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10

I don't have medical studies, but I can at least point you in the right direction of what to look up, based on kinesiology and adult biology. Tendon Plasticity "Tendon Plasticity" (Viscoelastic tissue) - Tendons work somewhat like rubber bands - they have some stretch to them, but if you over-stretch them, just like a rubber band, it ends up loose and ...


6

I think that when something is a sport, you obviously can't learn all the things, as someone who is better at something and is competitive, she/he won't teach you the best techniques as you could use that against her/him at some competition. Your assumption is wrong. Plenty of coaches teach all the techniques of their style, either because they're ...


4

Good question. Children are harder to discipline than adults, because they are more likely to push the boundaries, they are less likely to take responsibility for their actions, and they'll frequently have a parent who thinks the sun shines from their wazoo and their little prince/princess could do no wrong. As their new instructor you have to let them ...


4

There's a few things to navigate and untangle in your question, but the short answer is YES, there are martial arts out there that do this. Mostly it comes down to instructor rather than specific style, although obviously certain styles tend to be grouped around testing, you can find instructors who do not participate in that manner. Holding Back ...


3

there are no "secret" in martials art. do you really think that when you reach black belt, some weird man will come at you, hidden in shadows, and teach you a more powerfull secret technique that will allow you to beat the best of the world ? we arent in a bad '60 kung-fu movie ... There are techniques that aren't shown to white belt because these are ...


2

So you're looking for a martial art that 1) has no exams, 2) is taught completely without holding anything back from the student, and 3) is not a sport. There are actually many martial arts teachers that teach this way, sure. My recommendation is to look around and meet with all the different instructors in your area. Ask them if they have tests, if they ...


2

Tricky. I've never said this before in my life, but MMA might suit him - learn just enough of whatever else to defend himself until he can wrestle. Failing that, perhaps thai boxing - he'd learn to lift his legs to protect his knees, and even if his punches are easy to dodge, he can work on expecting that and bringing his elbows in to catch anyone ...


1

Capoeira! Well, just kidding. I think some big guy's grappling would suite him. Sambo, Greco-Wrestling, Judo... or maybe Keysi. Keysi seems pretty practical, and does not involve much kicks. Fit for brutes. but footwork from boxing might help him be faster.


1

He already has a great grappling foundation from what you've posted. I would think about going with a defensive martial art like jujutsu (traditional rather than brazilian). It will teach him enough defense to protect against low blows that are his weakness as well as how to get in close to the opponent so he can use his size to his best advantage. Also, ...


1

Wrestling, Judo or BJJ are good options because 1) he's strong and 2) he's big, so it will be difficult to perform locks on him unless you have VERY long arms. He may also benefit from a bit of boxing so that he can learn to punch faster.


1

Tell him to go kyokushin karate.. Kyokushin will teach you that it isn't necessarily the biggest who wins. Proof of this can be seen during the all japan karate tournament. Apart from that mental training you will have tons of endurance and physical training just like muaythai or kickboxing. Since the gentleman already has grappling techniques. A martial ...


1

First of all the trainer has to have a respect. How the trainer can get the respect? I think that the best way to achieve this is by: your personal achievements (medals etc), great shape and attitude, great technique and eventually in randoris/sparings with attendees (if they can participate in this). That way of getting respect (and what follow this is a ...


1

From personal very rough but effective experience. I started Kyokushin when I was 7, in post USSR era. Our Sensei had many medals from competitions around the former USSR as well as some hardcore training in the army. His goal was to make champions and not run a "fitness club" as he called it. He made people who are falling behind do extra things like ...



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