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11

Odds are, if you're asking this question, you already have the feeling that you're not being compensated sufficiently for you. If you were totally ok with it, you wouldn't be asking, right? So now you have some choices: Accept it Maybe the practice and training you get is totally worth it and the money doesn't matter. There's a lot of smaller schools ...


9

There's a few things to navigate and untangle in your question, but the short answer is YES, there are martial arts out there that do this. Mostly it comes down to instructor rather than specific style, although obviously certain styles tend to be grouped around testing, you can find instructors who do not participate in that manner. Holding Back ...


7

I think that when something is a sport, you obviously can't learn all the things, as someone who is better at something and is competitive, she/he won't teach you the best techniques as you could use that against her/him at some competition. Your assumption is wrong. Plenty of coaches teach all the techniques of their style, either because they're ...


6

I believe that you are grossly underestimating the amount of $$ being spent on utilities and rent and other expenses. I've looked at rents in my local (suburb of phoenix, arizona) area and the minimum I've found for a 1500 square foot space (not built out) is $4000 per month. Not including utilities, insurance and so on. So, as an exercise, lets do some ...


5

A good instructor will start your training with body conditioning and basic techniques. It is unlikely you will be thrown to the on your first day. As you become proficient in your skills, you may be invited to begin sparring with a partner (who should be matched to your size and skill level). Have courage, or as they say in Korean, Yong Gi. You will ...


4

Good question. Children are harder to discipline than adults, because they are more likely to push the boundaries, they are less likely to take responsibility for their actions, and they'll frequently have a parent who thinks the sun shines from their wazoo and their little prince/princess could do no wrong. As their new instructor you have to let them ...


4

Because you have asked specifically about Chinese martial arts and have mentioned wushu, I think it's important to understand how what you want matches up to what is offered in the modern landscape of Chinese martial arts in the US. I would first distinguish between two categories: modern wushu and traditional martial arts. The two questions I would use to ...


4

You've got a pretty big list of goals there, and you can probably find a teacher or school that will hit 60% of them. Getting them all at once might be tough. That said, NYC has a pretty large martial arts community, so once you get into a decent school, you might find other schools or teachers who better fit your needs. Your Knee Your knee, actually ...


4

For the first 3 to 4 years, you'll never fight anyone who is of a higher belt than yourself, so they won't be much better than you. Your opponent will be just as scared of you as you are of him. And after 4 years, you'll be a black belt and you'll be able to do all the same fancy things with your legs.


3

Of the methods I've used, by and far the most effective was to have undisciplined students go back to doing basic beginner techniques, while the rest moved on to other things. It might go something like this: The class is getting out of control. No one's listening. Kids are talking over their instructor and making the class look like a joke. Signal firmly ...


3

Honestly, I am not that good at sparring. I'm good but I am better at form and kicking. I think depending on the school you go to, you will be able to find very supportive teachers and friends. it is unlikely that you will be the only person who is starting for the first time. From my experience, teachers like to tease and will poke fun but you will find ...


3

there are no "secret" in martials art. do you really think that when you reach black belt, some weird man will come at you, hidden in shadows, and teach you a more powerfull secret technique that will allow you to beat the best of the world ? we arent in a bad '60 kung-fu movie ... There are techniques that aren't shown to white belt because these are ...


2

So you're looking for a martial art that 1) has no exams, 2) is taught completely without holding anything back from the student, and 3) is not a sport. There are actually many martial arts teachers that teach this way, sure. My recommendation is to look around and meet with all the different instructors in your area. Ask them if they have tests, if they ...


2

Tricky. I've never said this before in my life, but MMA might suit him - learn just enough of whatever else to defend himself until he can wrestle. Failing that, perhaps thai boxing - he'd learn to lift his legs to protect his knees, and even if his punches are easy to dodge, he can work on expecting that and bringing his elbows in to catch anyone ...


1

First of all the trainer has to have a respect. How the trainer can get the respect? I think that the best way to achieve this is by: your personal achievements (medals etc), great shape and attitude, great technique and eventually in randoris/sparings with attendees (if they can participate in this). That way of getting respect (and what follow this is a ...


1

From personal very rough but effective experience. I started Kyokushin when I was 7, in post USSR era. Our Sensei had many medals from competitions around the former USSR as well as some hardcore training in the army. His goal was to make champions and not run a "fitness club" as he called it. He made people who are falling behind do extra things like ...


1

My club starts as young as four. Again, the overriding characteristic is the ability to listen to instructions and then carry them out. My club has a lot of primary school aged children, from prep (aged 5) and up. Most all of them do just fine. There are a few kids that are a little young for the age (if that makes sense) and they struggle and everyone ...


1

Capoeira! Well, just kidding. I think some big guy's grappling would suite him. Sambo, Greco-Wrestling, Judo... or maybe Keysi. Keysi seems pretty practical, and does not involve much kicks. Fit for brutes. but footwork from boxing might help him be faster.


1

He already has a great grappling foundation from what you've posted. I would think about going with a defensive martial art like jujutsu (traditional rather than brazilian). It will teach him enough defense to protect against low blows that are his weakness as well as how to get in close to the opponent so he can use his size to his best advantage. Also, ...


1

Wrestling, Judo or BJJ are good options because 1) he's strong and 2) he's big, so it will be difficult to perform locks on him unless you have VERY long arms. He may also benefit from a bit of boxing so that he can learn to punch faster.


1

Tell him to go kyokushin karate.. Kyokushin will teach you that it isn't necessarily the biggest who wins. Proof of this can be seen during the all japan karate tournament. Apart from that mental training you will have tons of endurance and physical training just like muaythai or kickboxing. Since the gentleman already has grappling techniques. A martial ...



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