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9

9 to 12 months. Just a guideline. I say this time frame because, simply from experience, thats about how long - after regular and quality training - before a student starts to see some of their training take hold as instinct. But the question itself is fairly unsophisticated, and isnt answerable in a way that'd be relevant to any given individual. Its ...


8

Classifying tai-chi-for-health What are we talking about when we talk about forms-based tai chi? Evaluating the practice as an ignorant outsider, it's essentially a slow dance. There are a number of one-footed balancing postures, deep lunges or otherwise low stances, and opportunity to stretch the limbs as well as flex and extend. In addition to the ...


8

Chen-style has explosive movements (fajin), jumps, directional changes.. It is the style of Daiji closed to Bagua. The Yang style is more flowing, has bigger and more open postures (longer stances, arms open wider). It has a slow form and a fast form, thus separating concepts that are found together in the Chen forms. Wu style has a higher stances and ...


7

One application is to capture a punch. If you enter the puncher's space, there's an arm break and/or a relatively violent takedown. It can be very similar to some silat takedowns. It can be a deflection and striking/throwing entry without any capturing or breaks. One application Attacker steps in with a right-hand punch. Defender outward-deflects punch ...


7

Someone who is "rooted" to the ground is difficult to move or control and can use this property to move and control others more easily. It's all about body structure. Here is a video of a short demonstration of being rooted. Uprooting someone is when you break their connection to the ground or the structure that connects them to the ground so that they ...


7

You're probably wrong about not being able to find Tai Chi. You probably just don't know where to look. Google is a skill ;) Make sure your google-fu is strong. Tai Chi is a very popular martial art and it is taught in a lot of places. Check your local gym or fitness club. Don't try learning Tai Chi from the internet. There are too many ...


6

Because the motions are performed slowly, tai chi ends up being its own conditioning exercise. Holding stances increases overall stamina as well as helping find root. That said, at one point I'd taken to doing stressed forms, where I'd wear a weight belt, arm and/or wrist weights, used leg bands, etc. depending on what I was trying to work on. Other than ...


6

I would argue that there is no such progression. While push-hands may look like a "slowed down" version of sanshou, it is an entirely different exercise on its own. The only way to progress to sanshou is to start doing it. Edit: To elaborate, the practice of sanshou (or free form sparring if you like) is an integral (albeit rarely practiced) part of ...


6

"Not tai chi" Many tai chi teachers espouse physical development through means other than tai chi, and reserve tai chi for the refinement of skill. Similar to pre-war Aikido (wherein students were required to have significant expertise in other arts such as karate, judo or jiujitsu), tai chi strength and conditioning is often mixed with other styles of ...


6

Being rooted means having a stable center of gravity (CoG). Uprooting someone means to go under their CoG and take control of it. Once that is done, defeat, throw, project, lift are just possible courses to follow. This answer to a question about a seated Daito-Ryu technique makes allusion to it even by the wording used - the teacher takes control of the ...


5

This seems like a tough question to answer to me because "health" is a vague term and it begs to be compared to other things. I would think one advantage forms based tai chi would have over the other things you mentioned (running, strength training) is an additional mental discipline / meditative aspect that would contribute to mental health and well-being ...


5

Are you looking for the origin of Tai Chi? Or of the many different styles of martial arts? Or of martial arts in general? Martial arts have existed as long as people have been fighting. And as often as people have been fighting, people have been figuring out better and more efficient ways of fighting, and teaching these methods to others. There is no one ...


5

It depends on many factors. Tim Cartmell comes from one point of view (am referring answer given by Dave Liepmann), and from that point of view he is absolutely correct. I can imagine a Tai Chi teacher who'd teach you to fight with Tai Chi and you'd get proficient, certainly. There are many variables to take into account. I am here making the assumption ...


5

Tai chi can be best described as "mediation in motion." It is more slow-moving than tae kwon do and focuses more on internal energy development whereas tae kwon do is more external. However, that does not mean that tai chi itself will not provide a workout for you. It may not be as strenuous or physically demanding as tae kwon do, but you will see some ...


5

In general, you should be inhaling when raising the arms and exhaling when lowering them. This is taken from the 18 Lohan set which is where the 8 Pieces of Brocade was taken from. When inhaling when raising the arms, you are gathering the chi, when exhaling while lowering, you are sinking the chi to the build the root in the stance, then you have a solid ...


