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Pro tip: a slash is considerably less useful than a proper cut. Also, a thrust doesn't require nearly as much power as a slash/cut because you're using a much smaller contact area, hence the pressure is much higher (it is science). Which is why the side of a needle doesn't hurt nearly as much as the point end, even if you push really hard.


2

To help understand the difference between a thrust and a slash, consider some hopefully familiar movements: a cricket bat... if you "slash" with the bat you can hit a cricket ball 100 metres or more in the air, while if you prod at the ball with the end of the bat it might only go a few metres. On the other hand, if you had an everyday door to get through ...


5

Thrusting AND Slashing are both useful It might "seem" slashing is more powerful because it involves bigger movements, and depending on the weapon, you feel, in your arm, that you're getting more force... but... it's not. Thrusting concentrates more force onto a smaller point, allowing better penetration. Stabbing weapons tend to cause more lethal ...


2

I want to emphasize I am not an expert, but it is worth looking at history. Most of the real slashing weapons (scimitars, sabers) were designed to be used from horseback. Slashing was less likely to get the weapon stuck, which was an even bigger problem when on horseback then when fighting on foot. (The famous curve of the Katana which was largely used in ...


3

With a thrust, I have all of the weight and power of the weapon behind the striking point. It's going to archive MUCH more power, and pressure. Also it takes up less space than a slash. To slash, you have to create a large amount if movement, not to mention getting the angle perfectly correct (which takes years of practice)


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I do TKD sparring (and usually win), and sparring is very tiring and taxing as well. I go for more of a technique side. I try to conserve my energy as much as possible, not throwing a shot unless I know there is a very good chance of it scoring. I am always shifting in and out of target range, so I'm not taking a beating 24/7. Of course, endurance is ...


4

At first glance Krav Maga and Systema seem to be very similar in that they are both very unconventional, no-rules, practical self-defence, martial arts (although Krav isn't technically a martial art) which are no holds barred and generally formless. However... Krav Maga is basically a very raw, dangerous situation survival system (including avoidance and ...


1

Well Technique taps into reserves of energy (endurance) Endurance is conserved with efficient execution and strong guard (technique). So Without endurance, your technique falls to bits fast. Without technique your endurance falls to bits fast. It isn't one or the other, it's both, in equal measure - that's why it's so tough. If you aim for good ...


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(This answer portrays only to the majority of american karate businesses known as the infamous mcdojo) It is my (bad) experience with karate where they teach alot of "theory" moves. That being, ones that sound good in theory, but would the actually work? most of these tend to be fake. Of course, this doesn't apply to the (rare) good karate schools. ...


3

They've actually covered parts of this on the Skeptics SE. Short version, the reduced surface area of the chop lends itself to severely damaging the vertebrae and/or severing the spinal cord through impact. Within the movies, chops were used primarily because it was exotic-looking and it indicated a clear use of eastern martial arts compared to striking the ...


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A chop to the neck can damage the blood vessels (e.g. carotid artery or jugular vein), the airway (e.g. trachea), or the cervical spine. A hit to the neck can also transmit kinetic energy into the spinal column. All of these are potentially lethal. Strikes to the back of the neck, or at the base of the skull, are especially dangerous. The nearby tissue is ...


3

I've read that a chop to the throat can break the clavicle. If you break the clavicle, then if your attacker tries to swing a punch at you he won't be able to because the bone structure allowing him to will be broken. He'll also be in extreme pain as soon as he does. A chop to the throat, if done correctly, can also damage the throat but more importantly ...


2

One thing that slows people down is putting tension on their blocking leg too early. The leg should stay very relaxed while moving up. Apply tension only in the moment before checking the incoming leg. One drill you can do for that is to do a couple of minutes of quickly lifting your knees as if to block after a long training. Because you are already ...


1

jump rope . practice lunge steps with weight in hand. jump on a tire layed down on the ground, like them thai`s do. re-learn your foot work. try boxing foot work. move your feet to a beat or metronome and learn -practice to sync steps to the beat. push a bag-punching and practice chasing and escaping via stepping front-back. now give me 100 dollars ...


0

block incomming knees with your own knee. must beat the timing and impose your. knee onto the opponets inner thigh area. generally this is a diagonal outward knee. utub has too many video on thai clinch , everyone needs to use there utube resources.


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I see Dave Liepmann's already touched on what I want to say, which is that thinking about shoulders is a cart-before-the-horse mentality, and instead you should focus on your use of legs and how they're accelerating your hips, then how the torso drags the shoulders after the hips. Once you've mastered that to the point where you can pass a sizable ...


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In my meager boxing experience, I've been taught to assiduously avoid cocking back before a strike. It telegraphs your intentions. The power that it provides would be better developed through better body mechanics in the hips and legs. However, if you throw a technique that loads you up towards the right rear, such as a right round kick or a left straight ...


2

The answer is probably "it depends". Some examples: If you're employing the cross without preparation as the first technique in a combination it is most likely better not to telegraph your attack by "winding-up" a lot. If your cross is a follow-up on a technique on a jab/kick from the other side it is easier to conceal the wind-up in the previous ...



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