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21

Realistically a collection of white belts aren't going to challenge you much if you've been training for 14 years. I'm reasonably new, tiny and a girl so I'm probably not ever going to find myself in a situation like yours, but some of the ways that my guys train with me might be useful ways that you can challenge yourself instead. Teach me! Teach me! ...


7

Catching a kick is a common technique in Muay Thai and a major part of san da/san shou (Chinese kickboxing). In Muay Thai, I've seen lots of kicking out or sweeping the other leg. This clip teaches one method, and the video ends with clips of competition applications against opponents doing their best to stay standing. Other techniques I've seen in that art ...


7

What's what all the wrist grabbing? In violent situations (as opposed to competitive situations), your assailant is likely to grab you. Grab and hit is one of the most common attacks. Being number 2 behind the haymaker according to the statistics I have seen. Also grab and stab btw. If you have a guard or fence raised they'll grab it to control and clear ...


7

The fact that Wladimir Klitscho could hug his way to win after win keeps me up at night tbh... Clinching is difficult to manage as a ringleader. That's why, I assume, it goes unpunished. At one point, you need to allow infighters to infight(meaning when 1 hand is available, even though the other is holding - for example).. As per why it isn't punished? It's ...


7

First I just want to say that at age 44, you shouldn't expect your body to perform the same as an 18 year old's body. It's just not realistic. So resist the temptation to compare yourself to them, or anyone for that matter. Now, that doesn't mean you can't make continual, gradual progress from where you are now. Go ahead and try. But I just want to warn ...


6

Based on mattm's comment, you may be looking for a chassé kick from Savate. There are several variations on the move, but I've found at least one reference to Bruce Lee's signature cross-over side kick coming from the chassé-croisé kick from Savate.


6

I feel you, bro. Smashing them or putting yourself in bad positions doesn't really help. In my similar situation I see three options: Train something else Make each of them a black belt in something Smash smash smash Train Something Else You don't have to do BJJ. Maybe in this city the best way for you to get better at fighting is to train boxing ...


6

If you are 75 kg, then you should not have a problem throwing an opponent who is 102 kg with a basic hip throw. The major hip throw (ogoshi) is the first hip throw in the judo curriculum. It's simplest to start with throwing ogoshi slowly because ogoshi has the nice property that you can stop mid-throw. It's easiest to understand the mechanics while ...


5

I'm sure you've heard the Bruce Lee quote, "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." You're the wise man now. Some of my best learning has been when I'm teaching someone else how to do things. Some advice: Don't just smash your partners- neither of you learns anything from that. Go slow enough for them to ...


5

In summary, you're attempting to regain some kicking ability that you once had but have lost due to inactivity and lack of practice. Your goals are to improve range of motion and flexibility, speed, and control even when holding your kick in place without moving at all. And you'd like to even surpass your abilities when you were once in regular practice. Yet,...


5

In the case of sankyo (or tenkai kote hineri), the most common way to escape the technique is to drop one's elbow. Of course, a well executed tenkai kote hineri prevents that from happening. Any kote hineri (rotational wrist lock) or kote gaeshi (supinating wrist lock) can be escaped with a judicious punch aimed at Tori's nose or to be fair, any body parts. ...


5

Has anyone else fought the way Hamed did in his prime - i.e., the way I described above? Has there ever been another fighter like Prince Naz? Have there been fighters having a style like that? Surely. Have any of them been successful with it? No. That's why you haven't heard of them. The style is similar to why Roy Jones Jr. fell off so hard - you rely ...


4

You can't reliably get good at things you don't practice. In a fight, we don't rise to the level of our expectations. Rather, we fall to the level of our training. Whether it's an eye-poke, strike to the carotid sinus, a chin-push osotogari, or some other dangerous technique, if you never train it against a resisting opponent (that is, in sparring), you ...


4

Great question. I suggest that many of the so-called "too dangerous" techniques are very low-yield in practice. In other words, you're not going to get as much bang for your buck from them as you will your more "meat and potatoes" techniques. Let's take the finger-tip eye gouge for example. This is distinct from shoving your thumb or finger into someone's ...


4

Holds like sankyo rely on crossed extensor reflex action - the sensation of pain causes reflexive activity in other parts of the body. This is most effective when the opposing side of the body has nothing to leverage against, i.e. no wall or floor to push against. This means you can continuously adjust or tweak the hold to prevent the opponent punching or ...