4

I've studied Yang style Tai Chi for two years. There are some very simple applications for Single Whip: In the images above, the guy is facing forwards, imagine if the attacker was coming from behind. You start in Wu Chi and when they try to punch the back of your head, you step backwards into single whip, using the whip hand to very subtly deflect the ...


4

There are many applications, depending on what part of the single whip sequence one looks at. There is hooking and pull-down and push with the right hand at the beginning of the motion. Then there is a potential albeit well hidden elbow strike when turning around. Then there is a combination of a ward-off, pull-down and push, the end of which can be seen ...


4

First off, the Chen village invented push hands, so what you see there is the way it is supposed to be played. I've pushed with some guys from Chen village, and real push hands is a lot closer to a combination of judo and sumo. Why do people have such a hard time accepting this? I suspect because its actually hard, and its a lot easier to spend your life ...


3

Although, both answers so far have made good points I happen to agree with, I would like to weigh in with an alternative albeit perhaps not so very popular answer. I would argue that by selecting just a small subset of the whole system, you are already forfeiting some of the benefits that the whole system can offer. Or to quote the words of Yang Cheng Fu ...


3

My teacher Scott M Rodell advocates weapons training in addition to zhangzhuang for general conditioning. When using real-weight weapons like wooden (or steel) jian or long spear, they provide the additional weight for a simple yet focused workout as well as great resistance to "push against" when applying fajing. Additionally, it is not unheard of to ...


3

This won't be a popular answer. The goal of taijiquan (太極拳) push-hands isn't to push the other guy off-center. That's a side-effect of the real training. The goal of taijiquan push-hands is maintaining no-mind even through disruption by outside agency. You are training for: Accepting flinch responses Noticing your attachment to the notion of getting hurt ...


3

Tai chi is about integration of the whole body and developing structure - ideally using every muscle in every move. Any strengthening "gym" type work will basically be about isolation of muscle groups, which kind of defeats the point unless you are addressing a specific weakness. In tai chi you should "throw away your hard strength". Doing specific ...


3

This answer is in reply to @Dave Liepmann's query, and is in support of Trevoke's answer. No need to upvote this one. Dave Liepmann asked, "So, unbalancing and locking, or unbalancing or locking?" This is a common way to frame this concept. When your body has not learned this stuff, your mind wants to put this into neat boxes because the underlying ...


3

If you're sedentary in a new city and looking for exercise, the best school to join is whichever one actually moves around vigorously that you will enjoy and stick with. Whether it's Tae Kwon Do, tai chi, yoga, lifting weights, or soccer doesn't particularly matter. Whether or not you sweat matters. Whether you like it and keep going matters. However, it's ...


3

Chris Chi asserts that seven stars refers to seven points of the body – head, shoulder, elbow, hand, hip, knee, foot – each can be used to deflect or strike. Alas, Chris Chi doesn't provide a graphic, and the seven star stance in my tai chi form is quite unlike the seven star mantis stance shown if I google for seven star stance. (Attempts to include ...


3

Part of this really depends on where you are learning, how often the classes are, how big the class is, and the curriculum and structure of the class. Given that you haven't mentioned what style of tai chi you are learning, the movements/forms, and what your instructor or class format is like, I can only draw so many conclusions. For instance, if your class ...


2

A few months to a year To achieve mastery in taiji it takes a lifetime, like in any art, martial or otherwise. But to achieve fighting proficiency should take less than a year. Similar to any other hard-sparring martial art, it should only take a few months to a year to attain a basic level of skill in internal martial arts such as tai chi. This is what ...


2

1. Static Push Hands The purpose is to teach you to let go with your hips and your back, to allow flow, yielding and redirecting of energy properly. In addition, of course, you are learning to apply every other Tai Chi concept. I've found that Roberto Sharpe's videos on Youtube are amazingly detailed. He explains things very well, and most importantly, he ...


2

Needle at Sea Bottom is a fave for fixed feet push hands. Personally, I dont like the move but have been on the receiving end enough to know its effective in competition. You can see it in this video at about 33 seconds in. The initial body and hand positioning is reasonably close to tournament and you can see the hip turn whilst sliding the weight ...


2

If you study at a school that does both "free fighting" (san shou) and "push hands" (tui shou), and you practice the form 60-90 minutes a day, and you go to class two to three times per week, it should take approximately 5 years to be able to fight at a medium level for self defense. At the school where I study they say that if you want to develop the ...



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