New answers tagged

0

Background, in case you're curious, I'm a second dan black belt training for competitive sparring. So, it's my opinion that there are two things that you should work on to improve finesse. One of them is flexibility, but I'm sure you already know this. Have a solid stretching routine, and stick with it. The most important places to stretch are your hips and ...


2

I took it quite literally by perform 50 of each kick daily. I saw improvements pretty quickly. Concentrate on the technique first. The flexibility will come with time.


6

First I just want to say that at age 44, you shouldn't expect your body to perform the same as an 18 year old's body. It's just not realistic. So resist the temptation to compare yourself to them, or anyone for that matter. Now, that doesn't mean you can't make continual, gradual progress from where you are now. Go ahead and try. But I just want to warn ...


1

There are a few aspects to this: Make sure you're developing those "perfectionist" techniques so you can apply them minimally from your usual fighting position - they should snap out with minimal telegraphing. Practice on the heavy bag, making sure you can launch a wide variety of your techniques from the same guard position, as well as advance, retreat, ...


7

The fact that Wladimir Klitscho could hug his way to win after win keeps me up at night tbh... Clinching is difficult to manage as a ringleader. That's why, I assume, it goes unpunished. At one point, you need to allow infighters to infight(meaning when 1 hand is available, even though the other is holding - for example).. As per why it isn't punished? It's ...


1

Is there any reason to believe that Ingle's fighters do better than average in avoiding serious, lasting damage from injuries in the ring? I wouldn't say so. The "hit and get hit" isn't a mantra that is NOT widely taught in boxing. Everybody aims to do this, just in different ways. Some are, obviously, better at it than others though. The style of f.e. ...


1

You should focus on the details now so that you can free yourself from them later. The proper mechanics are vitally important. Proper posture, alignment, and balance are fundamental to functionality (and injury mitigation). Once your form has become second nature, you can work on spontaneity and improvisation. You can only really customize the techniques ...


3

I've found a key part of the learning process is experimentation. First, learn the basics to where you can do them consistently well. Not perfect, but good. Then play a bit with it. Change the angles, a little bit. Change the weight distribution. Change your timing of when you push off or drop your weight to get your strikes in. The point of this is ...



Top 50 recent answers are included