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21

The shouting, called kiai, has multiple purported purposes. I would note that I'm posting these not out of a necessary belief in them, but out of explanation as they were taught to me: The forced and trained rapid exhalation of breath. This can be used as both focus (by focusing on breath, one is less inclined to focus on the fear of failure when faced ...


14

Kicking has four parts to it: flexibility, technique, focus and ab's. For the flexibility, I have found PNF stretching to be quite beneficial. This is a form of stretching that uses periodic resistence/contraction followed by relaxation to achieve a deeper strectch and excellent long term results (here is a reasonable Youtube example). Of course flexibility ...


12

I feel there's a core issue here being neglected: When I throw a punch, SOMETIMES MY WRIST DOESN'T STAY STRAIGHT and I run the risk of spraining it. If I could highlight, underline, and make it flash, I would. Your issue here is not simply wrist strength (which, by the way, is not going to be corrected by simple strength training alone), but rather ...


12

I am afraid you are looking for a unicorn and you do not even know what a unicorn is. There's a world of difference between giving your daughter enough training to "survive" a date and her surviving walking back to base after crossing Mogadishu. No Nonsense Self-Defense is a good place to start looking at these issues but is by no mean exhaustive. As for ...


11

Generally (though this is often mis-taught), any sort of fingertip striking is done to the soft tissues of the body, a notable exception being thumb tip striking which may attack bone. You'll notice the way the body must be positioned in each regard to the twisting of the hand to strike palm up, palm down, or palm perpendicular, which hints at positioning ...


10

I'm going to be very precise with my answer here. Your technique will remain the same, your kicks and punches should still be the same as when you practice them. What does change though is your approach to your opponent so that you can deliver that technique. Because your opponent is taller, you will have more issues than it just being harder to reach their ...


10

Depends on the style, but for the purposes of most Japanese martial arts, the "shouts" are Kiai and serve a couple different purposes: Contracts the diaphragm and chest which can allow you to take a hit better. Puts extra "energy" behind the strike as it causes you to focus on the moment of impact. Shows "spirit" when in competition. Shows where strong ...


10

Thanks to Dave L. for alerting me to this very erudite discussion! Re. marketing material; there is no strong evidence that any of the "set play" sequences demonstrated by Barton-Wright and Pierre Vigny for B-W's Pearson's Magazine article were performed verbatim during training at the original Bartitsu Club in London. On that basis, it's arguable that ...


10

Head shots - knock out Impact to the head can cause actual loss of consciousness, by brain trauma. Liver shots - knock down Hitting the liver can be devastating, but does not cause loss of consciousness. As shown here in the Hatton/Castillo fight, or here, with de la Hoya getting hit by Bernard Hopkins, liver strikes can be so incredibly painful that ...


9

My answer is not exactly on the question "Rising on the ball or staying flat", but rather tries to make clear the reason why exactly you might prefer to stay flat, and not even pivot away. The underlying reasoning can be transferred to your question, since standing up will diminish power and snap according to the views below. Of course, all of the following ...


8

Personally when I am performing ikkyo from something like kata dori (tori) I am just gingerly holding the wrist, with the emphasis on the other hand articulating the elbow. When I am performing nikyo from the same attack I am gripping the wrist in such a was to actually be applying nikyo. Some people may not make this distinction, and it could be they ...


8

Try pivoting on the heel, before you shift your weight onto the foot, as opposed to pivoting on the ball after the weight is already on it. I had an interesting experience regarding this question when I switched from traditional Tae Kwon Do to Shaolin Kung Fu years ago: In TKD, there was a very intense focus on all the little details of how exactly to ...


8

[NB: It is entirely likely that you will have no idea what I'm talking about here. Unless you have training in Bujinkan Ninpo Taijutsu, this will all be foreign to you, and this is purposely so. This is based on content from my own training manual, and is meant to aid students in their continued study of taijutsu and is not for everyone.] From the ...


8

This is a fairly common problem on both sides of the equation. We have to continually emphasize the importance of breathing during the techniques with newer students… and the importance of breathing out when having a technique performed on you. So step 1 is to trust that everyone in the room you are practicing has probably had this problem before, either ...


7

As Trevoke said, there are no shortcuts, no fast-and-easy way to know you are relaxed. This is a very deep subject. Relaxing the body is much easier than relaxing the mind. There are biofeedback methods you can use to relax your body. Relaxing the mind gets into meditation. However, as long as your mind searches out for an objective -- or a shortcut like ...


