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7

I don't believe there is a "traditional taekwondo black belt bo form". The Kukkiwon (at the Foreign Taekwondo Master Training Course in 2013) says there are no weapons in Taekwondo, but some schools add them to boost their curriculum. I had a quick look in General Choi's encyclopaedias (the 1965 one and the multi-volume set) and can't find any references ...


6

Former black belt in Taekwondo here. This turned out to be a pretty long explanation. Sorry about that. But in this case, I wanted to educate rather than just inform. Judging by the question, this sounds like a young student and someone just beginning Taekwondo or karate. Back when I was 13 years old just beginning Taekwondo, I would have loved for someone ...


5

First some background on Taekwondo. There are several organizations that certify ranking in Taekwondo. They all kind of look like each other, because they share the same exact roots. They branched off for different reasons, sometimes political, sometimes having to do with the emphasis of various techniques over other techniques, and other reasons. But they ...


5

Yes, no, maybe... It all depends on what you mean by "appropriate". First, the themes and matters discussed in the book are suitable for an adult. If you were a teenager or child, things might be different but at 19 you should have the matturity to read whatever you chose. Second, should you follow the advice given (if any) in the books is up to you. I ...


5

In ITF Taekwon-do, the coloured belts are numbered from 10th kup (also gup) to 1st kup. Black belt grades are numbered from 1st degree (also dan) to 9th degree. In the organisation I'm a member of (P.U.M.A, in the UK), the colours used are: 10th: White 9th: Yellow stripe 8th: Yellow 7th: Green stripe 6th: Green 5th: Blue stripe 4th: Blue 3rd: Red stripe ...


5

What is the most effective method for the roundhouse kick? You've got a one-adjective criteria there, and a vague one: effective. Overall effectiveness might reasonably be defined as what helps you win reliably, or perhaps you'd prefer something less reliable if it meant the average or median injury you sustain is less even though the worst case ...


4

I am a TKD instructor. That, and I used to do Latin. Ballroom, HipHop and Freestyle dancing. The combination of these things helped me pick up the techniques fairly intuitively, but the point is that you need to practice advanced kicks in stages: first learn to spot when you do a turn, in other words: don't swing your head, Keep your head on the target like ...


4

First, it's normal to have hip soreness when beginning or restarting TKD. It's hard to say if you're causing yourself real injury, and as always I suggest you consult a physician if this is a real concern for you. Only you can really tell if the soreness/strain you're feeling is the normal soreness of training, or a sign of something serious. Monitor it ...


4

The official explanation is that you are backfisting someone in the face for great justice while simultaneously blocking a mid-section kick. Another explanation is that you're tearing someone's junk off. This is supported by the idea that the movement preceding it is a spearthrust to the genitals (it's not an inward knifehand block like many think). The ...


4

I'm guess that "Sockgate" is referring to this incident? There's a good description of the "SensorHogu" technology in this article. They use piezoelectric sensors, which is the use of crystalline materials that react to impact with releasing a small burst of electricity. They require a sharp impact, which matches with what one wants for a tournament setup. ...


4

It all depends on what you want to achieve. Want to become a boxing champion? Go do boxing. Want to be TKD pro? Go practice TKD. If you just want to be able to fight off some bullies practice (almost) any martial art, most of them are good and bullies/hooligans normally do not have a rich background of martial arts. Also, it heavily depends on the ...


4

The question asks which is more effective: Doing MMA or doing multiple different martial arts. There are a couple of different interpretations about what is meant by "effective" in this context, however. First, it can refer to how well all the different styles of martial arts are integrated into a cohesive system whereby all the techniques work together and ...


4

The Kukkiwon splits all the countries in the world into two categories, depending on whether that Member National Association (MNA) for the World Taekwondo Federation (WTF) in that country controls over 70% of Taekwondo groups and instructors. Those that do are considered to be in the "1st Category" and recommendations can only be made by the President of ...


4

Based on your age, there is no reason why you cannot. It won't happen for everyone, but if you did them at an earlier age then you should be able to do them again. But make no mistake, it is going to take some sustained and regular training to achieve it, and if you stop stretching once you've achieved the splits then you will gradually lose your flexibility ...


3

Kukkiwon has no official Bunkai (Boonhae in Korean). So I would say that this is a dangerous road to go down, trying to assign Boonhae to a system that specifically wasn't mean to have it. People doing this are guessing after the fact (and a lot of the founders have said there is no hidden meaning to the moves intended). Now, the previous martial arts that ...


