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21

Realistically a collection of white belts aren't going to challenge you much if you've been training for 14 years. I'm reasonably new, tiny and a girl so I'm probably not ever going to find myself in a situation like yours, but some of the ways that my guys train with me might be useful ways that you can challenge yourself instead. Teach me! Teach me! ...


9

Kotegaeshi (小手返し etimology) is a supinating wrist lock and is generally translated as "wrist throw". The throw works on the manipulation of the wrist, which turns the fore-arm, then the shoulder, then the whole body. If tori's hand is supporting uke's wrist, then the twist will be much lessen. This means that there is less pressure/pain on the wrist itself. ...


6

The only nose attack I would trust, assuming the opponent isn't already immobilized, is to push or pull the nose upwards (that is, towards the eyebrows). This can facilitate a throw (e.g. osotogari with a palm push under the nose, similar to how it can be done under the chin), expose the neck to a choke (e.g. driving the ridge of the hand upward from between ...


6

I feel you, bro. Smashing them or putting yourself in bad positions doesn't really help. In my similar situation I see three options: Train something else Make each of them a black belt in something Smash smash smash Train Something Else You don't have to do BJJ. Maybe in this city the best way for you to get better at fighting is to train boxing ...


5

Anderson Silva, an MMA fighter with a muay Thai background, has executed low-kick catches in the UFC against Chael Sonnen (to an inside leg kick, no less) and James Irvin, as described in this Judo Chop article. The James Irvin kick catch was simply spectacular, and seems like it would apply well to strict MT competition as well. (Note that the Irvin kick ...


5

Asking for a strategy upfront is not going to be beneficial, especially on the internet - we have never met this opponent so all we know is he's bigger and stronger than you (and we have no idea how big you are). Train hard. Be confident in your knowledge and capabilities. You should start learning to read your opponents - it's an important skill to have, ...


5

I'm sure you've heard the Bruce Lee quote, "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." You're the wise man now. Some of my best learning has been when I'm teaching someone else how to do things. Some advice: Don't just smash your partners- neither of you learns anything from that. Go slow enough for them to ...


4

The video is from the World Martial Arts Association which was setup by Michael T. Dealy in the early 1990s, Mike Dealy trained under Grandmaster Duk Sung Son. The style is Chung Do Kwan, a form of Tae Kwon Do with light or no-contact. The WMAA has a video channel on Youtube, but about a year ago all video's were removed, probably because of the criticism ...


4

Attempting such a kick is one thing, but given how easily the opponent can pull push or twist you with the leg they're holding, and all the ways in which your attempted kick might miss or make more or less contact than hoped, it's very presumptuous to assume anything about how you'll land afterwards let alone "fall with the hands to the floor and bring your ...


4

The legality of the move has already been answered by Juann and others in the comments. Even if it was legal, this would be a poor option. If a Muay Thai opponent grabs your leg (catches your kick), the next thing they are going to do is smash the thigh of your supporting leg. They are not going to give you a moment to start launching your own convoluted ...


4

No. There is no evidence that chi does anything, let alone going as far as creating an actual weapon.


4

My advice whenever you're facing either someone who's more advanced or bigger is to concentrate on your basic, "high percentage" techniques and be as precise and as quick as you can. Stick to things you know well, and avoid any temptation to do something "cool" or something you've just recently learned. In another answer, I discussed what "high percentage" ...


3

The nose is basically soft tissue over cartilage. About the only effective method from the front is as Dave says, some kind of impact pushing the nose in or upwards. Anything else, the nose doesn't really afford a good way to grab from the front. Even shoving your fingers into the nostrils, there is no purchase point for the grab, and the instinct is to ...


3

If the kick is slow enough or sloppy enough to be caught, then yes you should catch it. Why not - it's there for the taking. In a non-tournament situation (i.e. real life) catching a kick should mean fight over. When shouldn't you catch a kick? When you run the risk of breaking your arm by getting it in the way, or you become vulnerable to further ...


