Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

I am afraid you are looking for a unicorn and you do not even know what a unicorn is. There's a world of difference between giving your daughter enough training to "survive" a date and her surviving walking back to base after crossing Mogadishu. No Nonsense Self-Defense is a good place to start looking at these issues but is by no mean exhaustive. As for ...


5

The FBI compiles some data but not as fine-grained as you want. Beyond that I think you're SOL other than looking at guesses. My favorite such nonscientific approach is the "HAPV" (Habitual Acts of Physical Violence) idea formulated by Patrick McCarthy. He seems to describe things accurately in my judgment. That is to say, he alleges that the most common ...


5

While the answer can have all kinds of nuances, I suggest Krav Maga (full disclosure I practice it). My gf is 110lbs wet wearing boots, and takes Krav. She had no background in martial arts, and no real natural skill for it, but after training in KM for some time, she now has the confidence, knowledge, and skillset to adequately protect herself in many ...


5

Obviously the instructor I worked with last night knows what he's talking about because, as I said, he is an accomplished fighter. This doesn't make him an accomplished teacher at all. During your travels you will encounter different instructors with differing quality. You need to recognise when they are either not the best instructor for you, or when ...


3

The other answers here are great, but I have a couple more tips to add: Find a well-rounded school. A lot of arts are "do one thing, really, really well" types of schools. (If you know anything about MMA history, you'll know how well that mindset has gone over throughout the years.) Doing one thing really well is great, but street fight situations are ...


3

Find a school that fulfills the following requirements: spars at least a little hard your wife and daughter enjoy training at is near you Then be supportive--not hectoring, not demanding--with their training. All else is gravy. The goal here is to give them experience with either wrestling or hitting and being hit, if they want that. It's nice that ...


3

I'm in the "Why bother?" camp. I think such a conversation is largely pointless. It's got that feel of the old esoteric style of martial arts where awareness allows one to predict how the universe unfolds, and yes, there are many things you can predict, but I don't think its something you are going to teach to people, and I'm not entirely sure its going to ...


2

If we were sitting in a pub together and having a beer, my answer to your question would be "Why bother?". Of course there is more to the answer than just those two words. I understand and respect what you are trying to achieve by posing the question and trying to answer it. However I think you are trying to achieve the impossible. Your relationship to ...


2

Use science! First and foremost, one needs to understand something before one can demonstrate it. Chances are that everything you know about conflict is wrong or misleading. So, do some research first: What is crime like in your area? What does it involve? What are the common crimes and the uncommon ones? This is all statistics basically. You should be ...


2

Your logical fallacy is: Appeal to Authority! This is actually really common in martial arts; we assume that because our instructor has experience in a competition, but all this means is that the instructor was better in that match (and often we're simply taking their word on that experience). Nearly every art teaches to not fully extend limbs – the extra ...


1

At my gym, we have multiple specialist take coaches in specific areas that they excel at such as striking, kicking, wrestling , ground submission and etc etc. We usually focus on specific each day. We have 2 scheduled free fights, one halfway through the training and one at the end. During this, our free fight couch will usually be an experience / veteran ...


1

'Free Fighting' is an old term meaning MMA basically. Before the UFC had come to dominate all that was mixed martial arts, people called it by all kinds of names. Shootfighting, Mixfighting, Free fighting, etc. I would expect MMA techniques, and other self-defense techniques. e.g. you will likely (hopefully) get a mixture of boxing, wrestling, submissions ...


1

As far as I can tell, there is no generally accepted definition of what "free fighting" means. It's definitely not a style in and of itself. In some cases, the "free" in "free fighting" can refer to the part of the fight where you and your opponent are free to move around each other and are not holding onto one another at all. So you're free. That would ...


1

I'd suggest taking them to a Krav class. I have this dilemma with my own son. I have been teaching for many years but it is extremely hard to train your own family. My first instructor taught his own daughters. One became a world champion but the other hated her dad. I wouldn't want to risk doing the later!


1

These kinds of questions are subjective, and normally don't make good questions for StackExchange, however it is one of those common questions people really want some kind of answer for... Having done quite a few martial arts, and having had "taster" experiences of quite a few more, I feel Krav Maga was the most directly focused on self defence as well as ...


1

Practice it the same way you practice just about anything else - by doing a controlled reinactment of it. In other words, roleplay. This can do a couple of things - 1. It teaches your students acting, which can be a valuable skill for both offense and defense (don't let your opponent see you get frustrated or scared). 2. It provides a series of "if...then" ...


1

The three most important factors in choosing a martial art are 1) Teacher 2) Teacher 3) Teacher It doesn't matter who is correct. If you have concerns about safety after one visit to this teacher, then you should probably find a new teacher. As others have said, an accomplished fighter may not know how to teach, and even if he knows how to teach may not ...


1

Your first teacher is correct. You should NEVER LOCK your joints or hyperextend anything as over time, you will start to have joint problems and eventual arthritis. In Gung-fu, the warning against hyperextention is particularly warned against because we learn, in various styles and in general fighting, to block and grapple strikes, pull to push the person ...


1

Hyperextension of the elbow? I would be more concerned about a kick on your head or knee, or maybe an elbow. Muay Thai is a sport with certain risks and dangers. Some instructors teach with a bent arm, some with a straight. Don't worry so much. Learn what the new one is teaching you or move on. Most instructors do not want to see you do your own thing so ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible