New answers tagged

7

The fact that Wladimir Klitscho could hug his way to win after win keeps me up at night tbh... Clinching is difficult to manage as a ringleader. That's why, I assume, it goes unpunished. At one point, you need to allow infighters to infight(meaning when 1 hand is available, even though the other is holding - for example).. As per why it isn't punished? It's ...


1

Is there any reason to believe that Ingle's fighters do better than average in avoiding serious, lasting damage from injuries in the ring? I wouldn't say so. The "hit and get hit" isn't a mantra that is NOT widely taught in boxing. Everybody aims to do this, just in different ways. Some are, obviously, better at it than others though. The style of f.e. ...


0

You should focus on the details now so that you can free yourself from them later. The proper mechanics are vitally important. Proper posture, alignment, and balance are fundamental to functionality (and injury mitigation). Once your form has become second nature, you can work on spontaneity and improvisation. You can only really customize the techniques ...


3

I've found a key part of the learning process is experimentation. First, learn the basics to where you can do them consistently well. Not perfect, but good. Then play a bit with it. Change the angles, a little bit. Change the weight distribution. Change your timing of when you push off or drop your weight to get your strikes in. The point of this is ...


5

Has anyone else fought the way Hamed did in his prime - i.e., the way I described above? Has there ever been another fighter like Prince Naz? Have there been fighters having a style like that? Surely. Have any of them been successful with it? No. That's why you haven't heard of them. The style is similar to why Roy Jones Jr. fell off so hard - you rely ...


1

Being rooted means you can absorb/resist some force without moving. A dancer can be balanced on pointe, but this is not a good stance for rooting because they are easily unbalanced. Balance is necessary but not sufficient to be rooted. Fighting stances will have the feet separated and knees bent to help absorb force. But this is not the end of the story. ...


2

I would like to offer an answer from traditional aikido point of view (Iwama ryu/Takemusu). There are lot of grabs on body or clothes: kata dori, kosa dori, hiji dori, morote dori, riote/hantai dori, katate dori, mune dori, sode dori, eri dori and so on, plus grabs from the back ushiro eri dori, ushiro kata dori.... you get the picture. Grabs are ...


3

There are plenty of grappling attacks that start from wrist grabs. Wrist grabs are a basic element of eliminating your opponent's attack/defense. It's much easier to attack if you can move the opponent's arms out of the way. Wrist control is one way to start this. Examples: Jimmy Pedro (judo) on grip fighting with wrist control wrestling takedowns more ...


7

What's what all the wrist grabbing? In violent situations (as opposed to competitive situations), your assailant is likely to grab you. Grab and hit is one of the most common attacks. Being number 2 behind the haymaker according to the statistics I have seen. Also grab and stab btw. If you have a guard or fence raised they'll grab it to control and ...


2

I hypothesize that it is an outgrowth of sword culture. In a CQC situation, a common tactic would be to control the opponents sword hand (preferably before they can even draw a weapon). A lot of disarming techniques begin with a wrist grab to prevent the weapon from being brought to bear against you. The holistic approach to martial arts would include ...


-2

Micro ring? Look, sounds to me like it's made for bare-knuckle fighting. Look up bare knuckle fighting in the UK on YouTube. They fight in tiny "rings" with no gloves. Some guys use hand-wraps, but they can't call themselves real bare knuckle fighters.


0

Various forms of fencing and swordsmanship are good for learning how to use one hand effectively. Bruce Lee applied a lot of ideas from fencing to how he performed his lead punch. In some styles of historical fencing, notably British sabre, it is common to put the off hand (usually the left) behind the back. This both makes it less likely to be cut and, in ...


0

Short answer. Yes. Longer answer. There are entire martial arts/combat sports which are designed for exactly this situation. By attempting to use standing techniques on the ground you are basically re-inventing the wheel from a position of inexperience, i.e. probably badly. As such, this answer agrees with @daveliepmann. The drill sequences you find in ...


2

It can be very hard to impossible to willingly off-balance an (maybe sub-conciously) uncooperative, stronger opponent, i.e. to have enough kuzushi. That is where Judo (in the very sense of the expression) begins. And as Judo is Jujitsu specialized on throwing (among other things), I will answer purely in this context. I personally had the experience with a ...


0

I got attacked with a metal bar by a tuk tuk driver trying to rob me. I blocked it with my forearm which caused an open fracture in the process (would have hit me in the head otherwise). I managed to avoid the next few rush attacks and run away which is always the best defence. I've always been a bit sceptical about weapons drills as they seem unrealistic - ...


6

If you are 75 kg, then you should not have a problem throwing an opponent who is 102 kg with a basic hip throw. The major hip throw (ogoshi) is the first hip throw in the judo curriculum. It's simplest to start with throwing ogoshi slowly because ogoshi has the nice property that you can stop mid-throw. It's easiest to understand the mechanics while ...


2

The best option would be to ask your instructor to watch what you do with both the opponents you mention in your post. He will be able to check that you're doing the technique correctly and if you're doing it differently for the two opponents. Alternatively (and if you're allowed to) have someone video you performing the technique on both opponents and see ...



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