Hot answers tagged

12

Odds are, if you're asking this question, you already have the feeling that you're not being compensated sufficiently for you. If you were totally ok with it, you wouldn't be asking, right? So now you have some choices: Accept it Maybe the practice and training you get is totally worth it and the money doesn't matter. There's a lot of smaller schools ...


11

First, men who know nothing about martial arts may see a woman leading the class and immediately think that they (the men) could beat up the female teacher. So they think there is no reason why the woman could teach them anything about fighting. Second, some men might not want to train with women at all (students or teachers), because it would be awkward ...


11

This is an age-old question about training in general. It's generalized as the "Breadth vs. Depth" dilemma. A "Depth First" training philosophy would prefer to train in a small number of things, but teach them deeply before moving onto other things. This way, you get really good at everything you learn, but you won't have a good understanding of the broader ...


9

Figuring out if he either wants to be there or is forced to go by his parents is important. If the latter, then there is not much you can do about it. He might get better if he has something that engages him but that can be hard to gauge if he is not mature enough to tell you about it. You can still try though. As a side note, as Mark suggested in a ...


7

I believe that you are grossly underestimating the amount of $$ being spent on utilities and rent and other expenses. I've looked at rents in my local (suburb of phoenix, arizona) area and the minimum I've found for a 1500 square foot space (not built out) is $4000 per month. Not including utilities, insurance and so on. So, as an exercise, lets do some ...


7

Yes, this is normal although not common. Grading are set to determine if the examinee has a certain skill set appropriate for said grade. If they have, they should pass. If not, they should fail1. Most, if not all, syllabus have a recommended time between gradings. That time is a general on average most students will be able to learn the skills for the ...


5

It's not unusual if the student has prior martial arts experience. Even in other situations, it may make sense. For example, if the student has natural ability and is training very hard, and the dojo generally attracts a crowd that trains less seriously and/or less often, it doesn't make sense to prevent the former student from getting stuck into more ...


4

Just focusing on the "How a woman can teach martial art for men?" aspect more than the "understanding why men might be uncomfortable" bit which has been well-covered in existing answers. Steve Weigand also shared some good ideas how to get guys in the door and stop them walking out before they've even got an impression of you as an instructor, if you do get ...


4

Because you have asked specifically about Chinese martial arts and have mentioned wushu, I think it's important to understand how what you want matches up to what is offered in the modern landscape of Chinese martial arts in the US. I would first distinguish between two categories: modern wushu and traditional martial arts. The two questions I would use to ...


4

You've got a pretty big list of goals there, and you can probably find a teacher or school that will hit 60% of them. Getting them all at once might be tough. That said, NYC has a pretty large martial arts community, so once you get into a decent school, you might find other schools or teachers who better fit your needs. Your Knee Your knee, actually ...


3

There is no simple answer to this question. The approach to teaching depends both on the students (age, experience level, fitness level), and on the immediate goals (general development, competition, self-defense, teacher development). The points I make below are mostly from my judo experience. Help students experience success early It's best if students ...


3

Of the methods I've used, by and far the most effective was to have undisciplined students go back to doing basic beginner techniques, while the rest moved on to other things. It might go something like this: The class is getting out of control. No one's listening. Kids are talking over their instructor and making the class look like a joke. Signal firmly ...


3

Most kids, unless they are really unaware, have at least some idea that they have issues. A lot of them already feel like failures because of it. Coming down hard on him (not saying that your are or will) is probably the last thing he needs. A few things I think would be worth trying: As soon as he arrives, give him a task to do (put up a piece of ...


2

Unfortunately a lot of martial arts is sold on machoism. Men who build their self image on machoism don't feel they can learn "how to be a man" (as opposed to, say, their martial art), from a woman. They may not say it, they may not even be self aware enough to acknowledge that's what's driving them, but it's true for a lot of men. When you add in the ...


2

Respect must be earned, not simply demanded. I have always had a problem dealing with mental illness. Sometimes people with mental illness tend to push your boundaries quite a lot (ex: OCD), where they have an obsessive compulsion to test you. I have never figured that one out. Other than that, boundaries are pretty easy to set and reinforce, and I ...


2

Quick Summary as this post is long: It is easier to keep focus when learning something if you aren't just trying to repeat it, but fully conceptualizing the mechanics, reasoning, and technique of a thing. Having the student realize the benefit of improved understanding and the downside of lack was also a huge help in getting past attention issues as it ...


2

I have a son in Karate who has a mild case of ADHD, so I can empathize with your situation. In general, I find that he responds well to personal, positive feedback. A gentle reminder when he starts making faces in the mirrors works out well. And, positive feedback when he does something correct will also help build a good rapport. I also recommend talking ...


2

I've trained in many martial arts schools. There have always been one or two individuals that didn't know their own strength or who simply had some kind of mental issue that caused them to scare everyone else in the class who had the misfortune of partnering up with them. And I'm not even talking about sparring. It could be a nice, smooth, flowing, ...


2

We can't answer your question The particular distinction that you've provided differs between systems, languages, organizations, and sometimes individuals. Since you haven't specified your organization, we can't even address why they consider "instructor" and "teacher" differently. More broadly, the reasoning may range from ceremonial titles (some styles ...


1

I can't think of any martial art I have studied which required me to do anything rougher than light-contact sparring with my instructor. Sex/gender shouldn't make one bit of difference when teaching technique. As long as the skills are there (both in the martial art and in effectively communicating/teaching said art), I don't think there should be an issue. ...


1

It's not unheard of, but it may or may not be a problem. Good reasons: a student has shown natural aptitude for both the technical skills, and understanding of the philosophy, to a standard beyond that required for the next grade. Perhaps they have trained previously at another club and achieved a high grade, then switched, and applied what they know to the ...


1

Well, as a student, I don't care about the gender of my instructor, just someone that really knows what they are doing and what they are saying. I think that some men believe that Martial Arts or Combat-Related/Self-Defense "stuff" can't be taught by a woman. It's just a mind matter, closed or open minded.


1

Teaching children is very different from teaching adults. Kids have shorter attention spans than adults, and they also have greater difficulty with delayed gratification. It's important to tailor teaching to the audience. For kids, designing a game to work on particular skills is very effective. The kids can focus on doing well in the game (immediate ...



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