inform. Judging by the question, this sounds like a young student and someone just beginning Taekwondo or karate. Back when I was 13 years old just beginning Taekwondo, I would have loved for someone ...


4

I am a TKD instructor. That, and I used to do Latin. Ballroom, HipHop and Freestyle dancing. The combination of these things helped me pick up the techniques fairly intuitively, but the point is that you need to practice advanced kicks in stages: first learn to spot when you do a turn, in other words: don't swing your head, Keep your head on the target like ...


3

When I tested for 1st Dan, I was asked to perform Gae Baek, which is the blackbelt pattern (kata for all the karate philistines - JK). In addition to that, I was asked to perform two additional colour belt patterns at random. In my case, Won Hyu and Hwaorang. Then came the demonstration of breaking techniques. I was allowed to choose my own technique and ...


3

This in why symmetry is exercising is so important, but another factor that most people don't know about and which even martial arts schools that teach it, don't emphasize it's importance enough, is that of tendon strength. This is achieved through practicing your stances in a low position such as horse stance, front bow stances and other holding ...


2

Based on my training, open handed blocks are acceptable and even encouraged, but these may be different then what you are thinking of. We use an open hand to push the blow aside by striking the side of the incoming fist, the wrist, or the forearm. This is certainly something which requires having built up a sense of timing, but it can be quite effective. The ...


2

By reading the The Encyclopedia of Taekwon-do written by General Choi Hong Hi, the founder of Taekwon-do, one would find out that the sine-wave is a main characteristic of Taekwon-do and is part of the "Theory of power" that characterizes the style. The sine-wave emphasizes relaxation on the upward motion and the contraction and explosion on the ...


2

Regarding the BJJ Ontology. I started putting one together a few months back. You can check it out through the WebProtoge project named BJJ - Brazilian Jiu Jitsu at http://webprotege.stanford.edu/ It's very similar to what Dave Liepmann has put together in his mindmap. The BJJ Ontology I started is described in the OWL (Web Ontology Language). I pulled ...


2

My kids currently train under UKTF, which follows ITF guidelines and techniques. Will this cause problems if they move to a WTF trainer? They aren't quite at black belt yet, so I'm hoping that if they do transfer it won't be too much of a problem. It depends on your kids, really. It will take them time to get familiar with the WTF style of Taekwon-do. I ...


2

For WTF/Kukkiwon taekwondo the black belt forms: koryo (virtueous man), keumgueng (diamond and mountain), taebaek (bright mountain), pyongwan (a vast plain), sipjin (life and longevity), jitae (struggle and aspiration), chonkwon (heaven), hanseu (water) seem to be paths towards Ilyeo (Buddhist enlightenment). There may be some incidental references to ...


2

Is there anything I can do to increase the power of my turning kick? Make sure you have the full rotation. For a roundhouse, your standing foot should be close to 90 degrees at the end of the kick. You can check this by going up against a wall and extending your leg out to kick (using wall to balance as needed). When it reaches the full extension, ...


2

Certainly kids that started off earlier than you would have an advantage over you. But the good news is that Taekwondo divides competitors a number of ways, depending on how many people are competing: sex (m/f), rank (beginner, intermediate, advanced / black-belt), age (children, junior, adult, senior), and weight. Chances are, you'll compete very locally ...


2

I like Juann and Wudang Kid's answers, but lets put some perspective on this. Every person that walks, for the first time, in a dojang or dojo wants to know what it takes to become a black belt and what it takes to know all the crazy things they see on TV or in the movies. Never mind the expense of promotion and some belt-factory schools, the question's ...


2

MMA events, unlike the rest you mentioned, are generally not tournament-based, but rather based on planned-well-in-advance ring (cage) fights between pairs of specific fighters. Maybe an MMA promoter near you can schedule you a fight. Before entering a full scheduled ring fight, it would be a good idea to go to an MMA school and ask to have an MMA-rules ...


2

For a second there from the way you worded your question, I thought you were basically without any knowledge of martial arts and just wanted to try entering a tournament just for fun to see how you would do. That would be hilarious! But I see from your bio that you're at an intermediate level in Taekwondo. That's better. Okay, so as for open tournaments in ...



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