3

You master it by approximation: the more accurate the approximation, the better your odds are when you need it. Now mind you, that also means a great deal of the practice is your entry and positioning against a resisting opponent to deliver whatever is supposed to be your technique that's too dangerous for practice. That's the big pitfall most people fail ...


3

I'm not an expert on the subject, but poking around a little, it turns out that several people have talked about this. As per your question clarification, I'm addressing how the Jack Broughton gloves have impacted the sport. Increased protection First, and foremost, padded gloves make it much safer to punch an opponent with greater force, and in harder ...


3

How you respond will depend on what kind of fight you are in. Kick opponent in groin. This is obviously not something you do to friendly sparring partners. Kick opponent in supporting leg knee. This may cause serious damage to the joint, so it is also not something you should do to friendly sparring partners. Sweep supporting leg. Assuming your partner ...


3

There are plenty of grappling attacks that start from wrist grabs. Wrist grabs are a basic element of eliminating your opponent's attack/defense. It's much easier to attack if you can move the opponent's arms out of the way. Wrist control is one way to start this. Examples: Jimmy Pedro (judo) on grip fighting with wrist control wrestling takedowns more ...


3

I would like to offer an answer from traditional aikido point of view (Iwama ryu/Takemusu). There are lot of grabs on body or clothes: kata dori, kosa dori, hiji dori, morote dori, riote/hantai dori, katate dori, mune dori, sode dori, eri dori and so on, plus grabs from the back ushiro eri dori, ushiro kata dori.... you get the picture. Grabs are ...


3

I've found a key part of the learning process is experimentation. First, learn the basics to where you can do them consistently well. Not perfect, but good. Then play a bit with it. Change the angles, a little bit. Change the weight distribution. Change your timing of when you push off or drop your weight to get your strikes in. The point of this is ...


3

I took it quite literally by perform 50 of each kick daily. I saw improvements pretty quickly. Concentrate on the technique first. The flexibility will come with time.


3

I was a dancer first and became a martial artist later. As I have bad knees, in order to protect them from overrotation, I started off wearing 'footundies', a specialised version of the socks rolled up halfway we used to wear in dance classes to be able to spin on the ball but also to have friction when putting down the heel. I found that I pivot much more ...


2

What Dave said. But in particular, you don't normally have to go too far to find great judo players and perhaps judo competitions. after all it is often described as 'old juto anyway (in the 90s judo was a popular alternative in the UK to up your MMA game). Also Ronda Rousey is predominantly from a Judo background and she holds her own :) MMA clubs may be ...


2

Tussles has done a good job of covering how to interact with less experienced partners. Here is how you can adapt your training to adjust to reduced availability of instruction. At some point in every serious practitioner's martial arts journey, it will be time to transition from being a student learning particular techniques as demonstrated by a teacher ...


2

You teach! As a student, you learn what you choose to remember from your instructors. You then eventually fall into your "own way" of doing things that feel comfortable while still working. I found that when I began teaching, I drew from all my knowledge of the basics. I ended up relearning my discipline and truly understanding what it was that I was doing....


2

What parts of the body should be trained? I don't think it is terribly productive to train in anything but a holistic manner. Whether you are rooting, evading, or redirecting you will need to train your whole body to react in the desired manner. How to be ready for a hard push? Readiness is a product of situational awareness and training. With enough ...


2

Why resist? Why do you want to avoid recoiling? Very frequently someone pushing on you is a little gift, and you can yield and redirect the push to your advantage. Many opponents will unbalance themselves when pushing on you, which is your opening to attack with a throw or lead the opponent into a position to hit them. If you decide to resist OK, but ...


2

Sweeps, throws, and unbalancings. All of them need to happen fairly quickly after capture, of course; giving the kicker an opportunity to reset themselves on their remaining leg makes it a lot harder. The most common issue I see is that people just don't know what to do in a timely fashion. It's odd, because even just rushing the kicker's center of mass is ...


2

Many power punches and kicks get their power coming up from the ground. Both the styles of kicking you describe get their power mainly from coming up from the ground and into your kick. However, one is more of a sharp diagonal stab and the other is more of a sideways stiff force. for the position of the grounded foot for performing back-leg front kicks (...



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