3

I'm a Taekwondo instructor and I would disagree with your premise that "Karate style uses the balls of the feet to hit, by pulling the toes back, whereas the Tae-kwon-do’s style is by using the instep of the foot". We often use the ball of the foot, particularly when hitting something hard like bricks or boards. However, against soft targets such as the ...


3

Your club/school will probably have a promotional exam every few months, or every semester if it's a university program. That's a good time to watch (even if you are not ready to test) and get a good feel for what people have to learn and how good they have to be all the way up through the ranks, including dan ranks. (For a small school, you may have dan ...


2

My kids currently train under UKTF, which follows ITF guidelines and techniques. Will this cause problems if they move to a WTF trainer? They aren't quite at black belt yet, so I'm hoping that if they do transfer it won't be too much of a problem. It depends on your kids, really. It will take them time to get familiar with the WTF style of Taekwon-do. I ...


2

Yul-Gok Pattern The X-stance being described is move #36 on this page. A lot of times in application analysis, we need to look at the previous move and the next move to grasp the context of the application. The X stance/backfist could be read as a setup for a hip throw (yes, TKD has throws), while the turn to the supported block (move #37) could be read ...


2

Smartass Answer Here: TKD Belts Serious Answer Depends on the school/association. Some have over 10 colored belts before you even get to first degree black. Some have much fewer. An example: White Yellow 1st and 2nd Degree Green 1st and 2nd Degree Blue 1st and 2nd Degree Brown Black 1st Degree through 9th or 10th The fewer belts the school has, ...


2

The rule changes have already occurred. If you look at the last Grand Prix events put on by the WTF you will have seen octogonal rings instead of square. And a lot more punches were scored by the judges (as President Choue said, we'd have to award points for weaker punches to allow more to score as they obviously don't have the same impact force as ...


2

I've looked at a few of his videos on youtube... my impression (as an ex-taekwondo instructor who also studied hapkido for a few years, now doing kyokushin) is that his taekwondo technique isn't stellar but is certainly good enough to give a beginner plenty of useful direction for a couple years, after which they should be able to objectively assess what ...


2

As a Taekwondo instructor, I wouldn't recommend TKD if you're purely looking for self-defense. The reason is that you're not going to be able to defend yourself with TKD until you've at least achieved 2nd Kyu (Red belt). This is because for the first two or three years, you're going to be learning how to win competitions, so everything is going to be geared ...


2

I'll just modify my answer from the linked question: I am a TKD instructor. That, and I used to do Latin. Ballroom, HipHop and Freestyle dancing. The combination of these things helped me pick up the techniques fairly intuitively, but the point is that you need to practice kicks in stages: first learn to spot when you do a turn, in other words: don't swing ...


2

I'll take a stab at this for you since there isn't an answer yet.... The first thing I'll say is that in the case of a side kick, moreso than any other type of spinning kick, the spin isn't about generating extra power in the kick, it's simply about opportunity and changing the direction of chambering the kick. For all of the following discussion assume ...


2

I can't comment as I don't have 50 reputation yet, but unfortunately coltonon is incorrect. He says "eight official color belt ranks registered by the kukkiwon and the wtf" and that those ranks are certified and recognised worldwide. The Kukkiwon doesn't care about colour belt ranks and doesn't certify them. There is no system in place to get the ...


1

(Taekwondo practitioner for nearly 30 years, running a Taekwondo club) I would go with the others general advice on getting them started in a club under a qualified instructor. However, I understand there are places where either people are too far from a club or it's financially not feasible, so teaching them the very basics gives them something to work on ...


1

Here is a start: How to make a proper fist Front kick Straight punch Back stance Front stance From there you could build with back fist, hammer strike, round kick. There is a lifetime of learning right there. Keep working on balance, target/aim, power, speed, focus, kihap. Maybe don't teach side kick, as it is hard enough to learn how to do it right, ...


1

(from an ex taekwondo instructor... now practicing karate only) Taekwondo was spread very fast and wide with little "quality control", so what gets taught in different dojos can be very varied. I'm sure the first thing some WTF dojos would do is get them turning/roundhouse kicks on those little flappy pad things, but I'll just offer what we used to teach ...


1

Simple answer: the gup. So what the h&$@ is a gup? It's a taekwondo rank. There's gups and dans. My school has 8 gups. That is, eight official color belt ranks registered by the kukiwon and the wtf ( world taekwondo federation). We have other ranks, but only 8 are certified and recognized by 164 countries worldwide. Gups go in opposite order. ...



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