7

Yes and no. The techniques you use while standing have to be modified to work from the ground. If the art you are studying does not have a ground combat set of techniques, you need to get back to a stance where your art works. You have a different set of vulnerabilities and tactical advantages than you may be used to. Some things don't change: Power ...


7

Someone who is "rooted" to the ground is difficult to move or control and can use this property to move and control others more easily. It's all about body structure. Here is a video of a short demonstration of being rooted. Uprooting someone is when you break their connection to the ground or the structure that connects them to the ground so that they ...


7

This question about vertical-fist punching might help you. I'd say that keeping the fist vertical for a "jab or "cross" makes it an entirely different punch with a dubious connection to boxing or MMA. As for this specific situation, I think the salient point is that a fellow student of unknown expertise is giving you advice that contradicts your ...


6

I have always approached (and been taught) ikkyo as a martial exercise, rather than technique. Rather than being a strong technique, static ikkyo practice teaches: Moving in and off the line of attack, Footwork and movement, Posture and breathing, And other very basic concepts (hara, centeredness, maai, etc) Nikyo (as well as Sankyo, Yonkyo, ...


6

Absolutely. Actually, one of the schools in the Bujinkan (Gikan-ryu) was reportedly heavily influenced by the inclusion of a one-armed soke. There is, of course, a strong natural disadvantage (all else being equal) to having only one arm available (for example, the opponent knows your high attacks will largely come from that side, you are not naturally ...


6

Being rooted means having a stable center of gravity (CoG). Uprooting someone means to go under their CoG and take control of it. Once that is done, defeat, throw, project, lift are just possible courses to follow. This answer to a question about a seated Daito-Ryu technique makes allusion to it even by the wording used - the teacher takes control of the ...


6

What is precision? There's a misconception about what it means to be precise, so to illustrate, let's examine two options: OPT1: A direct punch going straight out. OPT2: A punch that follows the target. If we attempt to strike a given moving target, it is the natural inclination to want to follow the target (OPT2) as we strike. This extends the length of ...


6

There are 2 places where you can check a kick : the knee and the shin. If you check with your own shin bone, you are creating a shin to shin contact and, intuitively, one can expect the damage to be similar for both opponents. However, while the location of the hit will be similar, the results, at least if you want to talk about physics, will be very ...


5

Here's the main problem: Efficient, deadly moves are not pretty. They're mostly invisible. Pretty, showy, artistic, theatrical moves are not efficient, or deadly. And they're very visible. Now, from there, take an efficient, deadly, invisible move and make it pretty, show, artistic and theatrical. There's your recipe. I'll throw you a bone: The punch ...


5

There is no "fast and simple technique to relax", except maybe a hypnose-induced trigger, and I expect it would have to be carefully composed. This is done like everything else - piecemeal. And when you get familiar with meditation, it becomes something you carry around with you. The other solution is to start paying a lot of attention to your body, so you ...


5

Slugster's great post forgot to mention relaxation. Conditioning to build strength and improve flexibility is very important. However, fast, fluid motion also requires you to be relaxed and it's harder to achieve relaxation of the large leg muscles than it is of the arms. One drill I give people is to get a pile of cushions at a height they can ...


5

In my experience they are both a reverse punch, or gyaku zuki, which is done on the same side as the rearward leg and is one of the most basic foundation techniques taught in traditional karate styles. You should practice it stepping forwards and backwards, you never know when you are going to need it. In terms of co-ordination it is certainly harder to ...


5

You'll notice a difference between the images in the book and the way Tony Wolf performs it (I suspect, and I say this out of speculation based on a childhood of slipping on dance floors in dress shoes at cotillion, that this has a great deal to do with foot wear and surfaces). When Mr. Wolf is performing the technique, he's deep under the armpit, and the ...


5

A knockout occurs when the brain bounces around the braincase. This movement causes injury which will lead to unconsciousness. In order to have a high chance of knocking the person out, the best place to target is the chin. This is both a relatively soft target, compared to other parts of the skull, and is relatively easy to get to. Impact there creates a ...


5

Believe it or not, you're actually seeing Jeet Kune Do (which was adapted to look more visually spectacular). Jeff Imada, who was the chief choreographer for the films studied JKD with no-one other than Brandon Lee. The knife techniques are actually his own. He spent a long time developing techniques with the butterfly knife and even published two books on ...



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