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11

At first glance Krav Maga and Systema seem to be very similar in that they are both very unconventional, no-rules, practical self-defence, martial arts (although Krav isn't technically a martial art) which are no holds barred and generally formless. However... Krav Maga is basically a very raw, dangerous situation survival system (including avoidance and ...


9

Kotegaeshi (小手返し etimology) is a supinating wrist lock and is generally translated as "wrist throw". The throw works on the manipulation of the wrist, which turns the fore-arm, then the shoulder, then the whole body. If tori's hand is supporting uke's wrist, then the twist will be much lessen. This means that there is less pressure/pain on the wrist itself. ...


8

Thrusting AND Slashing are both useful It might "seem" slashing is more powerful because it involves bigger movements, and depending on the weapon, you feel, in your arm, that you're getting more force... but... it's not. Thrusting concentrates more force onto a smaller point, allowing better penetration. Stabbing weapons tend to cause more lethal ...


6

The only nose attack I would trust, assuming the opponent isn't already immobilized, is to push or pull the nose upwards (that is, towards the eyebrows). This can facilitate a throw (e.g. osotogari with a palm push under the nose, similar to how it can be done under the chin), expose the neck to a choke (e.g. driving the ridge of the hand upward from between ...


6

The fist should move as little as possible. The power of the uppercut comes from slightly dipping in the knees while turning the hip and then pushing from the hip. The elbow shouldn't move behind the body at all. The movement should look a little like the elbow is fixed at the hip and being pushed by the hip rotation/thrust. Only at the very end the arm ...


5

Anderson Silva, an MMA fighter with a muay Thai background, has executed low-kick catches in the UFC against Chael Sonnen (to an inside leg kick, no less) and James Irvin, as described in this Judo Chop article. The James Irvin kick catch was simply spectacular, and seems like it would apply well to strict MT competition as well. (Note that the Irvin kick ...


5

Asking for a strategy upfront is not going to be beneficial, especially on the internet - we have never met this opponent so all we know is he's bigger and stronger than you (and we have no idea how big you are). Train hard. Be confident in your knowledge and capabilities. You should start learning to read your opponents - it's an important skill to have, ...


4

Attempting such a kick is one thing, but given how easily the opponent can pull push or twist you with the leg they're holding, and all the ways in which your attempted kick might miss or make more or less contact than hoped, it's very presumptuous to assume anything about how you'll land afterwards let alone "fall with the hands to the floor and bring your ...


4

The legality of the move has already been answered by Juann and others in the comments. Even if it was legal, this would be a poor option. If a Muay Thai opponent grabs your leg (catches your kick), the next thing they are going to do is smash the thigh of your supporting leg. They are not going to give you a moment to start launching your own convoluted ...


4

The video is from the World Martial Arts Association which was setup by Michael T. Dealy in the early 1990s, Mike Dealy trained under Grandmaster Duk Sung Son. The style is Chung Do Kwan, a form of Tae Kwon Do with light or no-contact. The WMAA has a video channel on Youtube, but about a year ago all video's were removed, probably because of the criticism ...


4

My advice whenever you're facing either someone who's more advanced or bigger is to concentrate on your basic, "high percentage" techniques and be as precise and as quick as you can. Stick to things you know well, and avoid any temptation to do something "cool" or something you've just recently learned. In another answer, I discussed what "high percentage" ...


4

No. There is no evidence that chi does anything, let alone going as far as creating an actual weapon.


3

If the kick is slow enough or sloppy enough to be caught, then yes you should catch it. Why not - it's there for the taking. In a non-tournament situation (i.e. real life) catching a kick should mean fight over. When shouldn't you catch a kick? When you run the risk of breaking your arm by getting it in the way, or you become vulnerable to further ...


3

It starts from back control: seatbelt control, two hooks in, rider's back on the ground. As a reference for right/left side, I'll follow the Gi match; I'll give instructions as if I were Keenan's coach. Directions Lay on your left side, so you can trap the holding arm and turn away from the choking arm. In the meantime, grab the choking wrist or arm with ...


