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21

For myself, the main criteria is not to do damage to the child's growth. Repeated strains on joints (wrist locks for example) and repeated impacts can have negative effects much later in life. Some aikido dojo will have a syllabus for under 18s, other will just refuse to train anyone under the age of 18. What adults do is not necessarily what a child ...


20

Traditionally, in times of war you teach the right hand. In times of peace, you teach both hands. I train in a Chinese school, and Chinese schools typically favor ambidextrous training ... if you have the time. In my case, I find myself freely using either hand in simple, day-to-day life tasks. This happens without thinking. I find that movements that show ...


18

Kids are fast. If you don't keep them occupied they will do something else: chatting, joking, bullying etc. While you may need to impose discipline from time to time, don't forget to work on the root cause. Try to be more engaging, here are some ways vary exercises a lot (this is not always the best thing to do) don't talk too much. (no long explanation, ...


17

Typically, the correct way to approach this is personally, away from the rest of the class. If you have a problem with the way an instructor conducts himself, then, if it's important enough to warrant being brought to their attention, going to them one-on-one and requesting a private moment of their time is proper. It's important to not seem combative or ...


15

Define "adept." You aren't going to find much in the way of scientific studies that are specific to martial arts in this regard. There are too many variables, and we encounter many of the same problems that the fitness community does. To add a data point, however: With my group's Hapkido, we're taught to use both because it is a self defense martial art ...


14

Positive energy and attitude. You want to find an instructor who is there, and doesn't have his upper belts teaching all the time. Sit in and participate in some classes, make sure you feel comfortable with the school and how the other instructors handle themselves and treat students. Too many times I've walked into a school and it's be constant yelling at ...


13

In my experience this is not a good way to learn, no matter how capable a teacher you are. I'm not saying that it won't work, just that the chance it being successful is very low. Any martial art takes a lot of time, patience and discipline to learn. Outside of the dojo these things can all be in short supply. Training at the dojo forces you to make the ...


12

I am afraid you are looking for a unicorn and you do not even know what a unicorn is. There's a world of difference between giving your daughter enough training to "survive" a date and her surviving walking back to base after crossing Mogadishu. No Nonsense Self-Defense is a good place to start looking at these issues but is by no mean exhaustive. As for ...


10

You should practice techniques on both sides. That being said, most of the time you're going to use your dominant side, so you should practice that the most, but more often than you expect, the opportunity is going to come up where a non-dominant side technique will allow you a decisive score or perhaps even a victory, so never discount the possibility. ...


10

Choosing a teacher can be very important, but as you are a beginner you don't have to be too fussy initially, you should be prepared to experiment and trial a few different schools. But personally I think you are looking at this the wrong way. There are a number of things to consider: the classes are only an hour long. This could be the result of a number ...


9

He should have great students. That is: you realistically have more chance of becoming like the students of a teacher rather than like him/herself. There are plenty of high-ranked senseis with bad students out there. They are very good at practice and have a great reputation, but apparently they don't get good results at teaching.


9

Sardathrion made some excellent points! I just wanted to add: every child is different, we have had kids as young as 4 in our jiu jitsu program, and some kids as old as 6 or 7 that couldn't handle the class. Of course we don't teach the small children any joint locks! Our main criteria for determining if a child is old enough to participate in the ...


9

When I'm teaching kids' classes, there tends to be 2 types of kids: the one that want to learn, and the one whose mom drops them off so they can have some peace and quiet. Those are the trouble makers every time! I tend to pair them up with a hard-working student; this helps keep them in line. At our club, pushups are traditionally the punishment for ...


9

First off, there's a difference between teaching and doing. Depending on the art you are in, there may not be a big difference (e.g. Aikido). In different arts, particularly sport or combative arts, there's a large gulf between being a good teacher and being a good practitioner (e.g. TKD). It's not impossible to be both, or find someone who can do both ...


9

I don't have medical studies, but I can at least point you in the right direction of what to look up, based on kinesiology and adult biology. Tendon Plasticity "Tendon Plasticity" (Viscoelastic tissue) - Tendons work somewhat like rubber bands - they have some stretch to them, but if you over-stretch them, just like a rubber band, it ends up loose and ...


