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21

Realistically a collection of white belts aren't going to challenge you much if you've been training for 14 years. I'm reasonably new, tiny and a girl so I'm probably not ever going to find myself in a situation like yours, but some of the ways that my guys train with me might be useful ways that you can challenge yourself instead. Teach me! Teach me! ...


9

Kotegaeshi (小手返し etimology) is a supinating wrist lock and is generally translated as "wrist throw". The throw works on the manipulation of the wrist, which turns the fore-arm, then the shoulder, then the whole body. If tori's hand is supporting uke's wrist, then the twist will be much lessen. This means that there is less pressure/pain on the wrist itself. ...


6

Catching a kick is a common technique in Muay Thai and a major part of san da/san shou (Chinese kickboxing). In Muay Thai, I've seen lots of kicking out or sweeping the other leg. This clip teaches one method, and the video ends with clips of competition applications against opponents doing their best to stay standing. Other techniques I've seen in that art ...


6

I feel you, bro. Smashing them or putting yourself in bad positions doesn't really help. In my similar situation I see three options: Train something else Make each of them a black belt in something Smash smash smash Train Something Else You don't have to do BJJ. Maybe in this city the best way for you to get better at fighting is to train boxing ...


6

Based on mattm's comment, you may be looking for a chassé kick from Savate. There are several variations on the move, but I've found at least one reference to Bruce Lee's signature cross-over side kick coming from the chassé-croisé kick from Savate.


5

I'm sure you've heard the Bruce Lee quote, "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." You're the wise man now. Some of my best learning has been when I'm teaching someone else how to do things. Some advice: Don't just smash your partners- neither of you learns anything from that. Go slow enough for them to ...


5

In summary, you're attempting to regain some kicking ability that you once had but have lost due to inactivity and lack of practice. Your goals are to improve range of motion and flexibility, speed, and control even when holding your kick in place without moving at all. And you'd like to even surpass your abilities when you were once in regular practice. ...


4

No. There is no evidence that chi does anything, let alone going as far as creating an actual weapon.


4

Great question. I suggest that many of the so-called "too dangerous" techniques are very low-yield in practice. In other words, you're not going to get as much bang for your buck from them as you will your more "meat and potatoes" techniques. Let's take the finger-tip eye gouge for example. This is distinct from shoving your thumb or finger into someone's ...


4

You can't reliably get good at things you don't practice. In a fight, we don't rise to the level of our expectations. Rather, we fall to the level of our training. Whether it's an eye-poke, strike to the carotid sinus, a chin-push osotogari, or some other dangerous technique, if you never train it against a resisting opponent (that is, in sparring), you ...


3

How you respond will depend on what kind of fight you are in. Kick opponent in groin. This is obviously not something you do to friendly sparring partners. Kick opponent in supporting leg knee. This may cause serious damage to the joint, so it is also not something you should do to friendly sparring partners. Sweep supporting leg. Assuming your partner ...


3

I'm not an expert on the subject, but poking around a little, it turns out that several people have talked about this. As per your question clarification, I'm addressing how the Jack Broughton gloves have impacted the sport. Increased protection First, and foremost, padded gloves make it much safer to punch an opponent with greater force, and in harder ...


3

The question is not well phrased. It's like asking "Which is a better tool: hammer or screwdriver?" (Answer: it depends...) The better question is "which is a more effective martial arts technique?" There is no historical basis to support the claim that slashing weapons were generally cavalry weapons. Here are some relevant historical examples: Swords ...


3

You master it by approximation: the more accurate the approximation, the better your odds are when you need it. Now mind you, that also means a great deal of the practice is your entry and positioning against a resisting opponent to deliver whatever is supposed to be your technique that's too dangerous for practice. That's the big pitfall most people fail ...


2

There are current IWUF text books/dvd available from Kungfudirect.com, the material is written in Chinese however it should cover what you are looking for. Peace, Love, Wushu!


2

What parts of the body should be trained? I don't think it is terribly productive to train in anything but a holistic manner. Whether you are rooting, evading, or redirecting you will need to train your whole body to react in the desired manner. How to be ready for a hard push? Readiness is a product of situational awareness and training. With ...