3

Concepts offer mutiple opportunities: they are general and widely applicable, and as such they allow to compress information in order for you to learn and rememeber more stuff. they are a useful tool to discover, analyze and refine techniques; this ranges from pioneering a new technique to adapting certain techniques to your own body and fighting style. ...


3

The nose is basically soft tissue over cartilage. About the only effective method from the front is as Dave says, some kind of impact pushing the nose in or upwards. Anything else, the nose doesn't really afford a good way to grab from the front. Even shoving your fingers into the nostrils, there is no purchase point for the grab, and the instinct is to ...


3

With a thrust, I have all of the weight and power of the weapon behind the striking point. It's going to archive MUCH more power, and pressure. Also it takes up less space than a slash. To slash, you have to create a large amount if movement, not to mention getting the angle perfectly correct (which takes years of practice)


3

To help understand the difference between a thrust and a slash, consider some hopefully familiar movements: a cricket bat... if you "slash" with the bat you can hit a cricket ball 100 metres or more in the air, while if you prod at the ball with the end of the bat it might only go a few metres. On the other hand, if you had an everyday door to get through ...


3

I've read that a chop to the throat can break the clavicle. If you break the clavicle, then if your attacker tries to swing a punch at you he won't be able to because the bone structure allowing him to will be broken. He'll also be in extreme pain as soon as he does. A chop to the throat, if done correctly, can also damage the throat but more importantly ...


3

They've actually covered parts of this on the Skeptics SE. Short version, the reduced surface area of the chop lends itself to severely damaging the vertebrae and/or severing the spinal cord through impact. Within the movies, chops were used primarily because it was exotic-looking and it indicated a clear use of eastern martial arts compared to striking the ...


3

The question is not well phrased. It's like asking "Which is a better tool: hammer or screwdriver?" (Answer: it depends...) The better question is "which is a more effective martial arts technique?" There is no historical basis to support the claim that slashing weapons were generally cavalry weapons. Here are some relevant historical examples: Swords ...


2

A chop to the neck can damage the blood vessels (e.g. carotid artery or jugular vein), the airway (e.g. trachea), or the cervical spine. A hit to the neck can also transmit kinetic energy into the spinal column. All of these are potentially lethal. Strikes to the back of the neck, or at the base of the skull, are especially dangerous. The nearby tissue is ...


2

One thing that slows people down is putting tension on their blocking leg too early. The leg should stay very relaxed while moving up. Apply tension only in the moment before checking the incoming leg. One drill you can do for that is to do a couple of minutes of quickly lifting your knees as if to block after a long training. Because you are already ...


2

I want to emphasize I am not an expert, but it is worth looking at history. Most of the real slashing weapons (scimitars, sabers) were designed to be used from horseback. Slashing was less likely to get the weapon stuck, which was an even bigger problem when on horseback then when fighting on foot. (The famous curve of the Katana which was largely used in ...


2

nothing but your feet may ever touch the mat. With that in mind, there is no kick you can perform that will have enough leverage to do any damage or even cause slight discomfort to your opponent. The only reasonable course of action here would be to punch him in the face until he lets go.


2

Here are some common sitting positions. At my zendo, we sit in Seiza, Lotus, or Half-lotus.


2

Essentially kneeling all the way down so thighs touch calves. Some schools cross the big toes, some don't. So the second description in your question.


2

There are current IWUF text books/dvd available from Kungfudirect.com, the material is written in Chinese however it should cover what you are looking for. Peace, Love, Wushu!


2

Tricky. I've never said this before in my life, but MMA might suit him - learn just enough of whatever else to defend himself until he can wrestle. Failing that, perhaps thai boxing - he'd learn to lift his legs to protect his knees, and even if his punches are easy to dodge, he can work on expecting that and bringing his elbows in to catch anyone ...


2

If you're being serious than here goes. Chi is more of a metaphysical thing. It doesn't exist in the way that you are thinking. There are definitely basis' for what you're getting at with the flow of energy, but that is more about the movement and structure of the body than any form of energy. No you can't form a chi blast, you will just end up looking ...



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