3

It starts from back control: seatbelt control, two hooks in, rider's back on the ground. As a reference for right/left side, I'll follow the Gi match; I'll give instructions as if I were Keenan's coach. Directions Lay on your left side, so you can trap the holding arm and turn away from the choking arm. In the meantime, grab the choking wrist or arm with ...


3

Concepts offer mutiple opportunities: they are general and widely applicable, and as such they allow to compress information in order for you to learn and rememeber more stuff. they are a useful tool to discover, analyze and refine techniques; this ranges from pioneering a new technique to adapting certain techniques to your own body and fighting style. ...


3

The question is not well phrased. It's like asking "Which is a better tool: hammer or screwdriver?" (Answer: it depends...) The better question is "which is a more effective martial arts technique?" There is no historical basis to support the claim that slashing weapons were generally cavalry weapons. Here are some relevant historical examples: Swords ...


2

nothing but your feet may ever touch the mat. With that in mind, there is no kick you can perform that will have enough leverage to do any damage or even cause slight discomfort to your opponent. The only reasonable course of action here would be to punch him in the face until he lets go.


2

Here are some common sitting positions. At my zendo, we sit in Seiza, Lotus, or Half-lotus.


2

Essentially kneeling all the way down so thighs touch calves. Some schools cross the big toes, some don't. So the second description in your question.


2

Tricky. I've never said this before in my life, but MMA might suit him - learn just enough of whatever else to defend himself until he can wrestle. Failing that, perhaps thai boxing - he'd learn to lift his legs to protect his knees, and even if his punches are easy to dodge, he can work on expecting that and bringing his elbows in to catch anyone ...


2

There are current IWUF text books/dvd available from Kungfudirect.com, the material is written in Chinese however it should cover what you are looking for. Peace, Love, Wushu!


2

If you're being serious than here goes. Chi is more of a metaphysical thing. It doesn't exist in the way that you are thinking. There are definitely basis' for what you're getting at with the flow of energy, but that is more about the movement and structure of the body than any form of energy. No you can't form a chi blast, you will just end up looking ...


2

What Dave said. But in particular, you don't normally have to go too far to find great judo players and perhaps judo competitions. after all it is often described as 'old juto anyway (in the 90s judo was a popular alternative in the UK to up your MMA game). Also Ronda Rousey is predominantly from a Judo background and she holds her own :) MMA clubs may be ...


2

You teach! As a student, you learn what you choose to remember from your instructors. You then eventually fall into your "own way" of doing things that feel comfortable while still working. I found that when I began teaching, I drew from all my knowledge of the basics. I ended up relearning my discipline and truly understanding what it was that I was ...


2

Tussles has done a good job of covering how to interact with less experienced partners. Here is how you can adapt your training to adjust to reduced availability of instruction. At some point in every serious practitioner's martial arts journey, it will be time to transition from being a student learning particular techniques as demonstrated by a teacher ...


1

Muay Thai moves list with links for pictures and demos. You could even contribute to update. http://www.blackbeltwiki.com/muay-thai-techniques


1

The funny thing is, this is a great question! It's a great question, because most people wouldn't ask it. Instead, they'd presume that all this point sparring business is so complex and filled with an infinite number of possible techniques and strategies, so why should there be any particular "best" strategy or technique? And how could anyone possibly ...


1

Capoeira! Well, just kidding. I think some big guy's grappling would suite him. Sambo, Greco-Wrestling, Judo... or maybe Keysi. Keysi seems pretty practical, and does not involve much kicks. Fit for brutes. but footwork from boxing might help him be faster.


1

He already has a great grappling foundation from what you've posted. I would think about going with a defensive martial art like jujutsu (traditional rather than brazilian). It will teach him enough defense to protect against low blows that are his weakness as well as how to get in close to the opponent so he can use his size to his best advantage. Also, ...



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