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12

You are probably missing kuzushi (balance breaking) and/or atemi (strikes). Both serve the same purpose: to distract your opponent so that they worry about something else rather than their wrist. Then, applying a wrist lock becomes easy (read: easier). The ninth technique of the goshin-no-kata shows just what I mean: you have a lapel grab which is ...


12

Primary and secondary grappling skills Wristlocks and most other standing joint locks are almost always secondary grappling skills: one must already be able to dominate using basic gross-movement wrestling skills like pummeling, grip/hand fighting, foot-sweeps, hip throws, body locks, and so on. Part of the problem is strength: standing wristlocks and ...


8

It's a delicate balancing act; if you don't push and encourage your son, he might not achieve his full potential. If you do push and encourage him, you may end up putting him off martial arts altogether (which is obviously a bad thing, but perhaps even more so for you and your son!) Could your son attend both lessons? That way he would have one class where ...


8

Is there a way to escape/ defend yourself from tornado kick? Ummm... yes. If there wasn't, all martial arts would only practice tornado kicks, but in fact relatively few martial arts use the technique. Those kicks are horribly telegraphed, which means the defender have a lot of warning and time to decide what to do to defend or counter-attack. ...


7

Your kid is 7 years old. And he's just a beginner, approaching intermediate level. Of course he's not going to be good at stuff. Whether it's sparring, forms, breaking, recalling terminology, leading the class, etc. It's to be expected. This is absolutely nothing to worry about. Trust me, he will improve. Your main concern is about him wanting to quit ...


7

Karate and Tae Kwon Do have a lot of overlap. So many of the techniques will be very similar. However, the slight differences cause more issues as you get to a higher level. The best way to improve at something is usually to practice that thing. For kicking start low and make sure you are getting the technique right (it is more important that you generate ...


6

There's no one "technique" here, there's a lot of techniques and principles and all of them are absolutely dependent on the situation and specific. Run Being outnumbered, and against knives, escape is the best option. If you cannot leave the vicinity, the next best option is to get something between you and your attackers - preferably walls and a locked ...


6

You shouldn't need to train in a different art to improve your flexibility. A fellow black-belt in TKD improved her kicking through regular stretching; she had a routine that she completed (possibly still completes!) several times a week. I'm afraid I don't know what her routine was, so I can't describe it for you; equally, the stretches that worked for her ...


6

Of course you should quit! From what you said, you are neither having fun nor learning anything. I know you are young but your time is valuable. There is no point in wasting your time with people who do not appreciate you and refuse to teach you. The shame is theirs. Find another martial art class to go to, one where you can learn, grow, and have fun. If ...


6

The setup for one of these kicks is ridiculous, and I question if there is even a significant power difference between one and a well delivered roundhouse or side kick. I feel good footwork is the best defense, since anything except a stationary target is going to foil the effectiveness of execution. I'm a big, aggressive fighter, and I always step inside ...


5

You can watch other people sparring to see how they deal with front-leg kicks; either watch 'live' at tournaments, or search for videos on YouTube. However, I watched a video of a gold medal final from the London Olympics and couldn't really see what their approach was! I train in ITF TKD, which normally has a different approach to sparring (more use of ...


5

I was in your situation - I was a programmer (now a dev manager) and I put on 20 lbs in 2 years sitting around eating badly. However, I did have the advantage of a life of sports (including nearly 30 years in martial arts now) and a college degree in kinesiology to help me turn that around. You are already doing TKD twice a week, and jogging in the morning. ...


5

A good instructor will start your training with body conditioning and basic techniques. It is unlikely you will be thrown to the on your first day. As you become proficient in your skills, you may be invited to begin sparring with a partner (who should be matched to your size and skill level). Have courage, or as they say in Korean, Yong Gi. You will ...


5

Your shin can break if you kick someone very hard and they block just right and all conditions align against you. You can break your hand punching someone, even aiming to soft targets like the ribs. You can blow out your knee throwing someone with ouchigari. You can get concussed into unconsciousness taking someone down with a double-leg if they time their ...


5

WTF stylists can do a few things to improve their self-defense capabilities. Get those hands up! WTF tends to focus so much on kicking that they forget they have hands. Hence, they stop protecting their heads. Practice non-point sparring. That is, stop your opponent with the power of your technique rather than stopping the match on touch. Continue ...