2

Why resist? Why do you want to avoid recoiling? Very frequently someone pushing on you is a little gift, and you can yield and redirect the push to your advantage. Many opponents will unbalance themselves when pushing on you, which is your opening to attack with a throw or lead the opponent into a position to hit them. If you decide to resist OK, but ...


2

Some points that are valid to teach people the "natural" hand position opposed to the wrist rotation: it is easier to learn (people want to learn to defend themselves as quickly as possible and the wrist rotation needs more practice and involves additional movement patterns that need to be practiced more) in Krav-Maga you often times use a punch from ...


2

If you're being serious than here goes. Chi is more of a metaphysical thing. It doesn't exist in the way that you are thinking. There are definitely basis' for what you're getting at with the flow of energy, but that is more about the movement and structure of the body than any form of energy. No you can't form a chi blast, you will just end up looking ...


2

Tricky. I've never said this before in my life, but MMA might suit him - learn just enough of whatever else to defend himself until he can wrestle. Failing that, perhaps thai boxing - he'd learn to lift his legs to protect his knees, and even if his punches are easy to dodge, he can work on expecting that and bringing his elbows in to catch anyone ...


2

Many power punches and kicks get their power coming up from the ground. Both those styles of kicking get their power mainly coming up from the ground and into your kick. When kicking straight forward keeping hips square with target, you are able to perform a much more snappier kick with your leg because your balance point is near a more neutral point around ...


2

Tussles has done a good job of covering how to interact with less experienced partners. Here is how you can adapt your training to adjust to reduced availability of instruction. At some point in every serious practitioner's martial arts journey, it will be time to transition from being a student learning particular techniques as demonstrated by a teacher ...


2

You teach! As a student, you learn what you choose to remember from your instructors. You then eventually fall into your "own way" of doing things that feel comfortable while still working. I found that when I began teaching, I drew from all my knowledge of the basics. I ended up relearning my discipline and truly understanding what it was that I was ...


2

What Dave said. But in particular, you don't normally have to go too far to find great judo players and perhaps judo competitions. after all it is often described as 'old juto anyway (in the 90s judo was a popular alternative in the UK to up your MMA game). Also Ronda Rousey is predominantly from a Judo background and she holds her own :) MMA clubs may be ...


2

It really comes down to your style and sensei. In my form we focus on Kihon, which in itself has multiple translations. The focus is on basic of the basics so to answer your question is that you perform a kotegaeshi stretch during warm ups. The idea was to help show thumb placement and strengthen and stretch the wrist. We place the thumb at the base of the ...


2

Sweeps, throws, and unbalancings. All of them need to happen fairly quickly after capture, of course; giving the kicker an opportunity to reset themselves on their remaining leg makes it a lot harder. The most common issue I see is that people just don't know what to do in a timely fashion. It's odd, because even just rushing the kicker's center of mass is ...


2

I heard about Glima. Have a look... https://youtu.be/z7UfuzVbI4A and http://www.viking-glima.com/combat.html There is also another site about historical long-sword fighting aka Historic European Martial Arts: http://www.hemac.org/


2

Asian Fighting Arts by Donn F. Draeger and Robert W. Smith is a good survey of martial arts from Asia. The original, published in 1969, is a little dated, but should give you an idea of the history, content, and weapons used by Asian martial arts systems. This was republished as Comprehensive Asian Fighting Arts in 1980. I don't know how the content of the ...


1

It really depends on your situation I guess, if you are sparring, as above it may be worth sweeping the other leg, Or just to put your point across to your Uke, just move them about the Dojo, controlling the caught leg, and allowing them to balance on the other leg. If this was outside in a street fight, then I would recommend either 1)(extreme - multiple ...


1

Came across this in training a couple of weeks ago - All depends on the kick I guess - Front kick could come in close and sweep them - Roundhouse could strike the supporting leg, groin or thigh (if High), if its low then a take down and side kick would be similar to a front kick. A consideration would be is don't actively look to catch kicks as this can ...



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