8

They receive a letter grade for the class. It is participation based, and they have to demonstrate a few basic things at the end of the semester. You have a fundamentally simple solution: Use positive and negative reinforcement to encourage change. When they try, recognize it and encourage them. When they slack, ignore them. At the beginning of class, ...


7

To add one to the list of excuses: "If you can do it on your right side, you can do it on your left". This is, of course, completely false. The most simple analysis of this is playing catch, which most will acknowledge as a game of gross motor skill. Have someone lob a dozen balls to you, attempting to catch with your dominant hand; then have them repeat ...


7

Are there core characteristics one should look for? Affability. Quite simply, we learn more from teachers we like. We like people who are like ourselves, or rather, like the people we wish we were. Simply put, if there's something that we find particularly lovely about another person, we're more inclined to do as they ask and find interesting the ...


7

They can be. I don't know that they are universally, but a lot of schools/teachers seem to be willing to accommodate at least some degree of disability. I suspect that it would be something that could be asked of each individual instructor. In my school, at least, testing is a formality that takes place when the instructor judges that you are ready to ...


7

You will be able to tell a good teacher by evaluating the students. Students should be: Engaged in the class Proficient in the material for their rank (Assuming they aren't brand new belts) Of a wide variety of ranks (not all brand new or been there for years) If the students display the above, then the instructor is presenting the material in a way that ...


7

Obviously the instructor I worked with last night knows what he's talking about because, as I said, he is an accomplished fighter. This doesn't make him an accomplished teacher at all. During your travels you will encounter different instructors with differing quality. You need to recognise when they are either not the best instructor for you, or when ...


6

This is really a broad question (there are many kind of martial arts). Speaking of karate, I wouldn't reccommend training to anyone under 9, and even then the training should avoid fight (kumite). It should cover kihon and kata only. They lack the maturity to understand what they are learning and the consequences of their acts; they usually want to play; ...


6

Jiu-Jitsu fighter here. Bear in mind that the technique in question can play into this. For example, when escaping from a position where your opponent has a clear upper hand (such as the bottom of the mount), you're less likely to control which side you escape on; you have to look for openings and take what you can. If you're in a dominant position and ...


6

Have the adult conversation with the instructor in question. Let them know that you have some feedback from people that have left, that they felt that their introduction was too advanced for a novice and leave it at that. Don't put words in people's mouths but provide the constructive critical feedback. If they are upset at your feedback, you have a ...


6

As with any type of job, class or organization try and raise the issue in private in a one on one session. This will ensure that the instructor, owner or leader does not feel threatened or disrespected and become defensive or combative. It's important to try and not make them feel threatened or that your criticizing them. Steer the conversation into as much ...


6

I have trained with several people with disabilities. None of them wanted to be treated differently from the rest. We, as teachers, did not want to treat them differently. So they passed the same tests as the rest. But do let reason dictate things: Of course, we had to adapt some tests. If you do not have a right arm, it is impossible for you to have ...


6

Slugster's answer is a good one to read (I up voted it) but I am going to play devil's advocate. If you relationship is strong and there are no underlying issues, then it can work well. She can practice the things she learns in the dojo with you so she can improve her form. Remember to criticise the actions not the person doing them. the technique is not ...


6

In my experience as both a student and an instructor, I've found that there are advantages and disadvantages to both parties from all forms: Per lesson – Instructor: Advantages: Able to demand higher rates for the convenience. More flexibility in asking students not to return. Students pay or are not taught. Disadvantages: Students feel more free to ...


5

This is not scientific, nor a quote from a famous martial artist, but I've noticed during sparring that my seniors pick up very quickly on what is my dominant side and use it effectively to their own advantage. I would expect the same thing to happen in a prolonged real-life fight with an experienced opponent. Alternatively, in an emergency situation, you ...


5

From a street fighter. I'm right-handed, 6'1, and 160 lbs. Like the others I have no scientific facts to support my claims other than experience. In real fights, you are typically (if not the aggressor) in the position of defense; if you survive you win. If you are on the offense, total submission is required to call it victory. It has been my experience ...



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