5

In addition to Mike P's answer, I would expand the talking to the coach and your son about it. The coach should be able to give you advice and tailor his teaching of your son so that he feels better. It's his role after all. I would do this before the session so he has time to prepare and it does not come as a shock. Forewarned is best! Your son should ...


4

For the first 3 to 4 years, you'll never fight anyone who is of a higher belt than yourself, so they won't be much better than you. Your opponent will be just as scared of you as you are of him. And after 4 years, you'll be a black belt and you'll be able to do all the same fancy things with your legs.


4

Yes. Dozens. Probably hundreds. Tomiki Aikido regularly practices defense against knife attack; students are required to defend against knife attack at every test. Students are also required to defend against multiple attackers at every test. There are several kata that focus on defense against knife (Koryu dai san no kata in particular includes at ...


4

As you have correctly guessed, it will be difficult to monitor your progress (or potential back-sliding) without feedback from partners and instructors. This is why Martial Arts are practiced in group environments (man sharpens upon man). Nevertheless, solo practice is vital, even when you have a regular class that you attend. My advice for you would be ...


4

I had similar thoughts. The issue is complicated. The best stretches are not what we would normally do on the dojo floor. They might work fine if you started as a toddler, and did them daily for the rest of your life, but they seem less effective as an adult. So, find a partner, and do "active stretching". There are loads of videos on the web for this ...


4

There is no such thing as a "World Master" rank in any of the official Taekwondo federations that I'm aware of. However, there is the WTF, the World Taekwondo Federation. A master rank in the WTF might be misinterpreted as "World Master". Maybe that's what you're seeing? Also, I just did a Google search on the term, and I found out there quite a lot of ...


4

I think BJJ is the best because it generally doesn't involve striking, which probably isn't good for kids. Wrestling is another great sport for kids.


4

I'm a 5th Dan in Karate and have been teaching for about 20 years. My advice would be to let him work at his own pace. Martial Arts are a journey, they take a lifetime to master. He has plenty of time to learn and shouldn't be pressured or forced to learn at a pace that is not his own. If you want him to stick with it, then it has to be something he enjoys. ...


3

Taekwon-do comprises of Fundamental Movements Dallyon (Maintenance of equipment, conditioning) Patterns Sparring Self-defence You can certainly work on 1, 2, and 3 on your own. Sparring is possible, but only Shadowing works because you don't have a partner. If you know how to correct yourself (and all Black Belts should be able to do so), check ...


3

From a metabolic point of view, when you ingest the simple sugars (primarily glucose) present in sodas you get a spike in insulin production. The insulin mediates the uptake of the glucose by your cells where it is converted (either aerobically or anaerobically) into energy plus various waste products (CO2, lactic acid). The problem is that your metabolism ...


3

I'd suggest looking at alternative uniforms - you guys are ITF? Must be dozens you can order online, some of which may be a heavier or more starched canvas material that won't cling to you so much or show sweat. I sweat a lot too - some materials are just better than others. I can't see any particular reason to stick to the same brand that suits the ...


3

I preferred cycling to running, but that's not important. What's important is that you do interval training (search on Google for examples). You'll want to do lots of muscle conditioning too. Use lighter weights, and go for more reps and sets. You want to build lean, toned, fast-twitch muscle. I can't give you a specific workout because I don't know you, ...


3

Honestly, I am not that good at sparring. I'm good but I am better at form and kicking. I think depending on the school you go to, you will be able to find very supportive teachers and friends. it is unlikely that you will be the only person who is starting for the first time. From my experience, teachers like to tease and will poke fun but you will find ...


3

If you mean from a grammatical perspective, they are the same. They are synonymous. But if you mean from a style POV, it depends on what you mean, so some clarification is needed. Typically, Kukkiwon universally refers to their forms as "poomsae", so when Taekwondo-in hear this, they almost always assume you're referring to Kukkiwon's poomsae. ITF is a ...


3

Conditioning is one part of kicking safely with a shin to make it stronger gradually by damage/repair periods. However conditioning also teaches how to kick with your shin on an acute angle that will not hurt or break the shin. Also, the lower part of the shin should be used, close to the instep. This part is not as likely to break and some strapping or shin ...



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